Ten Books That Live Up To Their Hype #toptentuesday

September 28, 2021

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books That Live Up To Their Hype

10 Books That Live Up to Their Hype (white text on blue background over a background pictures of pink balloons against a blue sky)

Background Image Source: Canva

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Freebie!

Hype. Does it affect your reading?

My name is Carol, and I suffer from FOMO!

As a consequence, I often read books that are highly hyped. Sometimes this works out OK and other times….well….it leads to disappointment. I wrote this post about Buzz, Hype, and High Expectations here.

Today’s Top Ten Tuesday prompt is a freebie so I thought I’d revisit a topic I missed: Books That Live Up To Their Hype. All the books on this list I read because of the HYPE. They all lived up to their hype in my opinion. There are so many books I’ve read because of hype that I had to create a runners up list after I reached ten. So this post contains twenty recommendations! (and I could keep going!)

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.

Ten Books That Live Up To Their Hype

(in no particular order)

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10 Books I Wish I Could Read Again For the First Time #TopTenTuesday #LetsDiscuss2021

August 24, 2021

Do you love making lists?

10 Books I'd Like To Read Again For the First Time (Image: white text over a background of stacked hardback books)

Image Source: Canva

Top Ten Tuesday:
10 Books I Wish I Could Read Again For the First Time

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books I Wish I Could Read Again For the First Time and the 2021 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

2021 discussion challenge graphic (a blue bird and red fox and wall clock and stack of books graphic)

This is a difficult topic for me because I believe that first reads are best! I’m a “one and done” reader and I’m not a rereader (well…rarely a rereader). However, there are a few books I’d like to read again for the first time (if I had a time machine) simply to recapture the “book hangover,” the pleasure, or the memorable reading experience.

I’d love to hear from YOU!

If you had a time machine, what is the number one book you’d like to read again for the first time? Do we share any titles?

giphy

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

Project Hail Mary by Any Weir (on audio!)

If you’ve experienced Project Hail Mary you know! If you’ve read the print version, you might want to consider a reread via the audio format! Even though there’s a lot of science and math that I was tempted to skim, I was pleasantly surprised by the alien and the powerful friendship theme in this sci-fi page-turner. Amaze! Amaze! Amaze!


A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

A Place For Us by Farheen Fatima Mirza

I will never forget the emotional reading experience that this story provided. I loved the way this book ended with a passage from the father’s point of view! (One of my favorite endings ever.) I wasn’t expecting to hear from the father after a story focused on the women of the family, and it was a poignant and heartfelt reflection that had me in tears (IYKYK). I would adore the chance to read this favorite story (a lifetime favorite) again for the first time. (I wish the author had written a sequel!)


Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Yes, I adore quirky characters striving to live their best lives…..but this is not what this story is about, and the twist at the


Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

Castle of Water by Duane Hucklebridge

This is a well-written, fun, escapist read so I might want to read this page-turner again for the first time. Castaway meets Survivors.


The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean

Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

Guernsey is a delightful and charming read and one of the few books that I’ve actually reread. It checks all my boxes for a feel-good story. I enjoyed it the second time. However, I know I enjoyed my first read best and I’d rather have read it again for the first time than for a reread. (Not reviewed because I read it before I started blogging.) The film adaptation is excellent (and I’ve watched that twice, too!).


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12 Favorite Books: Happy #NationalBookLoversDay

August 9, 2021

National book Lovers Day: 12 Favorite Books (Image: blue text box and white text over a bunch of bright pink balloons)

Background Image Source: Canva

How are you celebrating National Book Lovers Day?

Are you grateful for books?

I think every day is Book Lover’s Day for me!

What would we do without our beloved books and reading?

I REALLY Loved These Twelve Books!

(which just scratch the surface of my lifetime favorites list!)

Happy National Book Lovers Day!

National Book Lover's Day, August 9 (image: a blue coffee mug sits on the spines of a line of books

What are you reading today?

I Love Reading

For National Book Lover’s Day I’m sharing twelve books I REALLY love, books that I could always reread, and books that are on my lifetime favorite’s list, and books that have received 5 star ratings. (in no special order):

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

I love epistolary format and slow burn romance and quaint small villages by the sea.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean


Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall

I love stories with themes of faith and friendship.

Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (cover) Image: white text over an orange leafless tree with sprawling branches set against a bright blue background


The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

I love well-written histfic with memorable characters inspired by real life heroes.

a woman dressed in a rose dress stands with her back to the camera overlooking a balcony and a gold wall


A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

I love a multi-generational family story…and the father/son part at the end is heartbreaking and poignant and memorable.

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)


The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

I love a well-told, page-turning histfic about real life events.

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

I love gently told histfic stories and books about books and slow burn romance.

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands near shelf lined books next to a window holding an open book


The Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

I love this beautifully told WW1 story of friendship and slow burn romance.

last christmas in paris


The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak

I love books that live in my memory years later….I also loved the unique narrator in this WW11 histfic.

eThe Book Thief by Markus Zusak (coer) Image: a sepia tone picture of a hand pushing over a line of dominoes


We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter

I love beautiful endings and this story with themes of music, faith, and family has a memorable and beautiful ending.

We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter (cover)

The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner

I love a mashup of genres and this story has a bit of everything I love: histfic (1906 San Francisco Earthquake), suspense/mystery, found family, women helping women, and a slow burn romance.

The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (cover) Image: blue-toned picture of a woman and young girl holding hands and walking down railroad tracks with backs to camerai


The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

I love this histfic story based on real life sisters with themes of friendship, women’s rights, and abolition of slavery.

The Intention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (cover) (white lettering over a goldish redish sky background) featuring a few small flying birds)


The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

I love this inspirational story promoting equal educational rights for girls around the world.

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)



Happy Reading Everyone!

QOTD:
How many of these titles have you read?
Do we share any favorites?
Are any of these titles on your favorites list?



I’m leaving you with a few of my favorite bookish images!

\image of a girl reading with one hand while pulling a wagon piled high with books

giphy

I’m always prepared with book recs! LOL

a young woman sitting on the kitchen floor leaning against a cabinet reading a book (I was going to lean the house, but then I realised...this book isn't going to read itself)

a drawing a young woman reading while sitting on a stack of books among many stacks of books (when I've had enough of reality, I just open a book)

 

6 Favorite Historical Fiction in 6 Months [2021] #6BooksIn6Months #ThrowBackThursday

July 1, 2021

6 in 6 [2021]

6 best histtorical fiction in 6 months (collage of covers)

The Six in Six is a meme created by Jo at The Book Jotter At the end of June, we are halfway through the year,  so the idea is to share the books we have read in these first 6 months. When I looked at my list of the top 6 so far this year, I realized that they were all Historical Fiction. You’re not really surprised, are you?!

I’m also linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #ThrowBackThursday (since I’ve previously reviewed 5 of the 6 titles).

In the true spirit of the 6 in 6 meme, we are asked to share 6 books in 6 categories. Coming up with 36 books will take more brain power than I have available right now, so I will share 6 of the best historical fiction books I’ve read so far this year.

Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links.

a cartoonish number 6

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[Reblog] Most Memorable Reads of 2020 #TopTenTuesday

December 29, 2020

2020 Memorable Reads:
The Top Ten List and The Categories

Most Memorable Reads of 2020 (Image: a colorful banner, confetti, and colorful baloons)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!”

I mostly love the angst of creating top ten lists! Although it can be a daunting task, it’s my most anticipated post of the year! First, let me remind you that this list is subjective. It’s compiled of books I’ve read this year (there are always so many more great ones that I didn’t get to), and each one has made it onto this list because reading it was a memorable, emotional experience and gave me a “book hangover.”

I’m presenting my list this year in two formats: in list form and in categories. The categories part is a bit more comprehensive because I provided some runners up. Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links. Although most titles in this post were published this year, a couple were not.

Thanks for sharing great reads with me this year!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Top Ten Memorable Fiction Reads of 2020

(see categories below for runners up and additional selections)

1

 The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare

2

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

3

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

4

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny

5

 The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton

6

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

7

 Sunflower Sisters by Martha Hall Kelly

8

 The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel

9

 The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

10

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Most Memorable Nonfiction

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9-11 by Garrett M. Graff

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah



* * * * * BONUS *****

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Most Memorable Reads of 2020 #TopTenTuesday

December 29, 2020

2020 Memorable Reads:
The Top Ten List and The Categories

Most Memorable Reads of 2020 (Image: a colorful banner, confetti, and colorful baloons)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!”

I mostly love the angst of creating top ten lists! Although it can be a daunting task, it’s my most anticipated post of the year! First, let me remind you that this list is subjective. It’s compiled of books I’ve read this year (there are always so many more great ones that I didn’t get to), and each one has made it onto this list because reading it was a memorable, emotional experience and gave me a “book hangover.”

I’m presenting my list this year in two formats: in list form and in categories. The categories part is a bit more comprehensive because I provided some runners up. Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links. Although most titles in this post were published this year, a couple were not.

Thanks for sharing great reads with me this year!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Top Ten Memorable Fiction Reads of 2020

(see categories below for runners up and additional selections)

1

 The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare

2

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

3

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

4

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny

5

 The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton

6

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

7

 Sunflower Sisters by Martha Hall Kelly

8

 The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel

9

 The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

10

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Most Memorable Nonfiction

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9-11 by Garrett M. Graff

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah



* * * * * BONUS *****

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The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry [Book Review] #throwbackthursday

November 19, 2020

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce
#throwbackthursday

the Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (cover) Image: purple and blue text on a light background with two small figures walking and a road in the distance

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Friendship, Life Reflection, Quirky Character

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m thrilled to share my review of the popular The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce…a reflection on life.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

In this well-loved story…

“Harold Fry is recently retired and lives in a small English village with his wife. After a long marriage, they have their differences but have settled into an amicable, predictable, and manageable daily routine. One day, a letter arrives for Harold from a woman (former co worker) that he hasn’t heard from in twenty years. Queenie is writing from a hospice to say goodbye. In the process of mailing his reply, Harold decides that he must deliver his message in person and decides to walk. As Harold impulsively sets out on his quest, he figures out the logistics of the six hundred mile journey as he goes. On the way he meets interesting people, finds plenty of time to reflect back on his life, and confronts some unsettling thoughts and feelings that he has buried.”

Shoe held together with duct tape

Continue here for my full review of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry ….



QOTD:

Have you read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry or is it on your TBR?

6 in 6 [2020]

July 11, 2020

6 in 6 [2020]

6 best in 6 months (image: a collage of 6 book covers)

The Six in Six is a meme created by Jo at The Book Jotter At the end of June (or in my case, mid-July!) we are halfway through the year,  so the idea is to share the books we have read in those first 6 months.

In the true spirit of the meme, we are asked to share 6 books in 6 categories. Because of the time factor, we can create a post with whatever combination works for us as long as it involves 6 books. Nicki @ The Secret Library Book Blog inspired me to participate in this meme.

For this 6 in 6 post, I will begin by listing the 6 best books I’ve read so far this year. Then I will add 6 additional categories but each category will have only one selection (not 6).

a cartoonish number 6

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National Poetry Month

April 13, 2020

National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month (image: top view of a cup of coffee and an open book of poetry on a wooden table....flowers peeking into the frame)

Image Source: Canva

Do you read poetry?

In recognition of National Poetry Month, I’m pleased to highlight fiction and nonfiction selections written in free verse. What I love about poetry is the figurative language, sparse words to convey the most beautiful reflections, and  exquisite and unique turns of phrases. I need to expand my reading experiences with poetry, and I would love to hear about your favorite poets and poetry collections in the comments, please!

Here are seven of my favorite MG and YA free verse titles:

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The Last Train to London: A Review

March 13, 2020

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton (cover)

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, WW11, Jewish, Nazi-Occupied Europe

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Summary:

Rescuing children, her life’s work…

The Last Train to London shares the story of real-life hero Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance who risked her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany. (She was honored as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem. )

The mission known as Kindertransport carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. In addition to hearing about Tante Truus as she was known, the author imagines the lives of children such as Stephan (budding playwright), his younger brother. and Zofie-Helene (mathematics protegee).

Auntie Truus (headshot)

Tante Truus: Image Source: Wikipedia

 

Auntie Truus statue in Amsterdam

Tante Truus statue in Amsterdam: Image Source: Wikipedia

My Thoughts:

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