Tweet Cute [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

April 21, 2022

Tweet Cute by Emma Lord
#throwbackthursday

Tween Cute by Emma Lord (cover) Image: two apartment buildings with a teen in each using social media on their phones

 

Genre/Categories/Setting: Contemporary Young Adult Fiction, Family Life, YA RomCom, Coming of Age, New York City

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing a sweet YA romcom, Tweet Cute by Emma Lord. (It’s my fav of her three books.)

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

grilled cheese sandwichThe setting is New York City. Pepper (Patricia) is the swim team captain at her private school, achievement-focused, and a perfectionist. Her family owns a large fast-food burger chain, and Pepper runs the twitter account. Jack is a classmate and fellow swim team member. He secretly develops apps, enjoys being a class clown, and experiences episodes of sibling rivalry with his twin brother. Jack’s family owns a small downtown deli. A few things happen to put the story in motion: the big burger chain copies (steals) Jack’s family’s grilled cheese sandwich, a twitter war ensues that Jack and Pepper instigate and fuel, and Jack and Pepper find themselves becoming close friends on the school’s app where identities remain anonymous.

You’ve Got Mail meets Tell Me Three Things meets With the Fire on High….

Continue here for my full review of Tweet Cute..



QOTD:

Have you read Tweet Cute or is it on your TBR?

 

Sea Wife [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

April 14, 2022

Sea Wife by Amity Gaige
#throwbackthursday

 

Sea Wife by Amity Gaige (cover) Image: a lagoon in the foreground and ocean expanse in the background

Genre/Categories/Setting: Contemporary Fiction, Family Life, Suspense, Sea Life, Living Off the Grid, Adventure

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing a complicated family drama, Sea Wife by Amity Gaige.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Juliet and Michael are disillusioned with work, life, and marriage for individual reasons, and even though they are novice sailors, they set out for a yearlong sailing venture with their two young children. Things are fine at first until the unexpected happens. (see original post for trigger warnings)

Juliet is more than a wife and more than her husband’s plans for their life. At sea, she finds her voice, survives difficult circumstances, and plants seeds for envisioning a fulfilling future….

Continue here for my full review of Sea Wife..

(including trigger warnings)



QOTD:

Have you read Sea Wife or is it on your TBR?

 

Mrs. England [Book Review]

April 12, 2022

Mrs. England by Stacey Halls

Mrs England by Stacey Halls (cover) Image: a young woman in a long white dress peeks around an open door

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, Women’s Fiction, Family Drama, Mystery/Thriller/Suspense

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Welcome to my stop on the #HTPBooks Harlequin Trade Press Publishing’s 2022 Blog Tour for historical fiction. Thanks #HTPBooks #Netgalley for a complimentary eARC of #MrsEngland upon my request. All opinions are my own.

Mrs England Blog Tour Banner

In 1904, Ruby May is looking for a fresh start and accepts a position in Yorkshire as a children’s nurse for the Englands, a wealthy couple who live in the isolated Hardcastle House. Although she builds a connection with the three children, something doesn’t seem quite right with the servants or between Mr. and Mrs. England.

My Thoughts:

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Books About Sisters #NationalSiblingsDay #Sisters

April 10, 2022

Books About Sisters

Books About Sisters (two sisters lie on their backs with heads touching)

Image Source: Canva

#NationalSiblingsDay

I’m celebrating National Siblings Day with a post about sisters! I love reading books about complicated family drama and I especially love stories featuring sisters!

             By My Side

I have two Siblings….two treasured Sisters. In the picture below, I’m standing and my two sisters are seated on either side of our mom. This pictures was taken in the “before” times. You see, my sister Jollene (seated on the left) is now in Heaven. Dearly loved and gone too soon.

three sisters and mom

*Titles are links to my review or Amazon affiliate links.



Books About Sisters



(In no particular order)

Daughters of War by Dinah Jefferies

(histfic: WW11)

Daughters of War by Dinah Jefferies (cover) Image: a woman stands with her back to the camera in a field with trees and a house on a hill in the distance

The Good Sister by Sally Hepworth

(contemporary thriller)

The Good Sister by Sally Hepworth (cover) Image: a young girl peers out the window of a house at the red roses growing in the garden

Three Words For Goodbye by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

(comtamporary women’s fiction: Europe)

Three Words For Goodbye by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb (cover) Image: two young women holding promotional materials and wearing hats stand next to a railing on an ocean liner

(more…)

Little Fires Everywhere [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

March 31, 2022

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
#throwbackthursday

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng (cover) I/mage: birdseye view of a pristine upper class neighborhood

Genre/Categories: contemporary fiction, family life, mothers and children, complicated family drama, transracial adoption

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing a complicated family drama, Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Shaker Heights, a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, strives to be a perfect planned community. In the words of the author, there is a “propensity to overachieve and a deep intolerance for flaws…a utopia.” Every winding road is thoughtfully laid out, the list of house colors is a strict guideline, trash pickup is conducted in the alleys and all trash cans are out of sight, and tradition is revered and informs the future. Generations of Elena Richardson’s family have lived in Shaker Heights, and she ensures that her family follows the rules and lives up to expectations. All through her life, she has followed the rules and this is wholeheartedly embraced as her highest value. Part of her personal code of following the rules is giving back to those that are less fortunate whenever she can, and she’s the type who keeps a mental list of her good deeds. Elena especially wants to use her inherited rental property near her home to benefit others. She earnestly seeks out renters that could gain from the advantage of living in her perfect neighborhood in Shaker Heights. Mia Warren, a free-spirited artistic non-rule follower, and her teenage daughter, Pearl, are the most recent beneficiaries of Mrs. Richardson’s benevolence. Although when Mia is less than grateful for Mrs. Richardson’s offer to buy one of Mia’s photographs, Elena Richardson makes a mental note and this slight continues to bother her and becomes a motivation for her future relationship with Mia. As the story unfolds, the two families become more involved with each other rather than simply remaining tenant and landlord. It becomes complicated.

A rule follower and a free spirit…

Continue here for my full review of Little Fires Everywhere..



QOTD:

Have you read Little Fires Everywhere or is it on your TBR?
Have you seen the mini series adaptation?

 

When You Get the Chance [Book Review]

February 25, 2022

When You Get the Chance by Emma Lord

When You Get the Chance by Emma Lord (cover) Image: white text over the background graphic of a girl with long brown hair dressed in a hot pink crop top and jeans....against a hot pink background with a sprinkling of yellow stars

Genre/Categories/Setting: Young Adult Contemporary Fiction, Musical Theater, Coming of Age, New York City

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Millie Price is a high school senior and is obsessed with musical theater. In her determination to follow her dream, she applies to a competitive program that will jumpstart her career as a Broadway star. Her usually supportive father is against the idea and won’t sign the paperwork. Millie has been raised by her single dad and her bio mom has never been a part of her life. So, Millie plans to find her bio mom who works in theater so she can persuade her to sign the papers. (even though she has no legal guardianship of Millie and Millie doesn’t even know her name….so suspension of disbelief is required here). At the same time, Millie is also persuing a summer internship in the theater world. Competing for the same internship is Oliver her rival from drama club. Will Millie secure the internship? Will she get the signature she needs to finalize her acceptance into the elite program? Will she find her bio mom? And what about Oliver?

My Thoughts:

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The Last Train to London [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 24, 2022

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton
#throwbackthursday

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton (cover)

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, WW11, Jewish, Nazi-Occupied Europe

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing one of my favorite inspirational historical fiction reads, The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Rescuing children, her life’s work…

The Last Train to London shares the story of real-life hero Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance who risked her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. (She was honored as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem. )

The mission known as Kindertransport carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. In addition to hearing about Tante Truus as she was known, the author imagines the lives of children such as Stephan (budding playwright), his younger brother. and Zofie-Helene (mathematics protegee).

Auntie Truus (headshot)Tante Truus: Image Source: Wikipedia

Courage isn’t the absence of fear, rather the going forward in the face of it…

Continue here for my full review of The Last Train to London…



QOTD:

Have you read The Last Train to London or is it on your TBR?

 

The Woman They Could Not Silence [Book Review] #NarrativeNonfiction #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge

February 18, 2022

Do you have Narrative Nonfiction on your bookshelf?

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore (cover) Image: white text on a black muted background....the small graphic image of a quill and ink below the title

Today for the #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge I’m focusing on “Narrative Nonfiction” (creative nonfiction or literary nonfiction) as I bring you a review of The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore.

Every year, I commit to reading more nonfiction. In nonfiction, I love Memoir, Biography, and Narrative Nonfiction. However, I think narrative nonfiction might be my favorite. After today’s review, I’ve included a few of my favorite “narrative nonfiction” titles.

Do you have a favorite Narrative Nonfiction title or recomendation?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


The Woman They Could Not Silence: One Woman, Her Incredible Fight for Freedom, and the Men Who Tried to Make Her Disappear by Kate Moore

Genre/Categories/Setting: Nonfiction, Narrative Nonfiction, Biographical, Mental Health, Women’s/Patient’s Rights, Insane Asylum (1860)

My Summary:

In 1860, wives and daughters could be committed to insane asylums by their husbands or fathers without their consent or proper mental health evaluations. Women were property owned by the husband or father. Women could be committed for being too emotional, opinionated, independent, zealous, or intellectual….basically, any woman who can’t be kept “in line.” When Elizabeth Packard is committed to an insane asylum by her husband, she discovers that she is not the only sane woman there. Because she is labeled “crazy,” no one will listen to her appeals or intervene on her behalf and she has no voice to fight for herself because it makes her appear even crazier. Her friends who may know the truth won’t speak up for fear of the same punishment from their husbands. However, after losing her home and her children, Elizabeth has nothing more to lose and is determined to fight for her life and for the lives of innocent women.

Elizabeth Packard

Elizabeth Packard

My Thoughts:

How far we’ve come! What a nightmare scenario for women! I became intrigued with this subject after I read Woman 99 by Greer Macallister. In that story, a daughter is commited to an insane asylum for being too emotional and her sister attempts a rescue. I knew I wanted to read more about women being unfairly committed.

First, What is Narrative Nonfiction?

“Narrative nonfiction, also known as creative nonfiction or literary nonfiction, is a true story written in the style of a fiction novel. The narrative nonfiction genre contains factual prose that is written in a compelling way—facts told as a story. While the emphasis is on the storytelling itself, narrative nonfiction must remain as accurate to the truth as possible” ~Source

Elizabeth:

Drawing heavily on court reports, newspaper articles, corresponsence, and journals, the author weaves a compelling story around the facts and Elizabeth’s own words. Through Elizabeth’s determination and fearless fighting spirit, she affects change for women. The resulting law reforms brought widespread, long-lasting change in the operation of insane asylums and granted married women the right of jury trial before commitment. Her fight and contributions should be remembered and honored.

Elizabeth is an incessent talker with strong opinions and a strong will. These were textbook examples of female insanity at the time. During her confinement, Elizabeth feels like an asylum is a “storage unit for unsatisfactory wives.” Women are deemed “cured” when they become “quiet, decorous in manners and language.” Using her brilliant mind and her ability to write, Elizabeth is determined “to write her way out of her hellhole if it is the last thing she does.” She demonstrates that “a spirit cannot be killed. With spirit comes hope. With spirit comes strength. With spirit comes the energy to start the fight for justice.”

“Wronged women were not supposed to stand up for themselves. Wronged women were not supposed to come out fighting, or be angry, or battle for injustice to be overturned. Elizabeth’s course was unnatural in [McFarland’s] eyes…and therefore insane.”

Elizabeth’s life is not without controversy. In her attempts to gain her freedom, she has a complicated relationship with McFarland, the director of the asylum, and uses many methods to manipulate, outsmart, and befriend him to achieve her freedom. He becomes her lifelong adversary.

Recommended: I definitely recommend The Woman They Could Not Silence for readers who appreciate stories about the fight for women’s rights and mental health reform and for fans of stories about strong and determined women making a difference. She fought for us all. Thanks to Shellyrae @ Book’d Out for the rec!

Content Considerations: domestic abuse, difficult passages about the mistreatment of patients and the lack of care for the mentally ill

My Rating: 4 Stars

twinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-star

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore

The Woman They Could Not Silence Information Here

Meet the Author, Kate Moore

Author Kate MooreAmong other books, Kate is the author of The Radium Girls, which won the 2017 Goodreads Choice Award for Best History, was voted U.S. librarians’ favourite nonfiction book of 2017 and became a New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller.

A British writer based in England, Kate writes across multiple genres including history, biography, true  crime and grift, and has had many titles on the Sunday Times bestseller list. Her work has been featured across international media and translated into more than fifteen languages. A born public speaker, Kate regularly tours her books and is equally at home spinning stories onstage as she is writing them on her laptop in London.



A Few of My Favorite Narrative Nonfiction Titles:

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann
The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede
The Only Plane in the Sky by Garrett M. Graff
Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson (part narrative nonfiction, part historical essay)



 I’m linking up with Deb @ Deb’s World and SueDonna, and Jo for the February installment of #WhatsOnYourBookShelfChallenge.

Whats On Your Bookshelf Challenge



QOTD:

Do you enjoy narrative nonfiction?
What is your favorite form of nonfiction?
Is The Woman They Could Not Silence on your TBR or have you read it?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

One-In-A-Million Boy [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 17, 2022

One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood
#throwbackthursday

One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood (cover)

Genre/Categories: Fiction, Family Life, Unique Characters

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing one of my favorite quirky reads, One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood. I included a brief review of this story in another post and now on the occassion of Throwback Thursday, I’m giving this review its own post.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Are you looking for a unique story?

An atypical 11-year-old boy is sent to help 104-year-old Ona every Saturday morning as part of a community service project. As he refills the bird feeders and helps with other odd jobs, he and Ona share cookies and milk and Ona tells him about her long life. He records her responses as part of a school interview project.

One Saturday, the boy doesn’t show up. Ona starts to think he’s not so special after all, but then his father arrives on her doorstep, determined to finish his son’s good deed.

My Thoughts:

Character Driven and Plot-Driven Balance: I love a character-driven story with enough plot to keep my interest. In the story, there are quirky characters to meet, relationships to figure out, a project to be completed, and a mission to achieve. It’s unique, heartfelt, memorable, and quirky; hopeful and bittersweet.

Structure: Told in a past and present timeline, the story has an interesting main character in that the boy is unnamed. This deliberate choice by the author left me pondering why. The boy is only half the story. The other half is about the boy’s father and his own relationship with Ona.

Themes: Important themes include the unlikely friendship between generations, loneliness, loss, grief, hope, healing, chosen family, and second chances.

Recommended: I’m recommending this unique story for fans of quirky characters, warm-hearted and endearing fiction, and chosen family.  One-In-A-Million Boy earned a spot as one of my favorites of 2016, and I’m urging you not to miss this memorable and uplifting story!

Trigger Warning: Loss of a child

My rating: 4.5 Stars

twinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-star

The One-In-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood (cover)

One-In-A-Million Boy Information Here

Meet the Author, Monica Wood

Author, Monica WoodI was born in Mexico, Maine, to a family of devout Irish Catholics, a family of paper mill workers. My father and my mother’s parents came from Prince Edward Island in Canada, and brought with them the island tradition of storytelling. Although my sisters and I were the first generation in the family to go to college, I think of my background as a literary one. My father had a lilting island brogue and beautiful grammar; the notion that stories had to be told in a certain way was something I learned early. My grandfather used to sing long, melodramatic, novelistic ballads, another island tradition. I am not one of those writers who claim to have been weaned on  Proust, but I did read a lot, a happy habit for a child, I think, no matter what the material.  http://www.monicawood.com/



QOTD:

Have you read One-In-A-Million Boy or is it on your TBR?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

 

 

 

 

The Last Grand Duchess [Book Review]

February 7, 2022

The Last Grand Duchess by Bryn Turnbull

The Last Grand Duchess by Bryn Turnbull (cover) Image: side profile of a woman wearing a white lace shawl and long strands of pearls

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Family Drama, Russia, the Romanovs

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Welcome to my stop on the @HTPBooks Harlequin Trade Press Publishing’s 2022 Winter Blog Tour for Historical Fiction. Thanks #NetGalley @HarlequinBooks for my complimentary eARC of #TheLastGrandDuchess upon my request. All opinions are my own.

The Last Grand Duchess is the story of Olga Romanov and the Romanov family in their last years. We hear about Olga’s sheltered life living with her parents and siblings. Often present is Grigori Rasputin, a controversial priest and friend of the tsarina. As Olga divides her time between suitors, home, elegant ballrooms, and hospitals, she and the family face increasing danger from political unrest and home confinement.

Olga Romanov sits at a table reading a book

Olga Romanov

My Thoughts:

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