A Hundred Crickets Singing [Book Review]

April 27, 2022

A Hundred Crickets Singing by Cathy Gohlke

A Hundred Crickets Singing by Cathy Gohlke (cover) Image: a young woman shown from the waist up stands with her back to the camera and hands behind her back

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Christian Historical Fiction, Slavery, Racism/Prejudice, Faith, Appalachia (rural North Carolina), WW11 and Civil War

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @TyndaleHouse for a complimentary copy of #AHundredCricketsSinging upon my request. All opinions are my own.

In split timelines (1861 and 1944) and through two wars (Civil War and WW11) we hear the stories of two young women who lived on the same plantation and same house in No Creek, North Carolina (Appalachia) as they face the hardships of war and encounter unrelenting racism and prejudice. It’s through Celia’s discovery of a hidden journal in 1944 that we hear Minnie’s story from the Civil War days and cheer for Celia as she attempts to right a wrong.

My Thoughts:

(more…)

Code Name Helene [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

March 17, 2022

Code Name Hélène by Ariel Lawhon
#throwbackthursday

Code Name Helene by Ariel Lawhom (coveer)

Genre/Categories/Setting: Biographical Historical Fiction, World War 11, French Resistance Movement, France

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing suspenseful, page-turning historical fiction, Code Name Hélène by Ariel Lawhon.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Told in multiple timelines, Code Name Hélène is the thrilling and intense story of real-life socialite spy, Nancy Wake. Helene is only one of her four code names. When Nancy Wake first meets the love of her life, wealthy Henri Fiocca, in 1936, she is a freelance reporter and an Australian ex-pat living in Paris. As the Germans invade France, she begins her spy career by using her socialite status to smuggle documents and people across borders. Eventually, she is forced to escape France and leave Henri behind. At this time she is trained for Special Operations by the British and returns to France to work in the French Resistance Movement. Known for her innovative thinking and leadership, profanity, and red lipstick, she secures weapons from the allied forces for the French Resistance fighters. This is complicated because she is also a hunted woman with a bounty on her head.”

Real-life socialite spy, Nancy Wake….

Nancy Wake in 1945

Image Source: Wikipedia

Fast-paced, suspenseful, and gritty historical fiction…

Continue here for my full review of Code Name Hélène..



QOTD:

Have you read Code Name Hélène or is it on your TBR?

 

Sisters of Night and Fog [Book Review] #WomensHistoryMonth

March 1, 2022

Sisters of Night and Fog by Erika Robuck

The Sisters of Night and Fog by Erika Robuck (cover) Image: white text over a picture of two women walking away from the camera through a foggy night

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, WW11, Europe, Biographical, Espionage, Resistance

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @BerkleyPub for a complimentary eARC of #TheSistersOfNightAndFog upon my request. All opinions are my own.

An American socialite in France meets a British secret agent…..

Sisters of Night and Fog is the story of two real life, brave young women who join the Resistance Movement during WW11. Virginia d’Albert-Lake is married and lives in France, and adventure-seeking, nineteen-year-old Violette Szabo is a French citizen but lives in England. Because Violette is an expert with firearms and has dual citizenship, she is recruited by Britain’s secretive Special Operations organization. The two women eventually meet at Ravensbruck concentration camp.

Virginia and Violette

My Thoughts:

(more…)

The Last Train to London [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 24, 2022

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton
#throwbackthursday

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton (cover)

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, WW11, Jewish, Nazi-Occupied Europe

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing one of my favorite inspirational historical fiction reads, The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Rescuing children, her life’s work…

The Last Train to London shares the story of real-life hero Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance who risked her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. (She was honored as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem. )

The mission known as Kindertransport carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. In addition to hearing about Tante Truus as she was known, the author imagines the lives of children such as Stephan (budding playwright), his younger brother. and Zofie-Helene (mathematics protegee).

Auntie Truus (headshot)Tante Truus: Image Source: Wikipedia

Courage isn’t the absence of fear, rather the going forward in the face of it…

Continue here for my full review of The Last Train to London…



QOTD:

Have you read The Last Train to London or is it on your TBR?

 

The Winemaker’s Wife [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

January 27,  2022

The Winemaker’s Wife by Kristin Harmel
#throwbackthursday

The Winemaker's Wife by Kristin Harmel (cover)

 

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction/Women’s Fiction, WW11, Wine Making, French Resistance Movement, France

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a pageturning story, The Winemaker’s Wife by Kristin Harmel.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“Told from multiple perspectives and in a past and present timeline, The Winemaker’s Wife is a story of secrets, survival, guilt, and love.

Through the perspectives of Inès and Céline, we experience the intrigue of their daily lives before and during the German invasion of France during WW11; we learn details of the champagne production at the (fictional) Maison Chauveau in northern France near the city of Reims; and we also hear a little about the French resistance (hiding munitions and Jews). An alternate present-day timeline shares the story of Liv who is mysteriously whisked away from her home in New York to France by her eccentric grandmother. There are secrets from the past to be revealed.”

…secrets, survival, guilt, and love…

Continue here for my full review of The Winemaker’s Wife…



QOTD:

Have you read The Winemaker’s Wife or is it on your TBR?

 

The Postmistress of Paris [Book Review]

November 30, 2021

The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton

The Postmistress of Paris by Meg Waite Clayton (cover) Image: a dark silhouette of a woman standing at a gate overlooking the Eiffel Tower

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Reisistance Movement, France, Art

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @HarperCollins @HarperBooks for a complimentary eARC of #ThePostMistressOfParis upon my request. All opinions are my own.

The Postmistress of Paris is the story of a young American heiress, Nanee (inspired by real life Mary Jayne Gold), who helps artists and intellectuals escape from Nazi-controlled Europe. Free-spirited Nanee lives in Paris when the war breaks out, but she soon relocates to Southern France and joins the Resistance Movement. Nanee works with American journalist Varian Fry and delivers information to those in hiding, helps to house the hunted, and occasionally participates in bringing them to safety.

My Thoughts:

(more…)

Daughters of War [Book Review]

November 15, 2021

Daughters of War by Dinah Jefferies

Daughters of War by Dinah Jiefferies (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress stands in a field of wild flowers

Genre/Categories/Setting: WW11 Historical Fiction, France, Sisters, Family Drama

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley #HarperCollins @HarperCollins360 @Harper360  for a complimentary eARC of #DaughtersOfWar upon my request. All opinions are my own.

In 1944, three sisters live together in an old cottage as they wait out the war. Their father died and their mother is living in England. The oldest, Helene, works as a nurse for a local doctor and takes responsibility for her younger sisters. The middle sister, Elise, operates a small cafe in the village and is committed to working with the Reisistance despite the danger. The youngest sister, Florence, prepares the meals, works in the garden, and is artistic. As the war comes to their doorstep, the sisters take more risks as they fight to survive in their own ways.

My Thoughts:

(more…)

The Things We Cannot Say [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

October 14, 2021

The Things We Cannot Say by Kelly Rimmer
#throwbackthursday

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Poland, WW11, Love Story, Family Life

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a heartfelt and poignant story, The Things We Cannot Say by Kelly Rimmer.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“From the age of nine, Alina has been in love with her best friend Tomasz. At fifteen and engaged to Tomasz, Alina and her neighbors discount the rumors of Nazi soldiers at the Polish border, and she spends her time dreaming of her wedding. Tomasz is in college in Warsaw when the Nazis occupy Poland. While Alina and Tomasz briefly lose touch, Alina and her family’s efforts are focused on survival. In the present-day timeline, Alina is in a convalescent home in the U. S. recovering from a stroke and convincing her granddaughter that she must make a trip to Poland in her place and visit certain sites. The granddaughter, Alice, is leading a stressful life with two special needs children and an unsatisfactory marriage, but she feels compelled to honor her grandmother’s request. In dual timelines, Alice visits her grandmother, makes plans to visit Poland, and actually makes the trip, while the WW11 timeline involving Alina and Tomasz progresses. Readers find out what eventually happens to Alina and Tomasz as Alice meets the Polish family and unravels Alina’s most closely guarded secrets.”

Engaging…memorable…page-turning…and emotional!

Continue here for my full review of The Things We Cannot Say…



QOTD:

Have you read The Things We Cannot Say or is it on your TBR?

The Medallion [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

September 23, 2021

The Medallion by Cathy Gohlke
#throwbackthursday

The Medallion Review

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, WW11, Jewish, Christian, Warsaw

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a compelling and page-turning story of WW11, The Medallion by Cathy Gohlke.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“1939 Warsaw is the setting for this harrowing, heartfelt, and inspirational WW11 tale of survival, courage, loss, hope, risk, and faith. Sophie works in the city library, and her husband, Janek, is deployed with the Polish Air Force. When the Germans invade Warsaw in 1939 and streets become a dangerous war zone, Sophie feels compelled to help friends and strangers. Rosa and Itzhak are pregnant with their first child when they seek shelter in the Jewish ghetto. When Itzhak leaves her to check on the safety of his family, Rosa faces the horrific possibility of sending their small child into hiding to save her life, but first Rosa cuts a medallion (the Jewish Tree of Life) in half and places half around her young daughter’s neck. She prays that this will be enough to reunite them after the war.

We follow the lives of these two memorable couples whose worlds are torn apart and, in post-war years, connected by a shared love for a young daughter.”

“When all seems lost, God can make a way forward.”

Continue here for my full review of The Medallion…



QOTD:

Have you read The Medalliion or is it on your TBR?

 

The Huntress [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

August 12, 2021

The Huntress by Kate Quinn
#throwbackthursday

The Huntress by Kate Quinn (cover) Image: a shadowy black and white picture of a woman dressed in dark clothing walking away from the camera into an opening

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction (post WW11), mystery, suspense, thriller, romance

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a suspenseful and page-turning historical fiction story, The Huntress by Kate Quinn

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“An ex WW11 war correspondent, a former American soldier, and an extraordinary Russian woman pilot team up to hunt down a Nazi war criminal known as The Huntress. The duel timeline fills in the past and follows the present-day intrigue. The two timelines merge in a thrilling and suspenseful conclusion.”

Historical fiction with a generous serving of mystery, intrigue, suspense, and romance!

Continue here for my full review of The Huntress…..



QOTD:

Have you read The Huntress or is it on your TBR?