The Beekeeper of Aleppo [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

December 2, 2021

The Beekeeper of Aleppo
#throwbackthursday

The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christy Lefteri (cover) Image: black text over a background of gold sketches of leaves, blossoms, and bees

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Family Life, Refugee Crisis, Syria

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a poignant refugee story, The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christy Lefteri.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“Nuri, a beekeeper, and his wife Afra, an artist, live happily with their son in beautiful Aleppo. They enjoy a quiet and peaceful life and value the friendship of close friends and extended family. Suddenly, their lives are turned upside down by war and, out of desperation, they make a decision to flee Syria. What Afra has experienced and seen causes her to go blind, complicating their journey through Turkey and Greece to get to Britain. On this risky and uncertain journey, they must learn to survive in unpredictable situations, to deal with their loss, to trust each other, to depend on the kindness and compassion of strangers, and to keep their hope alive.”

A compelling story of love, loss, hope, and compassion…

Continue here for my full review of The Beekeeper of Aleppo…



QOTD:

Have you read The Beekeeper of Aleppo or is it on your TBR?

 

November 2021 Reading Wrap Up

November 30, 2021

November 2021 Reading Wrap Up

November 2021 Reading Wrap Up (collage of covers)

How was your November reading?

Although November was a productive reading month for me, I had very few standout reads.
Out of 13 books completed, I had one 5-star read, five 4-star reads, six 3-star reads, one 2-star read, and one DNF (did not finish).
I’ve now read 110 books towards my year end goal of 100. Do you set a year-end goal?

My favorite fiction read of the month is The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom (for its unique premise and thoughtful content) and my favorite nonfiction is Dolly Parton, Songteller (because Dolly).


Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links or my linked reviews
.
ARC=Advanced Readers Copy (complimentary copy for review)


The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom (cover) text on a dark blue background...vignette of a rowboat on the water in front of a low sinking moon

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom

5 Stars. Contemporary fiction. What if God showed up when you called out for help? Review available 12/3/21.


Dolly Parton, Songteller Icover) by Dolly Parton (Image: a portrait of Dolly Parton in a round portrait frame)

Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton

4 Stars. Nonfiction. Memoir. I love Dolly! My review of Dolly Parton here.


The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton (black and white cover with red text) Image: a women in silhouette walks out of a building with her back to the camera and overlooks a view of the Eiffel Tower

The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton

4 Stars. (ARC) Historical Fiction. A brave American woman joins the Resistance Movement. My review of Postmistress of Paris here.


Escape From Mr. Lemoncello's Library by Chris Grabenstein (cover) Image: a graphic image of kids running along a yellow board game path

Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Gravenstein

4 Stars. Middle Grade Fiction. Fun and pageturning locked room adventure. Not reviewed.


A Single Rose by Muriel Barbery (cover) Image: a young man and woman sit on the porch of a Japanese house

A Single Rose by Muriel Barbery

4 Stars. Fiction Novella. (Novellas in November) Character driven and beautifully and quietly written. Thanks for the rec Davida! Not reviewed.


The Story of My Life (cover) by Helen Keller (image: a young girl sits with a book on her lap with one hand and holding a flower to smell with the other

The Story of My Life by Helen Keller

4 Stars. Memoir (novella). (Novellas in November) Interesting. Not reviewed.


A Vicarage Christmas by Kate Hewitt (cover) Image: a woman walks toward a row of houses in a winter scene

A Vicarage Christmas by Kate Hewitt

3.5 Stars Fiction Novella. (Novellas in November) Light women’s fiction. First in a series. Thanks for the rec Lisa! (I’ve also read the next in the series….see below!) Not reviewed. 


A Vicarage Reunion by Kate Hewitt (cover) Image: a man and woman and dog walk together in a lovely rural village

A Vicarage Reunion by Kate Hewitt

3.5 Stars. Light women’s fiction (second in a series but can be read as a stand alone). Not reviewed.


Christmas in Briarwood by MK McClintock (covere) Image: white text over a black and white background of snow covered pine trees

Christmas in Briarwood by MK McClintock

3.5 Stars. (#8 in a series but can be read as a stand alone) Light women’s fiction (Novellas in November)  with a substantial theme. Not reviewed.



A Winter's Wish For the Cornish Midwife  by Jo Bartlett (cover) Image:  a young woman walks in the snow next to a white picket fence decorated for Christmas

A Winter’s Wish For the Cornish Midwife by Jo Bartlett

3 Stars. Light women’s fiction. #3 in a series but can be read as a stand alone. (I forget who started me on this series….if it was YOU….leave a note in comments and I’ll link you!) Not reviewed.


The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros (cover) Image: yellow text on an orange background

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

3 Stars. Young Adult diverse read and own voices author. Novella (Novellas in November). Light on character and plot; abundant description of the neighborhood and people who make up the neighborhood. (content warning: rape with no details) Not reviewed.


Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton (cover) Image: a white house and a horse pulling a sleigh in a wintry snowy setting

Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

3 Stars. Fiction Novella. (Novellas in November) Beautifully written (5 stars) but the ending is tragic and depressing (which greatly affected my rating).


Going There by Katie Couric (cover) Image: white and gold text and a portrait of Katie seated in a white blouse and black pants

Going There by Katie Couric

2-2.5 Stars. Nonfiction. Memoir. Interesting in parts, but less inspirational than I was hoping. Skimmed a lot of it. Not reviewed.


The Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt (cover) Image: a boy sit at a school desk holding an open book and dropping pencils and an eraser

DNF: (54%) The Wednesday Wars by Gary D. Schmidt

2 Stars (for the 50% I read). I had high expectations for this popular Newbery Award Winner. The characters are not particularly likable and I kept feeling like the humor was written more for adults. I think many of the references might go over the heads of middle grade readers. Not reviewed.



QOTD:

What was your favorite November read?
Did we read any of the same books?
Which of these books is on your TBR?



ICYMI:

November Blog Posts:

The Postmistress of Paris Review
New Titles For My Nonfiction TBR
Novellas in November Wrap Up
Finding Chika Review
Dear Authors, An Update on These Characters Please!
Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction
My Newbery Project
The Stationary Shop Review
TTT: If You Like That, Read This
15 Favorite Memoir/Biography
Daughters of War Review
Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics Review
Ribbons of Scarlet Review
TTT: Ten Memorable Book Quotes (volume 2)
Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairings
The Day the World Came to Town Review
The Dutch House Review
Novellas in November 2021
Love and Lavender Review
My Year in Nonfiction 2021



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book covers are credited to Amazon.

© http://www.ReadingLadies.com

 

The Postmistress of Paris [Book Review]

November 30, 2021

The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton

The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton (cover) Image: a dark silhouette of a woman standing at a gate overlooking the Eiffel Tower

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Reisistance Movement, France, Art

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @HarperCollins @HarperBooks for a complimentary eARC of #ThePostMistressOfParis upon my request. All opinions are my own.

The Postmistress of Paris is the story of a young American heiress, Nanee (inspired by real life Mary Jayne Gold), who helps artists and intellectuals escape from Nazi-controlled Europe. Free-spirited Nanee lives in Paris when the war breaks out, but she soon relocates to Southern France and joins the Resistance Movement. Nanee works with American journalist Varian Fry and delivers information to those in hiding, helps to house the hunted, and occasionally participates in bringing them to safety.

My Thoughts:

(more…)

#NonficNov 2021: New Titles For My Nonfiction TBR #NonfictionBookParty

November 29, 2021

#NonficNov 2021: New Titles For My Nonfiction TBR

Background image source: Canva

I’m eager to participate in Nonfiction November this year hosted by What’s Nonfiction, Doing Dewey, The Thousand Book Project, Plucked from the Stacks, and OCBookgirl. During the month of November, you will notice one nonfiction focused post each week:

Weekly Topics:
(Join us?)

Week 1: (November 1-5) – My Year in Nonfiction (with Rennie at What’s Nonfiction)

Week 2: (November 8-12) – Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairing with Katie at Doing Dewey

Week 3: (November 15-19) – Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert (my fav memoirs/biographies) with Veronica at The Thousand Book Project

Week 4: (November 22-26) – Stranger Than Fiction (tweaked by me: Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction) with Christopher at Plucked from the Stacks.

Week 5: (November 29-December 3) — New to My NF TBR with Jaymi at OCBookgirl

Nonfiction November poster (text in white against a green background against colorful fall leaves)

Background image source: Canva

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Six New Nonfiction Titles For My TBR

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to reflect on the year, to celebrate and appreciate nonfiction, and to share recommendations.

I hope that you have enjoyed my focus on #NonFicNov and that you’ve found some new titles for your own TBR!

Today for Nonfiction November hosted by Jaymi at OCBookgirl, I have six nonfiction titles that I’m adding to my TBR! These are not all new releases…just new to my TBR. Because of FOMO and being a mood (impulsive) reader, I’ve already read three of the six (because they were available immediately at my library).

In Nonfiction November, have you added any nonfiction titles to your TBR?

***This post contains Amazon affilliate links.


B I O G R A P H Y

The Woman They Could Not Silence: One Woman, Her Incredible Fight For Freedom, and the Men Who Tried To Make Her Disappear by Kate Moore

Thanks to Shelleyrae at Book’d Out for the rec! I’m intrigued by this biography because of histfic books I’ve read with similar themes including Woman 99 and The Rose Code.

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore (book cover) Image: white text on black background with a yellowish rectangular image of a woman sliced into 8 narrow strips


I N T R O V E R T S

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Thanks to Kristin @ Kristin Kraves Books for reminding me (again!) that I have been wanting to read this one!

Quiet by Susan Cain (Cover: red lettering on a soft blue background)


M E M O I R

Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton

Thanks to Molly @ Silver Button Books for bringing this to my attention! I love Dolly Parton!
***I actually read this right away because it was immediately available at my library. (title is linked to my review)

Dolly Parton, Songteller Icover) by Dolly Parton (Image: a portrait of Dolly Parton in a round portrait frame)


S E L F – H E L P

How To Be Sad: Everything I’ve Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad by Helen Russell

Thanks to Nicki @ The Secret Library Book Blog for the rec!

How to be Sad by Helen Russell (yellow text over a puffy white cloud against a bright blue background)


H I S T O R I C A L  E V E N T

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim DeFede

Come From Away, the Musical

I’ve had The Day the World Came to Town on my TBR for a while (and I can’t recall the source of the recommendation), so I decided that the twentieth anniversary of 9/11 would be an appropriate and relevant time. The title is linked to my review. Through the process of publishing my review I came to realize (though blog and instagram comments) that there is also a Broadway musical, Come From Away, that I could access through AppleTV+ (title is a link). So, I accomplished both the nonfiction selection and the musical this November and highly recommend them!

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede (cover) Image: a family of four (2 adults and 2 children) stand with their back to the camera watching a jetliner land


M E M O I R

Going There by Katie Couric

I adore memoirs and Katie Couric kept me company every morning during the years I was a stay-at-home mom, so when I saw this on Jonetta’s TBR (@ The Blue Mood Cafe Blog I immediately requested it from the library. I read it as soon as it was available. I thought it was OK and there’s some interesting parts, but overall it turned out to be a meh read for me. Might be a case of high expectations.

Going There by Katie Couric (cover) Image: gold text and a picture of the author on the cover



QOTD

What have you read for Nonfiction November?

Have you added any nonfiction to your TBR?



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW. ReadingLadies.Com

 

Novellas in November 2021 Wrap Up #NovNov

November 26, 2021

Novellas in November 2021 Wrap Up #NovNov

Novellas in November (white text on a brownish orange textbox against a background of fall leaves)

Background image source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links

As well as #NonfictionNovember, I participated in Novellas in November (#NovNov) this year with Cathy @ 746 Books and Rebecca @ Bookish Beck. Here are the results of my novella reading.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Novellas I Read:

 Contemporary Fiction

Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson
3 Stars
(beautifully and lyrically written but I found the second person pov challenging)

Short Nonfiction 

The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
3 Stars
(beautiful passages about nature and fascinating descriptions of her childhood and college years)

Literature in Translation (from French)

A Single Rose by Muriel Barbery
4 Stars
(beautifully and quietly written….wonderful descriptions of Japanese gardens, neighborhoods, and culture)

Short Classic

Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
3 Stars
(masterfully written but I had a difficult time with the ending…..it seemed contrived and it was difficult to buy into the actions by the characters….a very sad story)

Own Voices/YA

 The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
3 Stars
(I didn’t feel well connected to the main character because the story is more focused on describing her neighbors and her neighborhood than on character development….insightful and poignant descriptions of experiences and poverty in a Hispanic neighborhood)

Christmas/Romance (closed door)/Chick Lit
(mood reading!)

A Vicarage Christmas by Kate Hewitt
3.5 Stars
(light and enjoyable contemporary fiction)

Christmas in Briarwood by MK McClintock
3.5 Stars
(light and heartfelt historical fiction)


Other novellas I’ve enjoyed in recent years include:

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman (novella in translation)

The Deal of a Lifetime by Fredrik Backman (although this might be considered a short story)

The Redhead by the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler

The Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata (novella in translation from Japanese)

Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff



QOTD:

Did you read a novella in November?
If you could recommend ONE novella title for me, what would you recommend?
If you participated in #NovNov, please leave a link to your post in comments.



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

Finding Chika: A Little Girl, An Earthquake, and the Making of a Family [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday #NonficNov

November 18, 2021

Finding Chika: A Little Girl, An Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom
#throwbackthursday

Finding Chika Review

Genre/Categories/Setting: Nonfiction, Memoir, Haiti, Foster Guardianship, Found Family, Inspiration

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a poignant found family memoir, Finding Chika by Mitch Albom.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“In Finding Chika: A Little Girl, An Earthquake, and the Making of a Family, Mitch Albom, well-known author of Tuesdays With Morrie, shares his life-changing experience of caring for Chika, a young Haitian orphan. She was born a few days before the devastating 2010 earthquake into a poverty-stricken family. When her mother died after giving birth to her baby brother, Dad found placements for all their children. Chika was brought to the Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Mitch Albom operates in Port Au Prince. After five-year-old Chika was diagnosed with a medical condition that was untreatable in Haiti, the Alboms brought Chika to America to live with them while seeking medical intervention. Instead of returning to Haiti as planned, Chika and the Alboms become found family, and Mitch learns a great deal about caring for a special needs child, the definition of family, unconditional love, loss, and grief.”

“Families are like pieces of art. You can make them from almost anything. The only ingredient you need to make a family is unconditional love.”

“What we carry defines who we are. And the effort we make is our legacy.” ~Mitch Albom

Continue here for my full review of Finding Chika



QOTD:

Have you read Finding Chika or is it on your TBR?

 

Dear Authors, An Update on These Characters Please! #TopTenTuesday

November 23, 2021

Dear Authors, I'd Like a Character Update (Image: white text over a background of hands on a laptop keyboard)

Image Source: Canva

***Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: “Ten Characters I’d Love an Update on.”

Dear Authors,
I’d Like an Update on These Characters Please!

Do you appreciate epilogues that fill readers in on the future years after the story concludes? Most of the time, I do! I’m never ready to let go of a beloved character and I enjoy hearing what the author envisions for their futures! Sometimes, the story ends and the author leaves the reader to imagine their futures. Other times, a reader like myself simply wants an entire new book as a followup!


Adunni from The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

I would like an entire followup book please! I saw on Instagram that Abi Daré has already said that she has no plans for a followup. Minds are changeable….amirite!

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)


Ryland and Rocky from Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Admit it! I’m not the only one who wonders about Ryland’s future (no spoilers!)

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object


Eleanor from Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

I love brave Eleanor and we were left with hope, but I want to know if something more develops between Eleanor and Raymund and how she handles the following years (after the big reveal…no spoilers!).

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)


Eleanor and Park from Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

OK. I know you want to know, too. What were those three words? Do Eleanor and Park have a future?


Ada from The War That Saved My Life and The War I Finally Won by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

I wish with all my readerly heart that we had a follow up to these two wonderful Middle Grade books and spunky Ada! Maybe a Young Adult followup? Please?!


Juliet and Dawsey from The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

I know this is an impossible ask because the author has died. But aren’t you curious to follow the lives of all these eccentric characters?

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean


Tina and Anders from Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson

The ending was open ended and a bit unsatisfactory for me as a result. After investing hours in reading this beautiful story, I MUST know…did Tina meet Anders at the museum?!


Rafiq (father) and Amar (son) from A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Oh, the last part of this story between father and son was so emotional, tender, and heartfelt! I must know how this relationship unfolds in the future!

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)


Ha from Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

Ha represents many favorite immigrant characters from multiple middle grade reads in that I want to know about their adult lives. Ha’s story ended somewhat abruptly and left me wanting more. The conclusions to these stories are always hopeful, but how do their lives unfold as adults?

Inside Out & Back Again y Thannha Lai (cover) ....a girl holding onto a tree trunk with one hand on a breezy day


Johanna and the Captain from News of the World by Paulette Jiles

I loved the redemptive and poignant ending, and even though the author included a lovely epilogue, I’d love a followup book on how that found family relationship unfolded over the years.

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky



QOTD!

There are so many more I could add!
How about you? For which character would you most eagerly want an update?
Do you commiserate with any of my desires here?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© http://www.ReadingLadies.com

Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction #NonficNov #NonfictionNovember

November 22, 2021

Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction #NonficNov

Nonfiction November poster (text in white against a green background against colorful fall leaves)

I’m eager to participate in Nonfiction November this year hosted by What’s Nonfiction, Doing Dewey, The Thousand Book Project, Plucked from the Stacks, and OCBookgirl. During the month of November, you will notice one nonfiction focused post each week:

Weekly Topics:
(Join us?)

Week 1: (November 1-5) – My Year in Nonfiction (with Rennie at What’s Nonfiction)

Week 2: (November 8-12) – Fiction/Nonfiction Book Pairing with Katie at Doing Dewey

Week 3: (November 15-19) – Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert (my fav memoirs/biographies) with Veronica at The Thousand Book Project

Week 4: (November 22-26) – Stranger Than Fiction (tweaked by me: Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction) with Christopher at Plucked from the Stacks.

Week 5: (November 29-December 3) — New to My NF TBR with Jaymi at OCBookgirl

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to reflect on the year, to celebrate and appreciate nonfiction, and to share recommendations.

This week’s prompt for Nonfiction November hostecome fd by Christopher at Plucked from the Stacks is Stranger Than Fiction. I am tweaking this topic because, for me, a favorite form of nonfiction is narrative nonfiction (nonfiction that reads like a story). There is nothing strange about these stories! However, you will notice that several have been turned into movies….because….well….they read like fiction!

Please join me for Nonfiction November!

Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction (image: white text over the top view of several hardback books)

Background Image Source: Canva

Nonfiction That Reads Like Fiction


The Girl With Seven Names: Escape From North Korea by Hyeonseo Lee

(My review of Girl With Seven Names here)

The Girl With Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee (cover)

Born a Crime: Stories of a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

(My review of Born a Crime here)

A young readers version of Born a Crime here.

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (cover) Image: a casual Trevor Noah

Educated by Tara Westover

(My review of Educated here)

Educated by Tara Westover (cover) Image: a giant sharpened pencil as background

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

The Glass Castle movie.

(My review of Glass Castle here)

Glass Castle

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

(My review of Killers of the Flower Moon here)

Movie in the making.

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann (cover) White text over a reddish and dark background

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance

(My review of Hillbilly Elegy here)

Hillbilly Elegy Netflix movie here.

Hillbilly Elegy (cover)

The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls

(My review of Glass Castle here)

Glass Castle movie here.

The Glass Castle (cover)

Unbroken: A WW11 Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

Unbroken movie and YA version here.

(Not reviewed because I read this before I started blogging or Goodreads)

Unbroken

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas

The Bonhoeffer movie.

(Not reviewed because I read this before blogging or using Goodreads)

Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas (cover)

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim DeFede

See the Broadway production, Come From Away or watch it currently streaming on AppleTV+.

(My review of The Day the World Came to Town)

The Day the World Came to Town



QOTD:

See any favorites?

Have you read one of these titles?

I’d love to hear your suggestion for a nonfiction book that is stranger than fiction or for a nonfiction book that reads like fiction.



Happy Reading Book Friends!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

My Newbery Project #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge #NewberyBooks

November 19, 2021

Today for the #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge I’m focusing on Middle Grade reads, particularly books that have won the Newbery Award. In fact, I have a Newbery Page in my blog menu!

My Newbery Project

my-newbery-project

Background Image Source: Canva

What is the Newbery Award?

First awarded in 1922, the Newbery Award also known as the John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association of Library Services for Children (as part of the American Library Association) to one author (per year) for the most distinguished contribution to American children’s literature.

Winners display the medal on the cover as shown on this 2019 winner:

Merci Suarez Changes Gears by Meg Medina (cover) ....girl on bike

For each year, in addition to the one Newbery winner there are also Honor winners.

You can find the complete list of Winners and Honors in this link.

When I’m in a reading slump or simply looking for a lighter and quicker read, I often turn to middle grade literature as evidenced in these posts: 10 Reasons Why I love Middle Grade Books. or 10 Awesome and Diverse Reads for Middle Grade or 10 Inspirational Reads For Middle grade. Obviously, the Newbery list is not the only resource for finding fabulous middle-grade reads, but I do check the list to see what I can check off. As a result, I’ve decided to document my progress toward reading Newbery Award winners.

I’ve created a page that you can find in my blog menu or by clicking on this link:

My Page For My Newbery Project Progress Here

How Many Newbery Award Winner (or Honors) Have You Read?

Or do you have other awards you follow?

 I’m linking up with Deb @ Deb’s World and SueDonna, and Jo for the November installment of #WhatsOnYourBookShelfChallenge .

Whats On Your Bookshelf Challenge



Remain Young At Heart and Read Middle Grade!

QOTD:

Do you have a favorite Middle Grade Read? A favorite Newbery Award winner?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

The Stationery Shop [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

November 18, 2021

The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali 
#throwbackthursday

The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali (cover) Image: white text over a background of colorful pink and orange flowers)

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Romantic Fiction, Romance, Family Life, Iran

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a bittersweet love story, The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“In 1953, two teenagers meet in Mr. Fakhri’s Stationery Shop in Tehran. Roya loves the fountain pens, shiny ink bottles, and the thick, lovely writing paper while Bahman loves Rumi’s poetry and is an activist. They share a love of poetry and continue to meet in the Stationery Shop while their romance grows. Their happy life together is complicated by family tension and political unrest.”

Complicated families…..soul mates…..resilience…..

Continue here for my full review of The Stationery Shop…



QOTD:

Have you read The Stationery Shop or is it on your TBR?