Bloomsbury Girls [Book Review] #BlogTour

May 17, 2022

Bloomsbury Girls by Natalie Jenner

Bloomsbury Girls by Natalie Jenner (cover) Image: three women walk towards the camera arm in arm....a bookstore in the background and a large floral blossom in the foreground

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction (post-WW11), Book About Books, London, Bookshop

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Welcome to my stop on the Bloomsbury Girls Blook Tour. Thanks for the invite #AustenProsePR and thanks #Netgalley @StMartinsPress for a complimentary eARC of #BloomsburyGirls by Natalie Jenner upon my request. All opinions are my own.

Bloomsbury Girls Blog Tour Graphic

Bloomsbury Girls is a spin-off of The Jane Austen Society but can be read as a stand-alone. The story takes place in an old bookstore in post-war London. Bloomsbury books is run by men and the staff is dedicated to following the general manager’s fifty-one rules; however, the three women working there have their own ambitions and dreams. Because it’s the 1950s and women have been thrust into the workplace while men have been at war. women are often taking leadership and asserting their own ideas which may differ from the way things have always been done. At this very traditional bookshop run by men, stylish and creative Vivian, hard-working Grace, and scholarly Evie join forces to shake things up a bit, add their own flair, introduce new ideas and procedures, and chase their own dreams. As a bonus, there is plenty of name-dropping of (their) contemporary literary legends.

My Thoughts:

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The Jane Austen Society [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

May 5, 2022

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner
#throwbackthursday

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Janner (cover) Image: a grooup of five people (backs to camera) walk arm in arm; flowers edge the border

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Classics, Books About Books, England, Post WW11

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing a heartfelt tribute to a beloved classic author, The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

A love of writing and timeless stories draws people together….

Jane Austen’s final home was located in Chawton, England. In this imagined story that takes place shortly after WW11, a number of devoted Austen fans band together to preserve the home and her legacy. A local doctor, a young widow, a young farmer, a descendant of Austen’s, a young maid, and a movie star are among the group, and the story is told through their unique perspectives. Although they are very different from each other, they each share a deep connection with and a great love for the works of Austen.

charming and heartfelt….

Continue here for my full review of The Jane Austen Society..



QOTD:

Have you read The Jane Austen Society or is it on your TBR?

 

Sisters of Night and Fog [Book Review] #WomensHistoryMonth

March 1, 2022

Sisters of Night and Fog by Erika Robuck

The Sisters of Night and Fog by Erika Robuck (cover) Image: white text over a picture of two women walking away from the camera through a foggy night

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, WW11, Europe, Biographical, Espionage, Resistance

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @BerkleyPub for a complimentary eARC of #TheSistersOfNightAndFog upon my request. All opinions are my own.

An American socialite in France meets a British secret agent…..

Sisters of Night and Fog is the story of two real life, brave young women who join the Resistance Movement during WW11. Virginia d’Albert-Lake is married and lives in France, and adventure-seeking, nineteen-year-old Violette Szabo is a French citizen but lives in England. Because Violette is an expert with firearms and has dual citizenship, she is recruited by Britain’s secretive Special Operations organization. The two women eventually meet at Ravensbruck concentration camp.

Virginia and Violette

My Thoughts:

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The Holley Sisters of Thornthwaite Series #AVicarageChristmas #AVicarageReunion #AVicarageWedding #AVicarageHomecoming [Book Review]

January 28, 2022

The Holley Sisters of Thornthwaite Series by Kate Hewitt …..The “Vicarage” Series

Genre/Categories: Women’s Contemporary Fiction, Sisters, Family Drama, Village Life, England

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

As the title might suggest, each of the stories in the Vicarage series focuses on one of the four Holley sisters. Their father is the Vicar of Thornthwaite and Mom is the heart of this busy and complicated family. Each book in the series deals with a substantial theme or two including infertility, grief, social anxiety, finding your soul mate, broken relationships, unplanned pregnancy, forgiveness, reconciliation, etc. The strength of the stories and the thread that ties them together is the bond between the adult sisters and their commitment to family. Each book can be read as a stand alone, but as always reading them in order is a richer reading experience.

My Thoughts:

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The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman [Book Review]

September 3, 2021

The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson

The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson (cover) Image: white text on a blue background....graphic pictures of a car, a mic, a suitcase, a phone, and post it notes are along a winding road

Genre/Categories/Setting: Contemporary Fiction, Humor, Mother/Son, Road Trip, England

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

A memorable trip to find a father and honor a friend…

Twelve-year-old Norman Foreman and his best friend, Jax, have a five-year plan to become comedians and perform at the Endinburgh Fringe Festival. Jax is the wild one and is Norman’s first and only friend. They spend their time planning and practicing their comedy routine, with Jax as the funny one and Norman as the straight man. Sadly, Jax dies and Norman is bereft. Norman’s mom, Sadie, is a single mom and in her attempts to cheer up Norman, Sadie vows to get Norman to the Fringe (in honor of Jax) even though he would be a solo act and to finally track down Norman’s father (there are four possible candidates). Assisted by Leonard, a semi-retired janitor at work, Sadie plans the trip. The majority of the story follows this trio as they take a road trip to Edinburgh and make stops along the way to meet four different potential fathers and to give Norman practice opportunities at small venues. Will Norman find his father? Will he find the courage to perform at The Fringe without his best friend?

My Thoughts:

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The Gown [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

June 3, 2021

The Gown by Jennifer Robson
#throwbackthursday

The Gown by Jennifer Robson (cover) Image: top view of the bride with her long train walking down the aisle

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Royal Wedding, 1940s England

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a review of the fascinating story of the making of Princess Elizabeth’s royal wedding gown: The Gown by Jennifer Robson.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

The Gown is, in part, a behind-the-scenes story of the making of Princess (Queen) Elizabeth’s wedding gown. As the people of England endure a harsh winter and post war shortages and rationing, news of a Royal wedding brightens the country’s spirit. Told from two perspectives, we hear the imagined story of two young women who work for the famous fashion house of Norman Hartnell. Although the girls are accustomed to working on exclusive gowns for high profile clients and the Royal family, the newest assignment of a wedding gown for Princess (Queen) Elizabeth brings extraordinary pressure and excitement. A third perspective and modern timeline follows one of their granddaughters who travels to London a half century later to unravel her grandmother’s mysterious and secret past. There’s more to the story than the dress as the author gives us an idea of what life was like in 1940s London, and explores themes of friendship, family, and love.”

a wedding gown and so much more….

Continue here for my full review of The Gown

 



QOTD:

Have you read The Gown or is it on your TBR?

The Last Bookshop in London [Book Review] #BlogTour

April 7, 2021

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands beside a wall of bbookshelves near a window through which Big Ben and three WW11 planes are visible

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, WW11, London, Books About Books, “might also be a love story”

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thank you for my invitation to participate in the 2021 Historical Fiction Blog Tour for The Last Bookshop in London. Thanks, #NetGalley @HarlequinBooks for my complimentary e ARC of #TheLastBookshopInLondon by @MadelineMMartin upon my request. All opinions are my own.

Historical Fiction Blog Tour (4 covers)

The Last Bookshop in London is a book about bookstores and a book about books set during the London Blitz during WW11. Grace Bennett has always wanted to move to the city, but the life she finds is not nearly what she expected as she hunts for a job, endures air raid shelters, and puts up black-out curtains. The only job she can find is at Primrose Hill, a dusty, old bookstore with a curmudgeonly owner. Grace, not sure she even loves reading that much, organizes and cleans the bookshop, gradually develops a love for books, enjoys a friendly relationship with a handsome and well-read customer named George, finds ways she can contribute to the war effort and the book community, and discovers the power of storytelling during the most difficult times.

The magic of reading in George’s words:

“Reading is going somewhere without ever taking a train or ship, an unveiling of new incredible worlds. It’s living a life you weren’t born into and a chance to see something colored by someone else’s perspective. It’s learning without having to face consequences of failures, and how best to succeed.”

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas (cover)

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

My Thoughts:

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Meet Me at the Museum [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

March 18, 2021

Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson
#throwbackthursday

Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson (cover) Image: text in a wood frame...2 raspberries peek into a corner; frame sits on a plain seafoam green background

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Women’s Fiction, Literary Fiction, Epistolary, Friendship, England, Denmark, Archeology

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I look forward to sharing my review of a reflective story, Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson, in which strangers become friends.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

What is the chance that a letter to a stranger will lead to a deep friendship?

“Told in epistolary format, the story in Meet Me at the Museum unfolds from alternating viewpoints as we meet the two main characters through their letters. Tina is a hard-working, loyal, and duty bound English farmer’s wife, mother, and grandmother, and she is also grieving the recent loss of her best friend, Bella. In thinking of the past, she remembers the promise that she and Bella made to each other to visit the Silkeborg Museum in Denmark to see the mummified Tolland Man from the Iron Age. Life intervened and now Tina is in her 60s and her friend is gone. She is inspired to write to Professor Glob, author of The Bog People, who mentions school children in the dedication of his book (our fictional Tina is one of the school children). Tina isn’t aware that Glob has died, so quiet, kind, and introspective Anders, curator of the Denmark museum, writes back to Tina. Tina and Anders begin a thoughtful and heartfelt correspondence. Anders is grieving the recent loss of his wife and through letters, Anders and Tina share intimate details of their lives with each other and express thoughts that they have difficulty sharing with anyone else. As they discuss archeology, the Tolland Man, their philosophies of life, grief, and their families, they develop an endearing and unique friendship that could possibly lead to more.”

Letter writing: “holding onto the softness and elegance” of the old ways.”

Continue here for my full review of Meet Me at the Museum ….



QOTD:

Have you read Meet Me at the Museum or is it on your TBR?

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

January 14, 2021

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter by Hazel Gaynor
#throwbackthursday

the Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter by Jazel Gaynor (cover) Image: a woman looks out over a landscape which includes a lighthouse

Genre/Categories: Women’s Fiction, Contemporary Fiction, Domestic Life

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m eager to share my review of the compelling The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter by Hazel Gaynor.a story of strong independent women.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Inspired by true events, The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter shares the story of Grace Darling, an extraordinary young woman who helps her father keep the Longstone Lighthouse on the Farne Islands off the coast of northeast England. One day in 1838 during a furious storm, Grace and her father rescue nine shipwreck survivors. Grace gains notoriety and finds herself the subject of poems, ballads, and plays. The dear friendship that develops between Grace and one of the survivors and the survivor’s brother continues to impact lives 100 years later.

In 1938 at another lighthouse in Newport, Rhode Island, nineteen year old Matilda is sent away from Ireland in disgrace to live with a distant relative who happens to be an assistant lighthouse keeper. As Matilda stumbles upon an old chest containing artifacts from her family history, she uncovers the story of Grace and the connections Grace has to Matilda’s great-great-grandmother. Although Matilda’s part of the story is pure fiction, the hurricane that hits the east coast of the U.S. in 1938 is historic.

Author, Hazel Gaynor, creates strong connections between two time periods and two story lines including hurricane events of 1838 and 1938, complex connections between past and present family members, and lighthouse themes between the stories.

Even the brave were once afraid. The sum of generations of strong, courageous women who came before her, an echo of them all lingering in her soul.

Continue here for my full review of The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter ….



QOTD:

Have you read The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter or is it on your TBR?
Have you read other books by Hazel Gaynor?

Lady Clementine: A Review

January 10, 2020

 Lady Clementine: by Marie Benedict

Lady Clementine review

Genre/Categories: Biographical Historical Fiction, WW1 and WW11, England

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Thanks #netgalley #sourcebooks #sbkslandmark for a free e ARC of #ladyclementine in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

Summary:

Clementine Churchill is the devoted wife, partner, and best friend of Winston Churchill. Lady Clementine is brilliant, ambitious, innovative, and fascinating, and she devotes all her energy and loyalty to her husband and country.

My Thoughts:

An underappreciated woman in history….

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