Thankful For Family Themes in Literature #toptentuesday

November 24, 2020

Thankful For Family Themes in Literature

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Thanksgiving Freebie.

TTT 10 Books With Family Themes (Image: a father and mother sit on the ground and hold their small daughter on their shoulders)

Image Source: Canva

Families

This year during the Pandemic, most of us have appreciated our families more than ever. We’ve missed visiting them; we’ve missed family celebrations and milestones; we’ve been isolated at home with them; we’ve probably participated in or observed “drive by” parties; and some have lost loved ones during this year.

For this week’s TTT Thanksgiving prompt, my thoughts turn to how thankful I am for family…birth families…found families…blended families…adopted families…extended family…challenging or complicated families…all the families. This post is a collection of stories that focus on family and all its complexities.

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.



10 Books With Family Themes



We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter

(Throughout this WW11 historical fiction novel, the family is an important underlying theme; I especially love the poignant ending in this story!)
My 5 star review of We Were the Lucky Ones here.

we were the lucky ones


A Place For Us by Fatima Faheen Mirza

(A complicated, multi-generational family drama…on my lifetime favs list)
My 5+ star review of A Place For Us here.

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)


All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penney

(Family themes run deep in this latest installment of the Inspector Gamache series)
My 5 star review of All the Devils Are Here here.

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny (cover) Image: text over a background of a darkened Eiffel Tower against a swirly painted sky


The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai

(Family loyalty in this heart-wrenching, histfic Vietnamese story is compelling)
My review of The Mountains Sing here.

The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai (cover) Image: white text over a mountaineous background


Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love by Dani Shapiro

(A DNA discovery complicates relationships in this close family)
My review of Inheritance here.

Inheritance by Dani Shapiro (cover) Image: white text over a baby's christening dress


Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo (YA)

(A complicated and poignant story of discovered family)
My review of Clap when You Land here.

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo (cover)


Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

(The compelling story of a family troubled by addiction and mental illness)
My 5 star review of Transcendent Kingdom here.

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi (cover) Image: gold text on light pink (top half) and black (bottom half) background


The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg

(A heartfelt story of found family)
My review of The Story of Arthur Truluv here.

The Story of Authur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg (cover) Image: a man holds a yellow umbrella over a young woman


More to the Story by Hena Khan (MG)

(A modern retelling of Little Women from a Pakistani-American perspective…perfect mother/daughter read aloud with your middle-grade reader)
My Goodreads review of More to the Story here.

More to the Story by Hena Khan (cover) four girls lying on their backs forming a circle on the floor with their heads nearly touching


The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street (MG)

(A lighthearted, fun, and heartfelt family story….perfect for a read aloud with middle grade readers)

Vanderbeekers



….and so many more!

QOTD!

Do you love a book with family themes?

Do you have a rec to add to this list?



ICYMI:

My Year in NonFiction #nonficnov 2020

Fiction and Nonfiction Book Pairings #nonficnov 2020

Play the Expert: Memoirs and Biographies #nonficnov 2020

Adding Nonfiction Titles To My TBR #nonficnov 2020



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow. Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

The book covers are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

#NonficNov 2020: New Titles For My Nonfiction TBR

November 23, 2020

#NonficNov 2020: New Titles For My Nonfiction TBR

Nonfiction Nov 2020

I’m eager to participate in Nonfiction November this year hosted by Doing Dewey, Julz Reads, What’s Nonfiction, and Shelf-Aware.

During the month of November, you will notice one nonfiction focused post each week:

Weekly Topics:

My Year in Nonfiction 2020

Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings 2020

Playing the Expert: Memoirs and Biographies 2020

New to My Nonfiction TBR (today’s post)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Four New Nonfiction Titles For My TBR

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to reflect on the year, to celebrate and appreciate nonfiction, and to share recommendations.

I hope that you have enjoyed my focus on #NonFicNov and that you’ve found some new titles for your own TBR!

Today for Nonfiction November hosted by Doing Dewey, I have four nonfiction titles that I’m adding to my TBR! These are not all new releases…just new to my TBR.

In Nonfiction November, have you added any nonfiction titles to your TBR?

***This post contains Amazon affilliate links.


M E M O I R

I Have Been Assigned the Single Bird: A Daughter’s Memoir by Susan Cerulean

Thanks to Episode 295 of From the Front Porch (The Bookshelf, Thomasville, GA) for the rec!

I Have Been Assigned the Single Bird by Susan Cerulean (I(mage: one large and one small bird looking for food)


I N T R O V E R T S

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Thanks to Kristin @ Kristin Kraves Books for reminding me that I have been wanting to read this one!

Quiet by Susan Cain (Cover: red lettering on a soft blue background)


B I O G R A P H Y

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Thanks to Jonetta @ Blue Mood Cafe for reminding me of this book!

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (black lettering on a neutral background)


M E M O I R

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

The Choice by Dr. Edith Eva Eger (cover) Image: black text on a white background and a black stemmed reddish flower is placed on the entire left margin

Thanks to Nicki @ The Secret Library Book Blog for the rec! I couldn’t wait to start this one and I’m almost finished! Look for a review soon.



QOTD

What have you read for Nonfiction November?

Have you added any nonfiction to your TBR?



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW. ReadingLadies.Com

What is Your Reading Style?

 

November 20, 2020

Let’s Talk About the Reading Life!

What is your reading style (Image: someone is choosing a book from library shelves)

I’m in the mood to talk about reading today!

Knowing ourselves as readers leads to a more satisfying reading life.
Enjoy this reading video I saw on Facebook.

Are you a Supply or Demand Reader?

a girl pulling a wagonful of books

An episode of What Should I Read Next podcast discussed “supply” and “demand” reading styles. Supply readers love reading but they usually only read when they have great books in front of them (e.g. if a book catches your eye in the checkout line). Demand readers love reading and read everything…..the cereal box if that’s all that’s available. Demand readers deliberately search out and plan their next reads; whereas, supply readers will read when a book title presents itself and they think “Oh, I’ve heard the buzz about this and I think I’ll read it.” Or maybe they have received a book as a gift. Both types of readers love to read. I’m a definite demand reader….I aggressively search out my next book and don’t wait for it to make itself known to me. Are you a supply reader or demand reader?

What is your Reading Personality?

I did a DNA test and I found out I'm 100% bookworm

I took a quiz on the Modern Mrs. Darcey website and found out that I’m a “social” reader. I love to talk about the book I’ve just read, talk about my favorite books, or talk about what you’re reading. Most of the time, my preferred conversation starter is “What book are you reading?” This blog gives me a perfect platform to talk about the books I love.

If you’re curious about your reading personality, take this short quiz.

Are you a Genre Snob?

Don't you love it when a book kidnaps you?

Davida over at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Blog asked her readers this question recently and my immediate response was, “Yes! I think I am!” The more I read, the more I know what I like to read and I’ve grown in my ability to skip genres I don’t enjoy. Does this make me a snob or just a smart reader? I think knowing what you like and don’t like leads to a more satisfactory reading life and if this defines me as a snob I guess I’ll accept the label. However, what I don’t accept is putting down the reading choices of others….so if Genre Snob involves putting you down for your genre choice, I’m not a Genre Snob in this respect.

My favorite genres/categories: literary fiction, contemporary fiction, historical fiction, gentle mysteries, multigenerational and multilayered family drama, books about books or bookshops, (non-celebrity) memoirs and biographies, narrative nonfiction, and Middle Grade. My favorite themes include reconciliation, second chances, a hopeful future, resilience, courage, friendship, forgiveness, and found family.

Do you have Reading Preferences?

A book fort made of sheets and filled with stacks of books

Do you have a favorite reading spot or location? Does your reading involve a favorite drink or snack? Do you need it quiet or do you listen to music? Do you always read at a certain time of the day?

I can read anywhere! Quiet or noisy. TV on or off. At home or sitting in my car in a parking lot. Eating or not eating. If I’m drinking anything, it’s a Diet Dr. Pepper. I slightly prefer reading late at night when I know I won’t be interrupted and I can completely lose myself in the book, but you will find me reading at any time during the day. Perks of retirement! Some readers set aside a certain block of time every day for reading. Others read (listen) during their commute or on their lunch break. Whatever works for you is the only preference that matters.

Do you prefer Print (physical or e-reader) or Audio?

When I've had enough of reality, I just open a book

This is probably the only area in my reading life where I have a STRONG preference! Audio can either enhance your reading experience or detract from it.  Honestly, I have a difficult time with audiobooks and they are not my preferred reading format. My mind tends to wander. My favorite time to listen to audio is when I’m driving or walking. I’m also sensitive to the quality of the performance. I can think of a couple of audiobooks that had cringeworthy performers and I forced myself to finish those books. I usually listen at 1.25. I have found that the trick for audio is to start at normal speed until you get your bearings in the story and then increase the speed. Listening at a faster speed from the very beginning sometimes affects comprehension and your ability to get into the story. It takes me longer to read a book on audio than in print. Audio often puts me to sleep and then I have to backtrack to find my place. With print, I often scan a section or page, but that’s difficult to do on audio. Audio is great for commuters and readers who are washing dishes or folding laundry or exercising!

Are you a Rereader?

once upon a time there was a girl who really loved books. It was me. The end.

Some readers reread their favorite book every year! I’m usually not a rereader because of too many new books on my TBR. When I put a book on my lifetime favorites list, it’s probably one that I wouldn’t mind rereading.

Rereading makes me nervous….what if I don’t like it as much the second time? This happened to me with The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. I enjoyed the reread but I just didn’t love it in the same way I did the first time. One book I did enjoy rereading was The Deal of a Lifetime by Fredrik Backman. It’s a novella, so I read it three times in a row one afternoon. During the first read, I was preoccupied with the outcome of the story (the plot) and sort of devoured it. As soon as I finished, I immediately turned to the first page and reread it slowly to focus on Backman’s craftmanship. Then I read it a third time for good measure! I think I’m more tempted to reread because of the author rather than the content of the book. Some authors have more to offer than can be appreciated in one reading. Do you reread?

Are you a DNFer or a Finisher?

I disappear into books. What's your superpower?

I wrote an entire post on the DNF topic here.

I fall into the DNF (did not finish, set it aside) camp and I promise that it gets easier with practice!

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Have you experienced a Reading Slump?

She read books as one would breathe air, to fill up and live. ~Annie Dillard

You might be in a reading slump when you have difficulty finding a book that holds your interest, or you start multiple books without finishing them, or you spin your wheels trying to decide what to read next. Honestly, I don’t think I’ve ever experienced a true reading slump. For me, it would be like not wanting to breathe. If I find myself thinking I might be burning out and sliding toward a slump, I turn to Middle Grade! MG books are usually quick one day reads and have hopeful themes. Other readers report that what helps them in a reading slump is to reread their favorite book or switch genres or read short stories. Have you experienced a slump? Do you have a tip for dealing with a reading slump?

Do you often have Book Hangovers?

I finished my book and I don't know what to do with myself (a cat laying its head on a book)

I think book hangovers can contribute to reading slumps. A book hangover occurs when you can’t stop thinking about the last book you read or it was so good that nothing else compares. Book Hangovers help me determine my five star reads and add to my lifetime favorites list! I love Book Hangovers! Books this year that have given me a book hangover include Hamnet, The Girl With the Louding Voice, and Transcendent Kingdom. I haven’t yet finished The Choice by Edith Eger, but I already know it will give me a book hangover! What is the last book that gave you a book hangover?

Do you have a TBR List or are you a Mood Reader?

a black and white cat sleeps on a tall stack of colorful books

During the early months of the pandemic, I became more of a mood reader than I’ve ever been. Normally, I think I’m BOTH! Each season and each month, I make a list of a few books I’d like to tackle. This gives me some structure, but it also leaves plenty of room for mood reading or FOMO (fear of missing out)! If I don’t complete my TBR (to-be-read list), it’s no big deal. Sometimes I find that I simply don’t want to read the book anyway or I just put it onto the next month’s TBR. The only MUST READS I have are review commitments. I push myself in a timely manner to read those by their pub dates. Otherwise, I need my freedom! I actually like to think of my TBR as a possibilities list or a shopping list! A TBR keeps me from starting from scratch in the search for my next read or from the panic of thinking I have nothing to read! I wrote an entire post on “How I Choose My Next Read” here.

Do you set Reading Goals or Track your reading?

I've invented a new sport. It's called extreme reading and I'm a black belt (image of a man sitting reading with feet soaking on a bucket of water

I set a reasonable yearly reading goal on Goodreads each year. I set it at a reasonable number so that I never feel stressed about it. I can also raise or lower the goal number during the year. I love using Goodreads to track my reading because I can organize my reading by shelves and also write a review (optional) so that I remember and have a record of the book I’ve read. I like being able to pull up my Goodreads app when I’m with friends (to add a book rec) or while shopping. Check out my Goodreads shelves here and let’s be friends! I wrote a post about using Goodreads here. In addition to Goodreads, I also keep an Excel Spreadsheet 1) as a backup, 2) to track additional data, and 3) because I’m a nerd!

FAQ: How do readers read so much?

I spent my life folded between the pages of books (words surrounded with a border of flowers)

This is a question I often see asked and these are the most common responses: 1) schedule a time in your day to read, 2) people make time for the things they really want to do, and 3) take advantage of every minute! One of the reasons I enjoy reading on the Kindle is that I have the Kindle app on my phone and carry my entire library with me in my back pocket! In a pre-Covid time, if I were in a long line at the grocery store or Target, I would pull out my phone and read! Waiting rooms? Perfect for reading! Traffic? An audiobook to the rescue! Bath time for littles (who need a bit of supervision) equals reading time! Ditto for park excursions! Washing dishes or other household or yard chores are perfect opportunities for audiobooks! When my children were in middle school and old enough to go on rides by themselves at Disneyland, where was I? On a bench reading of course (along with a check-in time!). Taking advantage of all the little minutes adds up to significant reading time throughout the year. What tips do you have for making time to read?

Thank you to ShelleyRae @ Book’d Out for reminding me that one can always opt to do “less housework”!

I was going to clean the house, but then I realised.l..this book isn't going to read itself (Image: a young woman sits on the floor leaning against a cabinet reading a book)

What is Your Reading Style?

a woman lies reading on a tropical beach

Know you know all about my reading life! Have you determined your reading style? Do we share any preferences?



QOTD:

I’d love to hear about your reading life!



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or the WP follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry [Book Review] #throwbackthursday

November 19, 2020

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce
#throwbackthursday

the Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (cover) Image: purple and blue text on a light background with two small figures walking and a road in the distance

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Friendship, Life Reflection, Quirky Character

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m thrilled to share my review of the popular The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce…a reflection on life.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

In this well-loved story…

“Harold Fry is recently retired and lives in a small English village with his wife. After a long marriage, they have their differences but have settled into an amicable, predictable, and manageable daily routine. One day, a letter arrives for Harold from a woman (former co worker) that he hasn’t heard from in twenty years. Queenie is writing from a hospice to say goodbye. In the process of mailing his reply, Harold decides that he must deliver his message in person and decides to walk. As Harold impulsively sets out on his quest, he figures out the logistics of the six hundred mile journey as he goes. On the way he meets interesting people, finds plenty of time to reflect back on his life, and confronts some unsettling thoughts and feelings that he has buried.”

Shoe held together with duct tape

Continue here for my full review of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry ….



QOTD:

Have you read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry or is it on your TBR?

Nonfiction Books: Memoir/Biography #NonficNov

November 16, 2020

Nonfiction: Memoir/Biography #NonficNov

Nonfiction Nov 2020I’m eager to participate in Nonfiction November this year hosted by Doing Dewey, Julz Reads, What’s Nonfiction, and Shelf-Aware.

During November, you will notice one nonfiction focused post each week:

Weekly Topics:

My Year in Nonfiction 2020

Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings 2020

Be the Expert (today’s post)

Nonfiction TBR

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Nonfiction: Memoirs & Biographies

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to reflect on the year, to celebrate and appreciate nonfiction, and to share recommendations.

Playing The Expert: Today for Nonfiction November hosted by Rennie @ What’s Nonfiction, I am playing “the expert” and sharing books in a subgenre that I have read and highly recommend. These are my favorite memoir/biography recommendations. I chose them because they each share a personal story and help build my understanding of a specific life experience. Do you have a favorite memoir or biography?

Please join me for Nonfiction November!

15 Favotite Memoirs & Biographies for #NonFicNov (Image: text over a tall stack of books on a blue painted wooden table)

Background Image Source: Canva

15 Favorite Memoirs and Biographies:

The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee

(My review of Girl With Seven Names here)

The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee (cover)

The Choice by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

(I have just started this, but I already know it will be a favorite! Review coming soon)

The Choice by Dr. Edith Eva Eger (cover) Image: black text on a white background and a black stemmed reddish flower is placed on the entire left margin

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

A young readers version of Born a Crime here.

(My review of Born a Crime here.)

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (cover) Image: a casual Trevor Noah

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

(My review of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone here)

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb (cover)

Finding Chika: A Little Girl, an Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom

(My review of Finding Chika here)

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom (cover)

Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin

(My review of Wait Till Next Year here)

Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin (cover) Image: an old professional baseball stadium

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

(My review of Hillbilly Elegy here)

Hillbilly Elegy (cover)

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

Just Mercy movie here.

(My review of Just Mercy here)

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson cover

Unbroken: A WW11 Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

Unbroken movie and YA version here.

(Not reviewed because I read this before I started blogging or Goodreads)

Unbroken

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

The Glass Castle movie.

(My review of Glass Castle here)

Glass Castle

Educated by Tara Westover

(My review of Educated here)

Educated by Tara Westover (cover) Image: a giant sharpened pencil as background

Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion by Gregory Boyle

(Not reviewed because I read this before blogging or using Goodreads)

Tattoos on the Heart

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas

The Bonhoeffer movie.

(Not reviewed because I read this before blogging or using Goodreads)

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas (cover)

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (childhood memoir) (MG)

(My review of Brown Girl Dreaming here)

Brown Girl Dreaming

We Beat the Street: How a Friendship Pact Led to Success by Sampson Davis (The Three Doctors) (MG)

(Not reviewed because I read this before blogging or using Goodreads)

we beat the street



Related:

ICYMI: Here’s my post for last year’s “Playing the expert”: Nonfiction and Racial Injustice



QOTD:

See any favorites?

Have you read one of these titles?

I know you can help me add to this list! If my husband had helped with this list he would include titles by Ron Chernow for sure! Here, here, and here.

I’d love to hear your suggestions for a favorite memoir or biography.



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

The Thursday Murder Club [Book Review]

November 13, 2020

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (cover) Image: red and black lettering

Genre/Categories: Crime Fiction, Cozy Mystery

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Summary:

Quirky Characters meets Cozy Mystery meets Retirement meets Waiting For God

In an upscale, peaceful retirement village, solving cold cases is favored over jigsaw puzzles…..at least for our four lively, interesting, energetic, and brilliant protagonists who meet every Thursday. Elizabeth (leader, organizer, and previous spy?), Joyce (retired nurse), Ibrahim (retired psychiatrist), and Ron (a retired union boss) call themselves The Thursday Murder Club and enjoy pouring over files and discussing unsolved crimes. One day, there is a real murder nearby which leads to another murder even closer to home. The club lends its expertise, opinions, and energy to two professional detectives, Donna and Chris. These six form an investigative team of sorts. Guess which group is the most innovative?

My Thoughts:

(more…)

The Widows of Malabar Hill [Book Review] #throwbackthursday

November 12, 2020

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
#throwbackthursday

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey (cover) Image: a young woman in Indian dress and holding a brief case stands in front of a gated archway

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, Mystery, Detective, Bombay, Women’s Rights

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m thrilled to share my review of The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey…a mystery inspired by the first female lawyer in India.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

My Summary:

Perveen Mistry and a challenging case…

“In this culturally rich, mystery set in 1920s Bombay, India, Preveen Mistry, the daughter of a respected family, joins her father’s law firm, becoming one of the first female lawyers in India. Educated at Oxford, Perveen has a tragic personal history that causes her to be extra vigilant on her new case so that the widows of Malabar Hill are treated fairly after the death of their husband.  As she examines the paperwork, she discovers that the widows who are living in purdah (strict seclusion) have signed over their inheritance to a charity, raising suspicions that they’re being taken advantage of by their guardian. Tensions build and a murder occurs. Because the widows feel uncomfortable speaking with male investigators, Perveen takes responsibility and great personal risk to determine what really happened on Malabar Hill. Throughout the story, readers are also filled in on Perveen’s back story as readers are introduced to her family and friends and learn about her education.”

Continue here for my full review of The Widows of Malabar Hill ….



QOTD:

Have you read TheWidows of Malabar Hill or is it on your TBR?

Book Titles and Songs #toptentuesday

November 10, 2020

Book Titles and Songs

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Book and Song Titles.

TTT: Book Titles and Songs (Image: a tall stack of books on a blue painted wooden table)

Do you like music?

I’m spinning this week’s TTT prompt a bit to highlight six books that have music as a theme, one title that reminds me of a song, and three book titles that would make great song titles.

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.



6 Books With Music Themes



The Music Shop by Rachel Joyce

Frank is dedicated to preserving vinyl and owns a music shop in a run-down London neighborhood. His special gift is recommending just the right record or song for each customer. There’s a playlist, too!  My full review of The Music Shop here.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

As we follow Frankie through his life, we also hear about many music legends. Yes, there’s a playlist! My full review of Frankie Presto here.

The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir by Jennifer Ryan

As the men are called to action in WW11, the ladies of Chilbury resurrect the choir. My full review of Chilbury Ladies’ Choir here.

Musical Chairs byAmy Poeppel

Women’s fiction, complicated family drama, and a string trio. My Goodreads review of Musical Chairs here.

The Ensemble by Aja Gabel

A string quartet and four friendships. My review of The Ensemble in this post.

She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh

How Dolly’s songs tie to Feminism and how they resonated with women of a certain generation and socioeconomic status. My review of She Come By It Natural here.

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Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings: #NonficNov 2020

November 9, 2020

Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings #NonficNov 2020

Nonfiction Nov 2020

I’m eager to participate in Nonfiction November this year hosted by Doing Dewey, Julz Reads, What’s Nonfiction, and Shelf-Aware.

During the month of November, you will notice one nonfiction focused post each week:

Weekly Topics:

My Year in Nonfiction 2020

Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings (today’s post)

Be the Expert

New to My Nonfiction TBR

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Fiction and Nonfiction Book Pairings

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to reflect on the year, to celebrate and appreciate nonfiction, and to share recommendations.

Today for Nonfiction November hosted by Julz Reads, I have thirteen fiction/nonfiction book pairings to share with you! Can you add to this list?

Please join me for Nonfiction November!

13 Fiction & Nonfiction Book Pairings (Image: a top view of an assortment of hardcover books)

Image Source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affilliate links.


D I S A S T E R!

A Fall of Marigolds by Susan Meissner
paired with
The Only Place in the Sky by Garrett Graff

A Fall of Marigolds by Susan Neissner (cover) White test on a blue background vordered on three corners with marigolds

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11 by Garrett M. Graff (cover)


E S C A P E !

American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins
paired with
The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee

American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins (author)

The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee (cover)


Refugees

Inside Out and Back Again by Thannhha Lai and Refugee by Alan Gratz
paired with
Family in Six Tones by Lan Cao

Inside Out & Back Again y Thannha Lai (cover) ....a girl holding onto a tree trunk with one hand on a breezy day

Refugee by Alan Gratz (cover) a boy with his back to the camera in the hull of a small red boat on a stormy ocean)

A Family in Six Tones by Lan Cao (cover) Image: a mother holding a young girl in her arms...both smiling at the camera


A M E R I C A N 
H I S T O R Y

Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie
paired with
Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
(then watch Hamilton the Musical!)

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow (cover) Image: a portrait of Hamilton


C E L E B R I T Y

The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin
paired with
Gift From the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

the Aviator's Wife by Melanie Benjamin (cover) Image: a woman wearing a hat and in a blue dress (holding a purse and a travel bag) walks beneath the propeller of a small aircraft

Gift From the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh (cover) black text over a blue and pink background (a seashell above the title)


A M E R I C A N 
H I S T O R Y

America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie
and Jefferson’s Sons by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (MG)
paired with
Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham

America's First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

Jefferson's Sons by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (cover)

Thomas Jefferson The Art of Power


W O R L D  W A R  1 1

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini
paired with
Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini (cover)

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas (cover)


T R U E  C R I M E

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate
paired with
Before and After: The Incredible Real-Life Stories of Orphans Who Survived the Tennessee Children’s Home Society by Judy Christie and Lisa Wingate and The Baby Thief by Barbara Bisantz Raymond

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate (cover)

Before and After by Judy Christie and Lisa Wingate (cover) Image: a small girl stands on a cobblestone street holding a brown suitcase

The Baby Thief by Barbara Bisantz Raymond (cover) Image: a woman walks away from the camera holding the hands of two small girls


C O M P L I C A T E D  F A M I L Y 

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway
paired with
Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love by Dani Shapiro

Far From the Tree by Robin Benway (cover) Image: black text oveer an kaleidoscope of pinkish/red leaves

Inheritance by Dani Shapiro (cover) Image: white text over a baby's christening dress


P H O T O G R A P H Y

Learning to See: A Novel of Dorothea Lange by Elise Hooper
paired with
Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits by Linda Gordon

Learning to See by Elise Hooper (cover) Image: a woman with a camera stands on top of a car, shading her eyes for a better view

Dorothea Langue: A Life Behond Limits by Linda Gordon (cover) Image: a woman sits on top of a car looking through a camera lens


B I O G R A P H I C A L

Becoming Mrs. Lewis by Patti Callahan
paired with
A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis

Becoming Mrs. Lewis by Patti Callahan (cover) Image: a woman in a red dress and red hat walks away from the camera

A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis (cover) black and white image of roses on a white cover trimmed in gold


A B O L I T I O N  O F  S L A V E R Y

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
paired with
Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery by Eric Metaxas

The Intention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (cover) (white lettering over a goldish redish sky background) featuring a few small flying birds)

Amazing Grace by Eric Metaxas (cover) Image: portrait of William Wilberforce


A F G H A N I S T A N

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi
paired with
The Underground Girls of Kabul by Jenny Nordberg

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi (cover) Image: a woman and young firl in Arab dress walk across a desert

The Underground Girls of Kabul by Jenny Nordberg (cover) Image: school age kids hanging around next to a wall



QOTD

I know you can help me add to this list!
I’d love to hear your suggestions for a fiction/nonfiction pair.

If you have a nonficnov post, please leave your link in comments.



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



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Lemons [Book Review]

November 6, 2020

Lemons by Melissa Savage

Lemons by Melissa Savage (cover) Image: yellow title on blue background; a drawing of a boy (holding binoculars up to his eyes) and a girl (holding two lemons up to her eyes

Genre/Categories: Middle-Grade Fiction, Friendship, Adventure, Grief

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Summary:

“When life gives you lemons, make lemonade!”

lemons (two whole and one cut)

Ten year old Lemonade Liberty Witt believes her mom about making lemonade when life gets difficult. However, Lemon faces circumstances that test her lemonade-making abilities. After the death of her mother, she is sent to live in another town with a grandfather she’s never met. Her life gets better when she makes a new friend, Tobin Sky, who is CEO of Bigfoot Detectives, Inc. Yes, there have been suspected Bigfoot sightings in this wooded Northern California community! Lemon becomes Tobin’s assistant, but they discover something more important than Bigfoot.

My Thoughts:

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