Reblog: Summer’s One #MustReadBook 2020 #toptentuesday

July 28, 2020

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Today I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Freebie. For this week’s top ten list I’m reblogging a recent post in which twelve bloggers recommend their ONE recommendation for the summer. I know this is more than ten, but I think you’ll enjoy the bonus picks! I hope you find a great read!

(Originally published, July 17, 2020)

Find Your One “Must Read” Book of Summer 2020!

Are you pondering what book to choose for your vacation or staycation?

Are you in limbo trying to decide what ONE great book to read this summer?

Do you ever wish someone would just TELL you what book to read?

Are you looking for a list of trusted book review bloggers?

Do you spend more time thinking about which book to pack for your vacation than packing the clothes? (oh…just me?)

If you only have time to read ONE more book before summer’s end, what would you choose?

beach reads cartoon

I love the social distancing!

This is the time of year when readers look for “beach reads.” This term is puzzling to me because I think any book you read at the beach or the pool is a beach or pool read (similar to any body at the beach is a beach body!). Furthermore, “beach read” means different things to different readers: some want easy reading/light/fluffy, some want escapist, some want romcom, some want thrillers/suspense/mystery, while others are looking for heavier or longer reads that they might have more time for in the summer. During the summer, I look for the same types of reads I look for all year long: something substantial, engaging, memorable, unputdownable, and thought-provoking. What is your ideal beach or pool read?

Reviewers Recommend:

Some things bring joy to a blogger’s heart and this post is definitely at the top of the list!

I am thrilled to publish this post today! I contacted twelve experienced reviewers from a variety of geographical locations to ask them what they would recommend as their ONE “Not-to-be-Missed” Summer 2020 Recommendation. Today, I’m exceptionally excited to introduce you to twelve bloggers who chose ONE recommendation for YOU (listed in alphabetical order by blogger’s first name). Please take a look at their recommendation, check out their blog, and give them a follow!

I think you’ll enjoy the following “recent releases” recommendations that include some diversity and represent a mix of genres that will appeal to a variety of tastes (from nonfiction to historical fiction to books about literary characters to anti-racism to contemporary fiction to chick-lit to romcom to self-help to literary fiction to romance to science fiction to fantasy to “own voices”).

We hope at least one matches YOUR reading taste!

i love books

***Titles are Amazon affiliate links and full review links have been included.

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#TopTenTuesday: 10 Books That Make Me Smile

July 14, 2020

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books That Make Me Smile

Top Ten Tuesday celebrating 10 years (image: a birthday cake with 10 candles)

*I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Make Me Smile.

If you’ve clicked over from That Artsy Reader Girl, Welcome! Please look around and enjoy your stay.

Today’s prompt is “Books That Make Me Smile” and I hope that I’ve chosen books that will make you smile, also. I interpret “make me smile” to mean that they make me “happy I read that,” not funny books that make me laugh out loud.

Because I read a great deal of histfic, I do not have an overabundance of “uplit” books that fall into this category. I hope you enjoy the titles I’ve picked out for this week’s prompt. Let me know if we share any favorites or if you have an “uplit” title I can add to my list.

 *This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


No.1 Ladies Detective Series by Alexander McCall Smith

Kind, gracious, and wise Mma Precious Ramotswe and a cast of quirky supporting characters and the culture of Botswana bring many smiles to my face. A recent favorite is The House of Unexpected Sisters and I look forward to a new installment this fall, How to Raise an Elephant. Each installment is like visiting with old friends. If you are looking for easy-reading, gentle, comfort reads with likable characters and uplifting themes, this might be a good option.


The Bookish Life of Nina Hill

The Bookish Life of Nina Hill by Abi Waxman

Smart, snappy, and humorous writing with a likable and quirky character will bring a smile to your face. (skip Ch 5 if you are would rather not read crude humor)


Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman (cover)

Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman

If you have children in your life, Backman’s essays on parenthood will bring a smile to your face.


The Boy, the Mole, the Fox, and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy (cover) Image: pen and ink sketch of a horse, a boy, a mole, and a fox

The Boy, the Mole, the Fox, and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy

Delightful illustrations and poignant, thoughtful reflections on life (reminiscent of Winnie the Pooh) will bring a smile to your face.


This Won't End Well (cover) ....a young woman peeking through some bushes

This Won’t End Well by Camille Pagán

Some snappy writing, a quirky character, and an enemies to lovers trope will bring a smile to your face.

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#TopTenTuesday: Most Read Authors

July 7, 2020

Top Ten Tuesday: Most-Read Authors

Top Ten Tuesday celebrating 10 years (image: a birthday cake with 10 candles)

*I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Most-Read Authors.

If you’ve clicked over from That Artsy Reader Girl, Welcome! Please look around and enjoy your stay.

Who is your most read author? It was interesting to crunch the numbers to see which authors made the top of my list. This list reflects reading from recent years and does not reflect my childhood reading. Also, this list is not representative of my favorite authors. Some of my newly discovered favorite authors have only written one or two books.

 *This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Listed in order of the number of books read (not in order of favorite author). I have more than ten authors in this post because #bookproblems



 

Alexander McCall Smith: 22 Books Read

I love Smith’s No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency (series of 20). I adore the kind and gracious Mma Precious Ramotswe and the cast of quirky supporting characters, and I appreciate the setting and culture of Botswana. A recent favorite is The House of Unexpected Sisters and I look forward to a new installment this fall, How to Raise an Elephant. I’ve tried his Scotland series and I read My Italian Bulldozer, but I prefer the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series to anything else. Each installment is like visiting with old friends. If you are looking for easy-reading, gentle, comfort reads with likable characters and uplifting themes, this might be a good option. They definitely fall in the category of “uplit.”



 

Louise Penny: 15 Books Read

The best part of this gentle mystery series for me is the character of Chief Inspector Armond Gamache. The setting of Three Pines is an additional draw. One of my favorites of the series is Glass Houses and I’m looking forward to a new installment in September, All the Devils Are Here.



 

Fredrik Backman: 8 Books Read

If Backman had written 100 books, I would have read them all! They are all different so it’s difficult to choose a favorite. Thus I’m listing all eight! At the moment, he is my favorite author (and will be at the top of this list when he writes more books). I devoted an entire post to Backman here.

Beartown, Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer, Deal of a Lifetime, Things My Son Needs to Know About the World, and Us Against You have been reviewed on the blog. I’m eagerly waiting for number nine due out in September, Anxious People.



A Fall of Marigolds by Susan Neissner (cover) White test on a blue background vordered on three corners with marigolds

Susan Meissner: 5 Books

Susan Meissner writes engaging historical fiction, and my favorite is A Fall of Marigolds.



 

Mitch Albom: 5 Books Read

Do you love Mitch Albom, too? I regret that I’m not yet a Mitch Albom completist. Are you? My favorites are Tuesdays With Morrie, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, and Finding Chika.

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Top Ten Tuesday: 10+ Highly Rated and Favorite WW1 and WW11 Reads

June 23, 2020

Top Ten Tuesday: 10+ Highly Rated and Favorite WW1 and WW11 Reads

10+ Favorite WW1 and WW11 Reads (Image: a tall stack of books on a painted wooden blue table)

Top Ten Tuesday celebrating 10 years (image: a birthday cake with 10 candles)

*I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday’s 10th Anniversary Celebration: Update an Old Post. Today I’m updating a post that was originally published in April of 2018.

If you’ve clicked over from That Artsy Reader Girl, Welcome! Please look around and enjoy your stay.

I read a lot of histfic and one of my favorite sub-genres is WW1 and WW11 histfic. Listed below are 10 of my highest-rated and favorite histfic reads that have also received high star ratings on Goodreads. In addition, I included some honorable mention because there are more than 10 reads that are memorable to me for various reasons. Not all titles are reviewed because I read them before publishing this blog (in which case I’ve provided the Amazon link). *This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Listed in order of their Goodreads star rating (6/22/20).

The Nightingale

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

WW11

 Amazon Information Here

My Rating: 4 Stars

Goodreads Rating: 4.58 Stars



The Medallion by Cathy Gohlke (cover)

The Medallion by Cathy Gohlke

WW11

Full Review Here

My Rating: 4.5 Stars

Goodreads Rating: 4.54 Stars



The Things We Cannot Say by Kelly Rimmer (cover)

The Things We Cannot Say by Kelly Rimmer

WW11

Full Review Here

My Rating: 4.5 Stars

Goodreads Rating: 4.51 Stars



From Sand and Ash

From Sand and Ash by Amy Harmon

WW11

Full Review Here

My Rating: 5 Stars

Goodreads Rating: 4.38 Stars



we were the lucky ones

We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter

WW11

 Full Review Here

My Rating: 5 Stars

Goodreads Rating: 4.40 Stars
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Summer 2020 TBR #toptentuesday

June 16, 2020

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books on My Summer 2020 TBR

 

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books on My Summer 2020 TBR.

With all the books that are on my radar on a given day, it’s nice to pick out a few for an official TBR. Ten still leaves room for library holds that come in, occasional ARCs, or some mood reading.

One question you may ask is “Are these beach reads?” Many readers have differing opinions of what comprises a beach read: some want light and fluffy, some look for thrillers/suspense/mysteries, some seek out escapist reads, while others like to tackle large tomes or serious content during the summer when they have more time. It’s my opinion that any book you read at the beach is a beach read (just like any body at the beach is a beach body). For my summer reads, I look for the types of books I look for all year: memorable, thought-provoking, and unputdownable.

Keep in mind that I’m not yet recommending the books on this list…..check back often though because I will provide updates and links to reviews as I read them. For now, these are the reads that are on my summer 2020 reading radar.

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.

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Ten Favorite Book Quotes #toptentuesday

May 26, 2020

Ten Favorite Book Quotes

Are You a Quote Collector?

Of all the amazing book quotes I’ve collected over the years, I can only remember a few. I had a collection of my favorite quotes in an electronic file, and then I lost the file in a computer crash. I need to rebuild my file, and these are the ten I can remember loving!

Do you have a favorite book quote?

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for TTT. I guess I totally flaked on this week’s topic because I wrote it in my calendar as ten favorite quotes and when I went to link up, I realize that’s not the topic! Oh well….I’ll consider this a tweek because it’s all I’ve got!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links

“And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”

~ The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

“Real isn’t how you are made. It’s a thing that happens to you. when a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with but REALLy loves you, then you become Real…”

“It doesn’t happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all because once you are Real, you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

~The Velveteen Rabbit, Margery Williams

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”

~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, Mary Ann Shaffer

“Courage, Dear Heart.”

~Voyage of the Dawn Treader, C.S. Lewis

“Frankly, My Dear, I don’t give a damn.”

“After all, tomorrow is a better day.”

Classic quotes from Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara (respectively)
~Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchel

“Dear Old World,” she murmured, “you are very lovely and I’m glad to be alive in you.”

~Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery

These four sentences, when easily said, lead to wisdom: “I’m sorry. I was wrong. I don’t know. I need help.”

~Still Life, Louise Penny

“What we carry defines who we are and the effort we make is our legacy.”

~Finding Chika, Mitch Albom

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely, or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature, and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be.”

~The Diary of Anne Frank, Anne Frank

“There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.”

~Emma, Jane Austen

My friend Carla @ Carla Loves to Read created a top ten list of quotes from children’s books! Check it out!

What is one of your favorite quotes?



QOTD:

Please share your favorite quote in comments!



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



ICYMI:

Ten Reasons Why I Love Middle-Grade Books

Top Ten Signs That I’m a Book Lover

 Why getting lost in a book is so good for you according to science!



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and/or author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

10 Reasons Why I Love Middle-Grade Books #toptentuesday #middlegrade

May 19, 2020

Top Ten Reasons Why I Love Middle-Grade Books

Definition of Terms: Middle Grade Reader & Middle Grade Student

∗ A Middle-Grade Reader (ages 8-12) ≠ A Middle-Grade Student (grades 7-9)

These terms can be confusing. A Middle-Grade student (grades 7-9) is truly caught between groups and can read MG or YA. However, most YA (ages 13-18) is geared toward high school and is too mature for younger middle-grade readers who are 8-12 or middle-grade students who are in grades 7-9. There’s a vast difference between an eight-year-old reader and a twelve-year-old reader. Some middle-grade books are geared toward younger readers (e.g. Wishtree), and some authors such as Alan Gratz write for the more mature middle-grade reader (e.g Refugee).

∗ Middle-Grade Fiction is Typically Read by Readers Between Eight and Twelve Years Old.



I predict that either you read Middle-Grade Books or you don’t!

Middle Grade is a genre that you either embrace or avoid!

What say you?

Are you onboard with MG reading or are you standing on the sidelines?

I’m here to persuade you to try MG lit if you haven’t or to remind you why you love it.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for TTT: Top Ten Reasons Why I Love _____ . My focus is Ten Reasons Why I Love Middle-Grade Books.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

1
Hope

Typically, Middle-Grade reads avoid content that includes graphic violence, sexual situations, and profanity. An unwritten expectation for middle-grade reads is that, despite dire circumstances, they are infused with hope and have hopeful endings. A few examples include Louisana’s Way Home by Kate DiCamillo (scroll down page for review), More to the Story by Hena Khan (Goodreads Review), and Wishtree by Katherine Applegate (Goodreads Review).

2
Complex Issues

One of the main reasons I love reading middle-grade books is that they can address complicated and difficult issues in an easy-to-understand and sensitive way. It’s a great introduction to heavier content. A few examples include Jefferson’s Sons by Kimberly Brubaker Bradly (slavery), Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed (indentured servitude, education for girls), The War That Saved My Life/The War I Finally Won by Kimberly Brubaker Bradly (WW11), Stella by Starlight by Sharon Draper (racism, prejudice), Refugee (12+) by Alan Gratz (refugee crisis), Wonder by R.J. Palacio (physical differences), Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai (scroll down page for review) (immigrant, bullying), El Deafo by Cece Bell (hearing impairment), Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate (scroll down page for review) (homelessness), Front Desk by Kelly Yang (Goodreads Review) immigrant), Merci Juarez Changes Gears (Goodreads Review) (Alzheimer diagnosis), Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (prejudice)…and so many more.

3
Read in a Day

Most middle-grade reads can be read in a day by most adults. So if it’s December 28 and you’re a few books shy of meeting your year-end-challenge goal, pick up an easy reading middle-grade title such as The Vanderbeeker’s of 141st Street by Karina Yan Glasser, El Deafo by Cece Bell, or Wishtree by Katherine Applegate (Goodreads Review).

4
Conversation Starter

Instead of commenting on a girl’s beautiful dress, stunning nail color, or unique hairstyle or asking a boy if he is on a soccer team, try asking a middle-grade reader what book s/he is reading in class right now. You might be able to make a connection with that book or recommend a similar book and you’re off to an interesting discussion!

5
Palate Cleanser or Reading Slump Buster

After reading several heavy histfic books (just me?), intense thrillers, or dense nonfiction, you might be feeling burned out. A fast and engaging middle-grade read can jump-start your reading or give you the change of pace you are needing! I often use this strategy when I’m feeling ambivalent about choosing my next read.

6
Thoughtful Gift

Do you remember a book you received from a teacher or family member? I still remember the books I received! (I was the one that spent my entire winter break reading my new book!) Choosing the perfect book for someone is a thoughtful gift and is my favorite one-stop-shopping hack! A personal inscription and special bookmark can complete the gift.

7
Catch Up On a Popular Read

A great reason to read middle-grade books is to catch up on popular books you might have missed reading when you were in school. Have you read Chronicles of Narnia, Island of the Blue Dolphins, Bud Not Buddy, Little Women, Anne of Green Gables, Bridge to Terabithia, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, By the Great Horn Spoon, Wonder, Where the Red Fern Grows, Brown Girl Dreaming, The Secret Garden, The One and Only Ivan, etc? What book do you wish you had read when you were 8-12?

8
Quality Time

Children spell love T I M E.

Setting up a “buddy read” with your child, grandchild, niece, or nephew is one way to spend quality time with a child. To discuss the book, you might take the child to lunch or to get ice cream or set up a Zoom meet up. A buddy read doesn’t have to be extra reading outside of school. You could simply read the same book as s/he is reading in school so that you can ask questions about it. Reading books together leads to grand discussions about the most amazing topics/issues! I love that through reading, important and relevant issues come up naturally.

9
Important Conversations

What I love (and miss) most about teaching fifth grade is that I could have the best conversations with my budding abstract thinkers! Middle-grade readers (8-12) are ready to think about the world and their place in it. Through reading, children gain experience with different cultures, perspectives, and issues. I love the diversity now offered in children’s literature. Reading builds compassion and understanding. For instance, if your child’s classroom has a student who is hearing challenged, you could read El Deafo together.

10
Make a Difference

If you work with children, have children, or know children in the 8-12-year-old range, reading middle-grade books will help you connect with them! If you are a pediatrician, nurse, dentist, hygienist, teacher, aide, Sunday school teacher, piano teacher, counselor, social worker, caregiver, nanny, or work with middle-grade readers in any way, reading what they are reading will help build connections, promote literacy, and WILL make a difference.

Inspirational story: A member of our family took her baby to the doctor for her one-year checkup and the pediatrician said, “You need to read ten books every day to your baby!” Yay, doctor!Thanks for promoting literacy at a one-year-old well-baby check!

Have I encouraged you to pick up a middle-grade read or do you already love middle-grade lit?



QOTD:

What is your favorite middle-grade title?

What is your favorite middle-grade read from your school days?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



ICYMI:

10 Inspirational Reads For Middle-Grade March

Top Ten Signs That I’m a Book Lover

 Why getting lost in a book is so good for you according to science!



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and/or author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Signs That I’m a Book Lover #toptentuesday

March 31, 2020

Top Ten Signs That I’m a Book Lover

10 Signs I'm A Book Lover (image: tall stack of books on a blue painted table)

Before we get to the book talk, I’m curious if you are in isolation at home due to Covid 19 or are you an essential worker? Most of my family and I are at home. We do have four essential workers (three medical) in our family that we cover in prayer. God Bless the nurses and doctors, grocery store staff, and other essential workers!

Honestly, it’s been a little difficult to read with an anxious mind. Have you been finding it difficult to focus on reading? How are you practicing self-care? I discovered that I need lighter reads right now which will likely play havoc with my Spring TBR. This Top Ten topic listing the obvious signs that I’m a book lover is interesting because I’m definitely well prepared for isolation. Stay safe everyone! Wash your hands and don’t touch your face!

Top Ten Signs That I’m a Book Lover

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for TTT: Top Ten Signs I’m a Book Lover.

(listed in no particular order)

giphy-9

You know I’m a Book Lover because the first question I’ll ask you is “What are you reading now?” or “What is the best book you’ve read this year?” or another book-related question. My favorite topic is books and I’m prepared to use extreme tactics to steer the discussion in that direction.

 

giphy

You know I’m a Book Lover because you will always see me reading on my Kindle app in any waiting room or checkout line. I look forward to driving so that I can listen to an audio book. In fact, I’m never bored because I can always read!

 

giphy-8

You know I’m a Book Lover because I stay up way too late reading (and writing reviews). An additional sign that I’m a Book Lover is that I love to read “books about books”!

 

giphy-11

You know I’m a Book Lover because I think the book is better than the movie 99% of the time.

giphy-12

You know I’m a Book Lover because I have a Bookstagram account on Instagram with over 1,000 bookish friends and scroll Goodreads twice a day.

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10 Favorite “Books About Books” #toptentuesday

March 24, 2020

10 Favorite Books About Books for Top Ten Tuesday (Image: a tall stack of books on a blue table)

Top Ten Favorite “Books About Books”

Before we get to the book talk, I’m curious if you are in isolation at home due to Covid 19 or are you an essential worker? Most of my family and I are at home. We do have three essential workers in our family that we cover in prayer. God Bless the medical staff and grocery store workers!

Honestly, it’s been a little difficult to read with an anxious mind. Have you been finding it difficult to focus on reading? How are you practicing self-care? I discovered that I need lighter reads right now which will likely play havoc with my Spring TBR. This Top Ten topic involving a favorite genre is timely because most of the titles in this post could be considered lighter reads.

A Favorite Genre

Do you love the “book about books” sub-genre? If you are a bookworm like me, one of your favorite genres might be “books about books.” Here are a few of my favorites! Do we share any favorites?

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for TTT: Favorite Genre.

Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my reviews are linked.

(listed in order of favorites)

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)

Genre: Histfic (Kentucky) 5 Stars
What I Love: the fearless, feisty, determined, compassionate main character

Full Review Here

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Spring 2020 TBR

March 17, 2020

Spring Reading Season TBR (2020)

Open book with a spray of lilacs as a bookmark; Words: Spring TBR

Image Source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

For spring, these are the ten books prioritized on my TBR Mountain. They are a mix of genres, include three ARCs (advance reader copies), and most have been reviewed highly by others. I’m hoping for some winners here. Have you read any of these or is one on your TBR?

I never plan more than ten titles for my quarterly TBR lists because I need to leave time for mood reading and review commitments. These ten books (in no particular order) are a priority on a much longer general TBR.

What is your most anticipated read this spring?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Spring 2020 To Be Read List.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)


Spring 2019 TBR


The Salt Path by Raynor Winn

The Salt Path by Raynor Winn (cover)

Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir
***UPDATE: 4 Stars. Review coming soon.

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