10 Memorable Bookish Characters #TopTenTuesday #BooksAboutBooks

May 10, 2022

10 Memorable Bookish Characters

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Memorable Bookish Characters (white text in a coral text box over a background of wild poppies)

I’m linking up today with #TopTenTuesday: That Artsy Reader Girl: Bookish Characters.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Memorable characters make books memorable!

I LOVE wonderful, memorable characters! And I especially love the opportunity to talk about bookish characters and share them! Books about books and books, bookshop and library settings, and bookish characters are my favorite subgenre.

If you are looking for a wonderful summer read, consider one of these titles!

In no particular order, here are 10 of my most memorable bookish characters…I love each one!

(Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links.)

Cussy from The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

Cussy is a pack-horse librarian in the mountains and hills of Kentucky and a determined, compassionate literacy advocate and difference-maker.

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)


Mukesh from The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams

Mukesh discovers the joys of reading and makes an unexpected friend.

The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams (cover) white text overe a graphic image of scattered open books


Grace from The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

Grace falls in love with reading and meets the love of her life in a dusty old bookshop during WW11.

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands near shelf lined books next to a window holding an open book


Madeleine from The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

Madeleine finds a fresh beginning and new friends as the new owner of her beloved aunt’s bookshop.

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay (cover)


Emilia from How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry

Emilia returns to her seaside home to save her late father’s beloved bookshop.

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry (cover)


Dita from The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

Real-life Dita Kraus is a daring and feisty teenager who bravely risks her life to bring literacy to the children of Auschwitz.

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)


Fikry from The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Quirky and opinionated, Fikry is changed forever by an abandoned baby and a sales representative. 

 The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (cover)


 Juliet and Dawsey from The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

Juliet and Dawsey and the book club members become found family. (epistolary)

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean


Helene and Frank from 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

This is actually a memoir revealing a true bookish (long-distance) friendship. (epistolary)

84, Charing Cross Road by Jelene Hanff (cover) Image: sepia toned picture of a London bookstore


Evie from The Jane Austen Society

A quiet young woman, Evie plays a crucial role in the preservation of Austen’s work and is a member of the first Jane Austen book club.

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner (cover) Image: five people (backs to camera) walk with arms linked


There are sooooo many more, but these are the first 10 that came to mind. If bookish characters could recommend books, they would certainly highly recommend each of these!



QOTD:

Who is one of your most memorable bookish characters?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

One Word Reviews of 10 Five Star Fiction Reads #TopTenTuesday

May 3, 2022

One Word Reviews of 10 Five Star (adult) Fiction Reads

Swirl and Thread blog header (a white pitches filled with purple and white lilacs, a tea cup, glasses resting on an open book)

I’m linking up today with #TopTenTuesday: That Artsy Reader Girl: One Word Reviews.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

This prompt calls for one word reviews of your last 10 reads….however, I have a few duds in my last 10 reads and I don’t like to draw unnecessary negative attention to books that haven’t been to my taste because no two people read the same books and you might love one that I disliked.

So….for this prompt I will spin the topic to give you one word reviews of my last 10 five star (adult) fiction reads. I tried not to overthink it otherwise I would end up with a phrase or paragraph! My one word is simply the first word that came to mind. Titles are links to my reviews. (listed in order of date read and not by date reviewed)

A Hundred Crickets Singing by Cathy Gohlke

“Compelling”

A Hundred Crickets Singing by Cathy Gohlke (cover) Image: a young woman viewed from the waist up stands with her back to the camera and arms held behind her waist.

The Book Woman’s Daughter (The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek #2) by Kim Michele Richardson

“Pageturning”

The Book Woman's Daughter by Kim Michele Richardson (cover) Image: old work boots sit atop a stack of books

I Must Betray You (YA) by Ruta Sepetys

“Sobering”

I Must Betray You by Ruta Sepetys (cover) Image: grayscale image of a man standing outside a building holding a blue/yellow/red torn flag

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine (reread) by Gail Honeyman

“Surviving”

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson

“Misunderstood”

Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson (cover) Image: white text over a multicolored graphic shapes background

Sisters of Night and Fog: A WW11 Novel by Erika Robuck

“Harrowing”

Sisters of Night and Fog by Erika Robuck (two women wearing hats and business suits walk away from the camera in a field of low fog)

Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

“Heartwarming”

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

“Reflective”

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (cover) Image:

Sparks Like Stars by Nadia Hashimi

“Frightening”

Gold and Sparks Like Stars by Nadia Hashimi (cover) Image: white text against a dark blue background

The Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman

“Supportive”

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman (cover) Image: two girls sit on a wing of a plane



QOTD:

Do you think one word reviews are easy or hard?
Do you have a one word review for the last book you read?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

What Genre Can You Identify by Looking at the Book Cover? #TopTenTuesday

April 26, 2022

What Genre Can You Identify by Looking at the Book Cover?

 

Swirl and Thread blog header (a white pitches filled with purple and white lilacs, a tea cup, glasses resting on an open book)

I’m linking up today with #TopTenTuesday: That Artsy Reader Girl: Books With [_____] on the Cover.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I don’t often create a post of book covers. However, for this week’s top ten prompt I couldn’t resist drawing your attention to historical fiction covers!

I don’t usually choose books based on covers, but I know many others do!
I’m curious……..Are you able to determine a genre by looking at the cover?
For example, Romance/RomComs usually have cute graphic covers such as these:

But what about historical fiction? Have you noticed a trend in histfic covers?

In recent years, historical fiction can often be identified by a woman with her back to the camera as seen in the following selections. I’ve gotten to the point of inwardly groaning when I see another hisfic cover featuring a woman’s back!

(in no particular order)



QOTD:

What genre can you identify by the cover?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

Spring 2022 TBR #TopTenTuesday

March 15, 2022

Spring Reading Season TBR (2022)

Spring Reading TBR

Image Source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

For spring, these are the ten books prioritized at the top of my TBR Mountain. I finished seven books from my Winter TBR and didn’t get to three: 2 are going back on my general TBR….they’ve been on and off my priority TBR a couple of times and I am not feeling the urgency (#moodreader) and one will be put on next winter’s TBR because it’s a Christmas romance.

For this Spring TBR, there are a mix of genres, and I’m hoping for some winners here. Have you read any of these or is one on your TBR? ***Note: four are ARC (advanced reader copy) commitments and publication dates are noted. 

I never plan more than ten titles for my quarterly TBR lists because I need to leave time for mood reading and review commitments. These ten books (in no particular order) are a priority on a much longer general TBR.

What is your most anticipated read this spring?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Spring 2022 To Be Read List.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)


Spring 2022 TBR


The Little Wartime Library by Kate Thompson

The Little Wartime Library by Kate Thompson (cover) Image: a young woman in a white blouse and red skirt sits on a cabinet top surrounded by books and bookshelves

Genre: Historical Fiction
I’m waiting for this to be abailable on kindle because I no longer buy physical copies.
***Thanks for the rec Joanne @ Portobello book blog

(more…)

10 Women Authors and Their Debuts #TopTenTuesday #WomensHistoryMonth #InternationalDayOfTheWoman

March 8, 2022

Women Authors and Their Debuts

Women's History Month: Debut Authors (Image: two women standing at the edge of a bluff looking out over the ocean)

Background Image: Canva

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl but going rogue!

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Do you have a favorite debut author?

Too many! Amirite?!

I’m going rogue today with Top Ten Tuesday because I want to acknowledge International Day of the Woman as part of Women’s History Month.

Publishing was a field for men. In publishing history, there was a time when women authors could not get published. Women were not allowed to sign their own contracts, did not receive equal pay, and were forced to write under pseudonyms. For International Day of the Woman, I’m focusing on modern women authors and their debuts as we celebrate those who fought hard for the right to be heard, sign their own contracts, and publish under their own name for equal pay.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Let’s celebrate women authors!
I’ve listed a few (recent) notable debuts in no particular order.

1

Fatima Farheen Mirza
Debut: A Place For Us

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

…complicated family drama

2

Yaa Gyasi
Debut: Homegoing

 

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi cover (yellow background with red and blue and black designs)

…multigeneraltional family saga

3

Angeline Boulley
Debut: The Firekeeper’s Daughter

The Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley (cover) Image: the profiles of two native american young People (man and woman) in cultural dress

indigenous people and the FBI

4

Anne Youngson
Meet Me at the Museum

…friendship and correspondence

 

5

Charmaine Wilkerson
Debut: Black Cake

Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson (cover) Image: white text over a multicolored graphic shapes background

…complicated family drama

6

Abi Daré
Debut: The Girl With the Louding Voice

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)

…finding your voice

7

Gail Honeyman
Debut: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…survival

8

Emma Lord
Debut: Tweet Cute

Tween Cute by Emma Lord (cover) Image: graphic of two apartment buildings shows a teen in each on social media

…YA romcom

9

Anissa Gray
Debut: The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls

…complicated family drama

10

Jane Harper
Debut: The Dry

The Dry

…mystery and suspense

***Edited to add #11

(One of my favs! How could I forget?!)

Cara Wall
Debut: The Dearly Beloved

Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (cover) Image: white text over an orange leafless tree with sprawling branches set against a bright blue background

…friendship

 



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these debut authors?
Do you have a favorite debut author?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature #TopTenTuesday

February 22, 2022

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature

Top Ten Tuesday 10 Favorite Dynamic Duos

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Dynamic Duos in Literature.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Who are your favorite Dynamic Duos?

Too many! Amirite?!

This is a FUN prompt! The following dynamic duos were the first to pop into my mind because if I overthink it, I’ll end up with a list of a hundred. See any favorites?

Who is your favorite dynamic duo?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

The Captain & Johanna
News of the World by Paulette Jiles
(the movie)

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky

…fighting with dimes! IYKYK

2

Ryland & Rocky
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…saving planets! IYKYK!

3

Jack & Wynn
The River by Peter Heller

 

The River by Peter Heller (cover) Image: white text over a background of red and dark blue swirly lines

survival!

4

Eudora & Rose
The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

…multigenerational friendship

5

Eleanor & Raymond
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…friendship at its finest

6

Eliza and Alexander Hamilton
My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

…true partners!

7

Nostagic:
Charlotte & Wilbur
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
(the movie)

 

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White (cover) Image: a graphic image of a young girl, a pig, and a spider

…childhood favorite!

8

Sophie & Barry
Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

…castaways!

9

Hazel & Duncan
Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

…overcoming obstacles, building trust, and facing challenges

10

A Dynamic Trio: Osla, Mab, and Beth
The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

 

a woman dressed in a rose dress stands with her back to the camera overlooking a balcony and a gold wall

…a dynamic TRIO of brave and smart women!



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these?
What’s one of your favorite dynamic duos?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book? 10 Books Too Good To Review Properly #TopTenTuesday #LetsDiscuss2022

February 15, 2022

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book?
What Makes a Book too Good to Review Properly?

10 Books Too Good to Review Properly" (white text over a background of a tall stack of hardback books)

 

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Books Too Good To Review Properly. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

 

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

Have you lost your heart in a book?
Have you been at a loss for words?

lose your heart in a book (white text above and below an open book with the center pages forming a heart...all on a lilac pink background)

Quite often when I attempt to write a review for a book I’ve really REALLY loved, I have a difficult time finding the right words to convey my thoughts. I’m lost for words! Whether you are writing a review or telling your best friend about a book, can you relate to my feelings? Which reviews are the most difficult for you? Which reviews are the easiest?

Why do I find it difficult to write reviews for books I’ve loved? It seems that writing a review for a book I loved should be the easiest to write. This is my reasoning for why it isn’t: I form an emotional connection with books I really really love. I leave a piece of my heart between the pages. A connection we make with a book is personal and when your heart is involved, it makes expressing thoughts coherently in a review more difficult. I fear you won’t feel the same connection or understand it.

The following list is a sample of the types of books I find it difficult to review because I’m lost for words. They are all 4.5-5 Star reads and are on my lifetime favs list and highly recommended. (reviews are linked)

What is one book you feel is too good to review?
Join the discussion in comments.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the poignant themes that gripped my heart….and that last father/son section…all the tissues

2

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom (cover) text on a dark background...vignette of a rowboat on the water

…difficult to review because…
uniquely personal and affects every reader differently

3

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede

The Day the World Came to Town

…difficult to review because…
the amount of kindness, sacrifice, and generosity is too much to list…also because it could have been any one of us on one of those planes that day…how many of you have received kind help from a stranger?

4

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (cover) Image:

…difficult to review because…
poignant end of life reflections

5

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the love for brave Eleanor and you have to experience the ending for yourself (IYKYK)

6

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell (cover) Image: head shot of a young boy wearing a felt hat and a large feather lies horizontally across his eyes

…difficult to review because…
so very emotional!

7

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…difficult to review because…
can’t give away the sacrificial friendship aspect…and BOOM (!) I’ve already said too much! (IYKYK)…
(trust me, you want the audio format for this one!)

8

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer

…difficult to review because…
Backman and the heartfelt and emotional content

9

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger
Finding Chika: A Little Girl, an Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom

…difficult to review because…
memoirs (how do you review someone’s life experience?)

10

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott (cover)

…difficult to review because…
(representative of all the incredibly difficult and emotional WW11 fiction I’ve read)
memorable characters, poignant themes



QOTD:

Have you read or reviewed any of these?
What’s one book you have found difficult to review?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Favorite Light Romance #TopTenTuesday

February 8, 2022

Ten Favorite Light Romance

20 Favorite Light Romance (white text over a background picture of pink roses lying in a white wicker basket)

I’m hopping aboard the “Love Freebie” train today and linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: February Love Freebie

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

“I LOVE a sweet romance!”

You’ll notice looking at this list that I love stories where romance is served as a SIDE. I adore romance when it’s served along with substantial content. That’s why I’m categorizing this list as “light” romance because the romance is not the main focus of the stories. It’s unlikely that these titles are actually shelved as “romance.”

Do you see any favorites?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links. Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews.

(in no particular order)

1

Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

2

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands near shelf lined books next to a window holding an open book

3

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry (cover)

4

Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

last christmas in paris

5

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean

6

Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

7

The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery

The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery (cover) Image a young girl leans against a tree with an open book

8

The Invisible Husband of Frick Island by Colleen Oakley

Invisible Husband of Frick Island by Colleen Oakley (cover) Image: coral and blue text....individual waves wrap randomly around the text

9

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman (cover) Image: two girls sit on a wing of a plane

10

Finding Love at Hedgehog Hollow by Jessica Redland

Finding Love at Hedgehog Hollow nyb Jessica Redland (cover) Image: a white farm house stands alone on a large grassy field...flowere and leaves edge the borders



QOTD:

Have you read any of these or can you recommend another title for my collection?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title #TopTenTuesday

February 1, 2022

Ten Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title

TTT Ten Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title

 

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books With Character Names in the Title

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

“I LOVE these characters!”

I don’t normally post twice in one day but I couldn’t help joining today’s Top Ten Tuesday prompt because I can’t miss an opportunity to share memorable characters (8 adult titles and 2 middle grade titles) with you! Do you see any favorites?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links. Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews.

(in no particular order)

1

Eudora from The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

2

Eleanor from Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

3

Ove from A Man Called Ove

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a man with a cat brushing against his legs stands in an open field with his back to the camera

4

Britt-Marie from Britt-Marie Was Here

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a woman stands on a sidewalk with her back to the camera, a valise and soccer ball at her feet

5

Frankie from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom (cover) Image: black and white drawing of two young kids sitting in a tree (one playing a guitar)

6

Harold from The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

The Unlikely Pilgrimmage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (cover)

7

Fikry from The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (cover)

8

Shergill sisters from The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters

9

Amal from Amal Unbound (MG)

Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed (cover).... two hands palms facing readers that are brightly decorated wtih drawings

10

Isaiah from Isaiah Dunn is my Hero (MG)

Isaiah Dunn Is My Hero by Kelly Baptist (cover) Image: the back view of a middle grade boy wearing a blue superhero cape and holding a pencil

 



QOTD:

Can think think of a title you love that names a character?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text

 



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

Most Memorable Reads of 2021 #TopTenTuesday

December 28, 2021

2021 Memorable Reads:
The Top Ten List and The Categories

2021 Most Memorable Reads

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Best Books I Read in 2021

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!”

I mostly love the angst of creating top ten lists! Although it can be a daunting task, it’s my most anticipated post of the year! First, let me remind you that this list is subjective. It’s compiled of books I’ve read this year (there are always so many more great ones that I didn’t get to), and each one has made it onto this list because reading it was an enjoyable, memorable, emotional experience and gave me a “book hangover.”

I’m presenting my list this year in two formats: in top ten list form and in categories. The categories part is a bit more comprehensive because I provide some runners up and books that didn’t make it to my official top ten. Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links. Although most titles in this post were published this year, a few were not.

Thanks for sharing great reads with me this year!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Top Ten Memorable Fiction Reads of 2021

Based on the qualities of enjoyment, engagement, compelling, unputdownable, and book hangovers.

(see categories below for runners up and additional selections)

1

 The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

2

Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

3

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman

4

Sparks Like Stars by Nadia Hashimi,

5

The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
(finished on 12/31/2020 so it didn’t make last year’s list)

6

The Invisible Woman by Erika Robuck

7

Surviving Savannah by Patti Callahan

8

The Most Beautiful Girl in Cuba by Chanel Cleeton

9

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

10

 Project Hail Mary (the audio version) by Andy Weir

Most Memorable Nonfiction

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede

The Day the World Came to Town



* * * * * BONUS *****

(more…)