6 Favorite Historical Fiction in 6 Months [2022] #6BooksIn6Months #ThrowBackThursday

June 23, 2022

6 in 6 [2022]

6 Best Histfic in 6 Months (collage of covers)

The Six in Six is a meme created by Jo at The Book Jotter At the end of June, we are halfway through the year,  so the idea is to share the books we have read in these first 6 months. When I looked at my list of the top 6 so far this year, I realized that they were all Historical Fiction. You’re not really surprised, are you?!

I’m also linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #ThrowBackThursday (since I’ve previously reviewed 4 of the 6 titles).

In the true spirit of the 6 in 6 meme, we are asked to share 6 books in 6 categories. Coming up with 36 books will take more brain power than I have available right now, so I will share 6 of the best (most memorable) historical fiction books I’ve read so far this year. Bonus: At the end of the post, I’m sharing 6 books in 6 more categories!

If you need to fill your beach bag or your summer TBR, I hope you’ll find something here to match your reading taste! I highly recommend each one!

***Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links.

a cartoonish number 6

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Track Your Reading: Goodreads or Story Graph? #LetsTalkBookish #LetsDiscuss2022

May 27, 2022

How Do You Track Your Reading?
Or Do You Track Your Reading?

How Do You Track Your Reading (white text over a young woman holding a towering stack of books)

Image Source: Canva

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

This post is inspired by the Let’s Talk Bookish topic hosted by Aria @ Book Nook Bits. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight. Finally, Bec @ Bec&Books has also inspired me to share my experiment and thoughts about Goodreads and Story Graph.

Let's Talk Bookish graphic

2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

In my opinion, tracking your reading is a satisfying part of the reading life. Why?

  • Tracking allows you to notice how your tastes and habits change over time
  • Tracking encourages you to balance your reading life (fiction vs nonfiction, diverse reads, etc.)
  • Tracking holds you accountable (in the very best ways)
  • Tracking appeals to readers who love stats and lists
  • Tracking encourages reflection

How do you track your reading?

  • Some readers track their reading by creating a unique hashtag on Instagram for their pictures
  • Some readers use a commercial Reading Journal (like this one for example)

Book Journal Sample Page

  • Some readers make their own reading journals using a blank notebook like this one  (Bullet Journal approach)
  • Some readers use an app such as Goodreads
  • Some readers use an Excel spreadsheet
  • Some readers take screenshots and save them in their camera rolls
  • Some readers simply make a list somewhere

There is not one preferred method for tracking. It’s whatever works for you. I use Goodreads, Story Graph, and an Excel Spreadsheet. Overkill?!?!

Tracking Apps: GoodReads Vs. Story Graph

For years, I have used Goodreads (GR). Other book tracking platforms have attracted my attention from time to time, but I was never tempted until Story Graph (SG).

Story Graph seems to be gaining a great deal of traction in the book community, so I devoted last year to using BOTH Goodreads and Story Graph to compare and contrast.

Pros and Cons of GR and SG:

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Ten Memorable Book Quotes [Volume 3] #toptentuesday #BookQuotes

May 24, 2022

Ten Memorable Book Quotes

Are You a Quote Collector?

10 Favorite Book Quotes text over a background of pink roses

Background Image Source: Canva

Enjoy a few of my favorite and memorable quotes today!!

Do you have a favorite or memorable book quote?

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for TTT: Ten Favorite Book Quotes.
(Oops! I have 12!)

Previous “favorite quotes” posts: Volume 1, Volume 2

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links

“As a devoted reader, I know what it is for books to shape you–the person you are, the person you were then. For readers, the great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other readers you’ve been.”

~ I’d Rather Be Reading, Anne Bogel

“As every reader knows, the social contract between you and a book you love is not complete until you can hand that book to someone else and say, Here, you’re going to love this.

~ These Precious Days, Ann Patchett


“For what are we born if not to aid one another?”

~ For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway


“The older I get, the more I believe that the greatest kindness is acceptance.

~ A Piece of the World, Christina Baker Cline


“Kindness begins where necessity ends.”

~ The Lincoln Highway, Amor Towles


“Some people in life, Sue, are weather forecasters; whereas, other people are the weather itself.”

~ The Man Who Died Twice, Richard Osman


“Happiness arrived with the discovery of language.”

~ The Complete Story of My Life, Helen Keller


“The Day we stop fighting for others is the day we might as well pack it all up and go home.”

~ The Last Train to Key West, Chanel Cleeton


“Maybe joy was catching, and all it required was a well-meaning heart and plenty of friendship. Maybe it was something that couldn’t be stamped out, even in the worst of times.”

~Red Sky Over Hawaii, Sara Ackerman


“Tomorrow will be better than today. I have value and I’m important.”

~ The Girl With the Louding Voice, Abi Daré


“It does not seem that I can trust anyone,” said Frodo. Sam looked at him unhappily. “It all depends on what you want,” put in Merry. “You can trust us to stick with you through thick and thin to the bitter end. And you can trust us to keep any secret of yours closer than you keep it yourself. But you cannot trust us to let you face trouble alone, and go off without a word. We are your friends, Frodo.”

~ J.R.R. Tolkien


“”Today was a Difficult Day,” said Pooh.
(pause)
“Do you want to talk about it?” asked Piglet.
“No,” said Pooh after a bit. “No, I don’t think I do.”
“That’s okay,” said Piglet, and he came and sat beside his friend.
“What are you doing?” asked Pooh.
“Nothing, really,” said Piglet. “Only I know what Difficult Days are like. I quite often don’t feel like talking about it on my Difficult Days either.”
“But goodness,” continued Piglet, “Difficult Days are so much easier when you know you’ve got someone there for you. And I’ll always be here for you, Pooh.”
And as Pooh sat there, working through in his head his Difficult Day, while the solid, reliable Piglet sat next to him quietly, swinging his little legs…he thought that his best friend had never been more right.”

~ A.A. Milne


Bonus: I Must Include My Very Favorite!

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”

~ Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, Mary Ann Shaffer


ICYMI:

Find my previous collection of quotes in these posts: Quotes Volume 2 and Quotes Volume 1.

What is one of your favorite quotes?



QOTD:

Please share your favorite quote in the comments!



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and/or author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

To Annotate or Not to Annotate [Discussion] #LetsTalkBookish #LetsDiscuss2022

April 20, 2022

Do You Annotate?

Pros and Cons

To Annotate or not to Annotate (white text over the background of a stack of hardback books)

Image Source: Canva

Some readers annotate and some do not.

What is annotating?
What is the purpose of a
nnotating?
How do you annotate?
Why annotate?

I love discussion posts, and many of my favorite bloggers participate in Let’s Talk Bookish and the Discussion Challenge. Do you love discussion posts?

As I reflect, think about your experience. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

This post is inspired by the Let’s Talk Bookish topic hosted by Aria @ Book Nook Bits. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

Let's Talk Bookish graphic

2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

What is Annotation?

Annotation is simply interacting with the text to find meaning as you read.

What is the difference between Annotation, Highlighting, and Note-Taking?

All three are forms of interacting with the text for the purpose of increasing comprehension and constructing meaning. All three facilitate communication between the author and the reader.

Annotation occurs right on the page and involves a system of symbols. Love something? Put an exclamation point in the margin. Confused? Add a question mark in the margin. Don’t know a word? Circle it.  Love a thought. Add a heart to the margin. Want to remember a quote? Underline and put a star in the margin. Disagree? Place a sad face in the margin. Do you see steps or a list of reasons? Number them. Do you notice a potential theme developing? Mark it with a “T.” Etc. In the days when I was reading physical books, I always read with a pencil in hand (except for library books of course!). You can make up your own set of symbols for annotating.

a poster of annotation symbols

Highlighting: Use a highlighter or different color highlighters to highlight certain sections, words, phrases, and concepts. The danger of this is that you might not remember why you highlighted a certain part. Or you might be a 5th grader who loves to use a highlighter and indescriminately highlight an entire page or pages! (Come on! I know you remember doing that!) If you are reading on a kindle, you can use the highlighting tool (and actually export these highlights!). As an alternative to a highlighter you could use book darts to mark a line or a post-it to mark a page or write a note. If you are an audio book listener, you can bookmark a certain location (or write the location in a note on your phone) and put it in physical note form later.

Note-Taking: When I take notes, I like to divide my paper into sections for characters, setting, themes, quotes, etc. Downsides to taking notes: it’s more laborious than other methods and they can be misplaced! So I recommend a spiral you can use as a book journal for note taking. In theory, it’s more difficult to lose an entire journal than a scap of paper.

Do I Annotate?

Absolutely!
Well, this needs a clarification. When I used to buy physical books, I annotated them all. Now I read digital books and need to rely on highlighting or note-taking. However, of all the methods I love annotating the most. I love picking up a book I’ve read and seeing all the annotations! Have you ever bought a used book filled with annotations?

Why Do I Annotate?

The main reason I annotate is to promote comprehension and construct meaning. In other words: to retain, question, react, or respond. When I taught 5th grade, I required my students to annotate. I loved that we had “consumable” social studies textbooks so that I could teach them to use an annotation system of special marks. There are charts of marks you can access or simply make up your own! Annotation is a form of communication with the author and the best comprehension tool. Related: When I was a student, I always took extensive notes and often I came home and rewrote my notes. The act of physically moving the pencil on paper builds comprehension and meaning. Have you found that to be true in your life? This same principle applies here!

Reviewing Tip

For writing reviews, it is imperative that I use one of these three methods for interacting with the story. My notes, annotations, and/or highlights jog my memory of the reading experience, jump start my review, and give me examples to site or quotes to highlight.

The Cons of Annotating

Well, the obvious con is that you don’t want to write on the pristine pages of your book! I promise it’s ok to mark up your book! Permission granted! Annotating will make your reading experience more meaningful and increase the sentimental value of your book. Another con might be the investment of time. However, if time spent results in a more satisfying reading experience, isn’t it worth it? Honestly, I can’t think of another con. Can you? If you don’t annotate, can you share why?

TL;DR

Interacting with the text in whatever way possible adds meaning to your reading experience.
Highly recommended!

QOTD: Do You Annotate, Highlight, or Take Notes?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

Books About Sisters #NationalSiblingsDay #Sisters

April 10, 2022

Books About Sisters

Books About Sisters (two sisters lie on their backs with heads touching)

Image Source: Canva

#NationalSiblingsDay

I’m celebrating National Siblings Day with a post about sisters! I love reading books about complicated family drama and I especially love stories featuring sisters!

             By My Side

I have two Siblings….two treasured Sisters. In the picture below, I’m standing and my two sisters are seated on either side of our mom. This pictures was taken in the “before” times. You see, my sister Jollene (seated on the left) is now in Heaven. Dearly loved and gone too soon.

three sisters and mom

*Titles are links to my review or Amazon affiliate links.



Books About Sisters



(In no particular order)

Daughters of War by Dinah Jefferies

(histfic: WW11)

Daughters of War by Dinah Jefferies (cover) Image: a woman stands with her back to the camera in a field with trees and a house on a hill in the distance

The Good Sister by Sally Hepworth

(contemporary thriller)

The Good Sister by Sally Hepworth (cover) Image: a young girl peers out the window of a house at the red roses growing in the garden

Three Words For Goodbye by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

(comtamporary women’s fiction: Europe)

Three Words For Goodbye by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb (cover) Image: two young women holding promotional materials and wearing hats stand next to a railing on an ocean liner

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National Library Week 2022 #BooksAboutLibraries #NationalLibraryWeek #TopTenTuesday

April 5, 2022

National Library Week: April 3-9

National Library Week (image: a hand chooses a book from library shelves)

Image Source: Canva

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday “Freebie.” In celebration of National Library Week, my “freebie” topic is Books About Libraries and Librarians.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Do you have a library card?

Do you have more than one library card?

Do you have fond childhood memories of bringing home a pile of books from the library?

As a child, did you participate in a summer reading program at the library?

Have you ever taken your child to storytime at the library?

Have you ever gone to the library to study or research or for some quiet time?

Do you belong to a book club at the library?

Do you consider yourself a heavy library user?

Is your library card one of the prized possessions in your wallet?

Did you use your library more or less during the Pandemic?

What percentage of the books you’ve read this year are from the library?

National Library Week Graphic

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Even though I’ve switched over to reading digitally, I consider myself a heavy library user. In fact, over 50% of the books I read in a year are from the library.

The BEST feature of using your libraries digital lending app (like Libby or Overdrive) is that there are NO library fines because the book automatically disappears (is returned) on the due date.

Another benefit is that you can link up multiple library cards. I have two library cards linked, one for my local library and one for my county library.

Do you borrow books physically or digitally from your library?

Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore, achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life.
~Sidney Sheldon

giphy



Books About Libraries and Librarians



The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

5+ Stars. My Review Here. (the main character is a packhorse librarian)

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)


The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

5 Stars. My Review Here. (a teenage girl assumes responsibility for the underground library of Auschwitz)

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)


What You Wish For by Katherine Center

4 Stars. My Goodreads Review. (the main character is a school librarian)

What You Wish For by Katherine Center (cover) Image: bright flowers and the edge of a gold ferris wheel bordering a bright blue background


The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams

4 Stars. My review here. (multigenerational library friendship and one special book list)

The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams (cover) white text overe a graphic image of scattered open books


Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr

 4.5 Stars. My review here. (libraries of the past, present, and future)

Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr


The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson

4  Stars. My review here. (saving a library)

The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson (cover) Image: white block text on a blue background....the letters represent three bookshelves holding books and scenes from the library


The Library Book by Susan Orlean

(narrative nonfiction account of the 1986 fire at the Los Angeles Public Library). Not reviewed.

The Library Book by Susan Orlean (cover) Image: Gold lettering on a red background


The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles

4 Stars. My review here. (a library and the French Resistance)

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles (cover) Image: a woman sits on a wall with her back to the camera overlooking the Eiffel Tower in the distance


The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne

4.5 Stars. My review here. (surviving a blizzard in a library)

The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne (cover) white text over a background of shelved books


The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis

3 Stars. My review here. (the iconic New York City Public Library is the setting for this histfic story)

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis (cover) Image: a woman in a yellow dress stands with an open book inside a large museum type room



QOTD!

Do you have a library card?

Do you use Libby or Overdrive?

What is your favorite book about libraries or librarians?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© Readingladies.com

Meet the Blogger [Book Tag]

March 22, 2022

Meet the Blogger Book Tag

a graphic picture of a blond girl holding an open blue book

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Between the dire and heartbreaking news from Ukraine and concerns about my 6 week old granddaughter who is in the hospital with RSV (she’s doing better today!), my reading/reviewing/posting mojo has suffered. So, I think a change-of-pace book tag might be needed!

A huge thank you to Esther @ Cozy With Books for tagging me in this!
Shoutout to Bibliomavens as the creator behind the Meet The Blogger Book Tag!

If you enjoy this tag, feel free to join in and definitely check out Esther’s blog too

Rules

  • Nominated bloggers can nominate ten other bloggers.
  • Use the same questions from the tag.
  • Tag the original creator (Bibliomavens) and the blogger who tagged you (Thanks, Esther!)

Who is your all-time favorite book character?

The first book characters I remember loving include Jo from Little Women, Scarlett from Gone With the Wind, and Nancy from Nancy Drew.

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10 Women Authors and Their Debuts #TopTenTuesday #WomensHistoryMonth #InternationalDayOfTheWoman

March 8, 2022

Women Authors and Their Debuts

Women's History Month: Debut Authors (Image: two women standing at the edge of a bluff looking out over the ocean)

Background Image: Canva

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl but going rogue!

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Do you have a favorite debut author?

Too many! Amirite?!

I’m going rogue today with Top Ten Tuesday because I want to acknowledge International Day of the Woman as part of Women’s History Month.

Publishing was a field for men. In publishing history, there was a time when women authors could not get published. Women were not allowed to sign their own contracts, did not receive equal pay, and were forced to write under pseudonyms. For International Day of the Woman, I’m focusing on modern women authors and their debuts as we celebrate those who fought hard for the right to be heard, sign their own contracts, and publish under their own name for equal pay.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Let’s celebrate women authors!
I’ve listed a few (recent) notable debuts in no particular order.

1

Fatima Farheen Mirza
Debut: A Place For Us

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

…complicated family drama

2

Yaa Gyasi
Debut: Homegoing

 

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi cover (yellow background with red and blue and black designs)

…multigeneraltional family saga

3

Angeline Boulley
Debut: The Firekeeper’s Daughter

The Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley (cover) Image: the profiles of two native american young People (man and woman) in cultural dress

indigenous people and the FBI

4

Anne Youngson
Meet Me at the Museum

…friendship and correspondence

 

5

Charmaine Wilkerson
Debut: Black Cake

Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson (cover) Image: white text over a multicolored graphic shapes background

…complicated family drama

6

Abi Daré
Debut: The Girl With the Louding Voice

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)

…finding your voice

7

Gail Honeyman
Debut: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…survival

8

Emma Lord
Debut: Tweet Cute

Tween Cute by Emma Lord (cover) Image: graphic of two apartment buildings shows a teen in each on social media

…YA romcom

9

Anissa Gray
Debut: The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls

…complicated family drama

10

Jane Harper
Debut: The Dry

The Dry

…mystery and suspense

***Edited to add #11

(One of my favs! How could I forget?!)

Cara Wall
Debut: The Dearly Beloved

Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (cover) Image: white text over an orange leafless tree with sprawling branches set against a bright blue background

…friendship

 



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these debut authors?
Do you have a favorite debut author?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature #TopTenTuesday

February 22, 2022

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature

Top Ten Tuesday 10 Favorite Dynamic Duos

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Dynamic Duos in Literature.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Who are your favorite Dynamic Duos?

Too many! Amirite?!

This is a FUN prompt! The following dynamic duos were the first to pop into my mind because if I overthink it, I’ll end up with a list of a hundred. See any favorites?

Who is your favorite dynamic duo?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

The Captain & Johanna
News of the World by Paulette Jiles
(the movie)

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky

…fighting with dimes! IYKYK

2

Ryland & Rocky
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…saving planets! IYKYK!

3

Jack & Wynn
The River by Peter Heller

 

The River by Peter Heller (cover) Image: white text over a background of red and dark blue swirly lines

survival!

4

Eudora & Rose
The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

…multigenerational friendship

5

Eleanor & Raymond
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…friendship at its finest

6

Eliza and Alexander Hamilton
My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

…true partners!

7

Nostagic:
Charlotte & Wilbur
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
(the movie)

 

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White (cover) Image: a graphic image of a young girl, a pig, and a spider

…childhood favorite!

8

Sophie & Barry
Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

…castaways!

9

Hazel & Duncan
Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

…overcoming obstacles, building trust, and facing challenges

10

A Dynamic Trio: Osla, Mab, and Beth
The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

 

a woman dressed in a rose dress stands with her back to the camera overlooking a balcony and a gold wall

…a dynamic TRIO of brave and smart women!



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these?
What’s one of your favorite dynamic duos?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book? 10 Books Too Good To Review Properly #TopTenTuesday #LetsDiscuss2022

February 15, 2022

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book?
What Makes a Book too Good to Review Properly?

10 Books Too Good to Review Properly" (white text over a background of a tall stack of hardback books)

 

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Books Too Good To Review Properly. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

 

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

Have you lost your heart in a book?
Have you been at a loss for words?

lose your heart in a book (white text above and below an open book with the center pages forming a heart...all on a lilac pink background)

Quite often when I attempt to write a review for a book I’ve really REALLY loved, I have a difficult time finding the right words to convey my thoughts. I’m lost for words! Whether you are writing a review or telling your best friend about a book, can you relate to my feelings? Which reviews are the most difficult for you? Which reviews are the easiest?

Why do I find it difficult to write reviews for books I’ve loved? It seems that writing a review for a book I loved should be the easiest to write. This is my reasoning for why it isn’t: I form an emotional connection with books I really really love. I leave a piece of my heart between the pages. A connection we make with a book is personal and when your heart is involved, it makes expressing thoughts coherently in a review more difficult. I fear you won’t feel the same connection or understand it.

The following list is a sample of the types of books I find it difficult to review because I’m lost for words. They are all 4.5-5 Star reads and are on my lifetime favs list and highly recommended. (reviews are linked)

What is one book you feel is too good to review?
Join the discussion in comments.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the poignant themes that gripped my heart….and that last father/son section…all the tissues

2

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom (cover) text on a dark background...vignette of a rowboat on the water

…difficult to review because…
uniquely personal and affects every reader differently

3

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede

The Day the World Came to Town

…difficult to review because…
the amount of kindness, sacrifice, and generosity is too much to list…also because it could have been any one of us on one of those planes that day…how many of you have received kind help from a stranger?

4

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (cover) Image:

…difficult to review because…
poignant end of life reflections

5

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the love for brave Eleanor and you have to experience the ending for yourself (IYKYK)

6

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell (cover) Image: head shot of a young boy wearing a felt hat and a large feather lies horizontally across his eyes

…difficult to review because…
so very emotional!

7

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…difficult to review because…
can’t give away the sacrificial friendship aspect…and BOOM (!) I’ve already said too much! (IYKYK)…
(trust me, you want the audio format for this one!)

8

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer

…difficult to review because…
Backman and the heartfelt and emotional content

9

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger
Finding Chika: A Little Girl, an Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom

…difficult to review because…
memoirs (how do you review someone’s life experience?)

10

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott (cover)

…difficult to review because…
(representative of all the incredibly difficult and emotional WW11 fiction I’ve read)
memorable characters, poignant themes



QOTD:

Have you read or reviewed any of these?
What’s one book you have found difficult to review?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



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***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com