10 Memorable Bookish Characters #TopTenTuesday #BooksAboutBooks

May 10, 2022

10 Memorable Bookish Characters

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Memorable Bookish Characters (white text in a coral text box over a background of wild poppies)

I’m linking up today with #TopTenTuesday: That Artsy Reader Girl: Bookish Characters.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Memorable characters make books memorable!

I LOVE wonderful, memorable characters! And I especially love the opportunity to talk about bookish characters and share them! Books about books and books, bookshop and library settings, and bookish characters are my favorite subgenre.

If you are looking for a wonderful summer read, consider one of these titles!

In no particular order, here are 10 of my most memorable bookish characters…I love each one!

(Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links.)

Cussy from The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

Cussy is a pack-horse librarian in the mountains and hills of Kentucky and a determined, compassionate literacy advocate and difference-maker.

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)


Mukesh from The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams

Mukesh discovers the joys of reading and makes an unexpected friend.

The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams (cover) white text overe a graphic image of scattered open books


Grace from The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

Grace falls in love with reading and meets the love of her life in a dusty old bookshop during WW11.

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands near shelf lined books next to a window holding an open book


Madeleine from The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

Madeleine finds a fresh beginning and new friends as the new owner of her beloved aunt’s bookshop.

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay (cover)


Emilia from How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry

Emilia returns to her seaside home to save her late father’s beloved bookshop.

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry (cover)


Dita from The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

Real-life Dita Kraus is a daring and feisty teenager who bravely risks her life to bring literacy to the children of Auschwitz.

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)


Fikry from The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Quirky and opinionated, Fikry is changed forever by an abandoned baby and a sales representative. 

 The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (cover)


 Juliet and Dawsey from The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

Juliet and Dawsey and the book club members become found family. (epistolary)

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean


Helene and Frank from 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

This is actually a memoir revealing a true bookish (long-distance) friendship. (epistolary)

84, Charing Cross Road by Jelene Hanff (cover) Image: sepia toned picture of a London bookstore


Evie from The Jane Austen Society

A quiet young woman, Evie plays a crucial role in the preservation of Austen’s work and is a member of the first Jane Austen book club.

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner (cover) Image: five people (backs to camera) walk with arms linked


There are sooooo many more, but these are the first 10 that came to mind. If bookish characters could recommend books, they would certainly highly recommend each of these!



QOTD:

Who is one of your most memorable bookish characters?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature #TopTenTuesday

February 22, 2022

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature

Top Ten Tuesday 10 Favorite Dynamic Duos

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Dynamic Duos in Literature.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Who are your favorite Dynamic Duos?

Too many! Amirite?!

This is a FUN prompt! The following dynamic duos were the first to pop into my mind because if I overthink it, I’ll end up with a list of a hundred. See any favorites?

Who is your favorite dynamic duo?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

The Captain & Johanna
News of the World by Paulette Jiles
(the movie)

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky

…fighting with dimes! IYKYK

2

Ryland & Rocky
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…saving planets! IYKYK!

3

Jack & Wynn
The River by Peter Heller

 

The River by Peter Heller (cover) Image: white text over a background of red and dark blue swirly lines

survival!

4

Eudora & Rose
The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

…multigenerational friendship

5

Eleanor & Raymond
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…friendship at its finest

6

Eliza and Alexander Hamilton
My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

…true partners!

7

Nostagic:
Charlotte & Wilbur
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
(the movie)

 

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White (cover) Image: a graphic image of a young girl, a pig, and a spider

…childhood favorite!

8

Sophie & Barry
Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

…castaways!

9

Hazel & Duncan
Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

…overcoming obstacles, building trust, and facing challenges

10

A Dynamic Trio: Osla, Mab, and Beth
The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

 

a woman dressed in a rose dress stands with her back to the camera overlooking a balcony and a gold wall

…a dynamic TRIO of brave and smart women!



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these?
What’s one of your favorite dynamic duos?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

Are You a Rereader? What Makes You Reread A Book? #EleanorOliphantIsCompletelyFine [Book Review] #LetsTalkBookish #LetsDiscuss2022

February 2, 2022

Are you a rereader?

What makes you reread a book?

Are You a Rereader? Rereading Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine (white text over a background of a stack of hardback books)

 

Image Source: Canva

Some avid readers are rereaders and some are not. Which are you?

How do you decide what to reread? What makes you want to reread? Are you a frequent rereader or an occassional rereader? Maybe you’ve never reread a book and can tell us why.

I’m reviewing Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine (a reread) in today’s blog post.

I was going to clean the house, but then I realised.l..this book isn't going to read itself (Image: a young woman sits on the floor leaning against a cabinet reading a book)

I love discussion posts, and many of my favorite bloggers participate in Let’s Talk Bookish and the Discussion Challenge. Do you love discussion posts?

As I answer the questions, think about how you would answer them for yourself. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

This post is inspired by the Let’s Talk Bookish topic hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books and Dani @ Literary Lion. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge (this is also my sign up post), hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Am I a Rereader?

Not really. I seldom reread. So many books, so little time! The few books I have reread are on my lifetime favorites list. I can’t envision rereading a book I didn’t absolutely love. Are you a rereader?

What Motivates Me to Reread?

Upon reading the last page of a book I really really loved, I put it on my lifetime favorites list. These are the books that I choose from if I’m going to reread.

I realize that rereading can have a different purpose from the first read. Maybe in a reread I can pay closer attention to the author’s writing and style; maybe I’m looking for clues that I missed or evidence for why the author chose a certain ending; maybe I’m looking for evidence for a conclusion I drew from the author’s open ending; maybe its to revisit certain themes or beloved characters; or maybe the book was just so beautiful that I want to immerse myself in that world again. I’m a fairly fast reader, so rereading helps me focus on other elements (besides a pageturning plot).

What motivated me to reread the book I’m reviewing today?

  • I LOVED it!
  • The jaw dropping ending had me immediately contemplating a reread some day so that I could appreciate the way the author constructed the story and developed the characters.
  • A few members of my online book club chose to read this book in January and I thought it would be fun to reread and discuss it with others.
  • I read it before blogging and have never written a formal review (which you’ll receive today!).

My Biggest Drawbacks in Rereading:

  1. Because I only reread books from my lifetime favorites list, I’m always afraid that I won’t love it as much as the first time.
  2. So many books, so little time.
  3. I suffer from FOMO and I’m distracted by the new and shiny, so the pleasure of rereading gets pushed to the back burner.

Can you relate to any of my drawbacks?

What Books Have I Reread?

See? It’s not many! There are so many books and so little time that I seldom feel I have the time to invest in a reread. The reason I reread the last three MG books is that I’m in a MG book club and I wanted to reread the selections before I made the recommendations. How many books have you reread?

What Books Would I Like to Reread Next?

  1. A Place For Us
  2. Anxious People
  3. The Hiding Place

Do you have a reread planned?

Today’s Review and My Recent Reread:
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

My Summary:

Eleanor has a carefully constructed life and daily routine, avoids close relationships, and says exactly what she thinks. Her weekends involve frozen pizza and vodka. Every Wednesday she talks with Mummy. The day she meets easy going and big-hearted Raymond, the IT guy, things begin to change as she opens her heart to friendship.

My Thoughts:

(I think this is a story best read without reading reviews first, so proceed with caution as I might reveal more than you want to know.)

Common Misconception: I frequently hear Eleanor Oliphant described as humorous and quirky. My opinion differs. Yes, Eleanor is outspoken and her observations and comments are candid and at times snarky. Many times, her behaviors and observations brought a smile to my face. However, there’s obviously so much more going on that I wouldn’t describe it as humorous or quirky. I think of it more as a story of trauma and survival.

The Hero: Raymond is the hero in the story. He’s kind, nonjudgemental, accepting, encouraging, consistent, persistent, understanding, thoughtful, and patient. A true friend. A “foil” to all the unkind people at work. I hope that you have a Raymond in your life and you are a Raymond to others. #ChooseKindness

I LOVE brave Eleanor. I admire Eleanor and her ability to carve out the life she does in spite of her past trauma which is alluded to throughout the story. She is a survivor. I love that Raymond is her friend (and I hope much more!).

“I felt the heat where his hand had been; it was only a moment, but it left a warm imprint, almost as though it might be visible. A human hand was exactly the right weight, exactly the right temperature for touching another person, I realized. I’d shaken hands a fair bit over the year–more so recently–but I hadn’t been touched in a lifetime.”

Guaranteed UNFORGETTABLE. This is a difficulty story to review because it’s best “to discover for yourself.” After I read the last page, I KNEW that this story would demand a reread. I was engaged as much on the reread as I was the first time even though I knew the big reveal. The way Gail Honeyman constructs the story and develops the character is masterful!

Compelling Themes: loneliness, bravery, honesty, survival, unconditional love, healing, acceptance, friendship, and restoration.

***contains spoilers***
Content Considerations: past spousal abuse and domestic violence, past childhood neglect and violence, suicide attempt, alcholism, workplace harassment (bullying)

Highly Recommended: I realize that this might not be a book for everyone, but Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is on my lifetime favorites list and I highly encourage you to give this unique story a try. Recommended for readers who appreciate complex personalities and complicated lives. I’ve heard Eleanor Oliphant compared to other “quirky” reads and characters, but for me she is in a category all her own and can not be compared. Have you read it?

My Star Rating: 5 Stars

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

Eleanor Oliphant Information Here.

Meet the Author, Gail Honeyman

Gail HoneymanGail was born and raised in Stirling, Scotland. Her mother was as a civil servant and her father a scientist. Gail was an avid reader in her childhood, visiting the library “a ridiculous number of times a week” due to her passion for books.

She studied French language and literature at the Glasgow University and continued her education at the University of Oxford, starting a postgraduate course in French poetry. However, Gail realised that an academic career was not for her and she started a string of “backroom jobs”. She worked at first as a civil servant in economic development and then as an administrator at Glasgow University.

While working at Glasgow University, Gail enrolled in a Faber Academy writing course, writing the first three chapters of what would become Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. Cambridge’s Lucy Cavendish College was running a competition for unpublished fiction by female writers and it was just what she was looking for to fulfill her lifelong passion for reading, so she submitted her work and the rest is history. The novel was published in 2017 and earned numerous awards, sold millions of copies, and received wide critical acclaim.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine won the 2017 Costa First Novel Award.

 



QOTD:

What makes you reread or not reread? What is the last book you reread?

Have you read Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine?

If you are a rereader, what has been your favorite reread?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

10 Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title #TopTenTuesday

February 1, 2022

Ten Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title

TTT Ten Favorite Books With Character Names in the Title

 

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books With Character Names in the Title

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

“I LOVE these characters!”

I don’t normally post twice in one day but I couldn’t help joining today’s Top Ten Tuesday prompt because I can’t miss an opportunity to share memorable characters (8 adult titles and 2 middle grade titles) with you! Do you see any favorites?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links. Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews.

(in no particular order)

1

Eudora from The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

2

Eleanor from Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

3

Ove from A Man Called Ove

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a man with a cat brushing against his legs stands in an open field with his back to the camera

4

Britt-Marie from Britt-Marie Was Here

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a woman stands on a sidewalk with her back to the camera, a valise and soccer ball at her feet

5

Frankie from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom (cover) Image: black and white drawing of two young kids sitting in a tree (one playing a guitar)

6

Harold from The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

The Unlikely Pilgrimmage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (cover)

7

Fikry from The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (cover)

8

Shergill sisters from The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters

9

Amal from Amal Unbound (MG)

Amal Unbound by Aisha Saeed (cover).... two hands palms facing readers that are brightly decorated wtih drawings

10

Isaiah from Isaiah Dunn is my Hero (MG)

Isaiah Dunn Is My Hero by Kelly Baptist (cover) Image: the back view of a middle grade boy wearing a blue superhero cape and holding a pencil

 



QOTD:

Can think think of a title you love that names a character?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text

 



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

Dear Authors, An Update on These Characters Please! #TopTenTuesday

November 23, 2021

Dear Authors, I'd Like a Character Update (Image: white text over a background of hands on a laptop keyboard)

Image Source: Canva

***Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: “Ten Characters I’d Love an Update on.”

Dear Authors,
I’d Like an Update on These Characters Please!

Do you appreciate epilogues that fill readers in on the future years after the story concludes? Most of the time, I do! I’m never ready to let go of a beloved character and I enjoy hearing what the author envisions for their futures! Sometimes, the story ends and the author leaves the reader to imagine their futures. Other times, a reader like myself simply wants an entire new book as a followup!


Adunni from The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

I would like an entire followup book please! I saw on Instagram that Abi Daré has already said that she has no plans for a followup. Minds are changeable….amirite!

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)


Ryland and Rocky from Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Admit it! I’m not the only one who wonders about Ryland’s future (no spoilers!)

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object


Eleanor from Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

I love brave Eleanor and we were left with hope, but I want to know if something more develops between Eleanor and Raymund and how she handles the following years (after the big reveal…no spoilers!).

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)


Eleanor and Park from Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

OK. I know you want to know, too. What were those three words? Do Eleanor and Park have a future?


Ada from The War That Saved My Life and The War I Finally Won by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

I wish with all my readerly heart that we had a follow up to these two wonderful Middle Grade books and spunky Ada! Maybe a Young Adult followup? Please?!


Juliet and Dawsey from The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

I know this is an impossible ask because the author has died. But aren’t you curious to follow the lives of all these eccentric characters?

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean


Tina and Anders from Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson

The ending was open ended and a bit unsatisfactory for me as a result. After investing hours in reading this beautiful story, I MUST know…did Tina meet Anders at the museum?!


Rafiq (father) and Amar (son) from A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

Oh, the last part of this story between father and son was so emotional, tender, and heartfelt! I must know how this relationship unfolds in the future!

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)


Ha from Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

Ha represents many favorite immigrant characters from multiple middle grade reads in that I want to know about their adult lives. Ha’s story ended somewhat abruptly and left me wanting more. The conclusions to these stories are always hopeful, but how do their lives unfold as adults?

Inside Out & Back Again y Thannha Lai (cover) ....a girl holding onto a tree trunk with one hand on a breezy day


Johanna and the Captain from News of the World by Paulette Jiles

I loved the redemptive and poignant ending, and even though the author included a lovely epilogue, I’d love a followup book on how that found family relationship unfolded over the years.

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky



QOTD!

There are so many more I could add!
How about you? For which character would you most eagerly want an update?
Do you commiserate with any of my desires here?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© http://www.ReadingLadies.com

The Map of Salt and Stars [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

December 31, 2020

The Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar
#throwbackthursday

The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar (cover)

Genre/Categories: Fiction, Mythology, Folk Tale, Magical Realism, Coming of Age, Syrian, Story Within a Story

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m eager to share my review of the compelling The Map of Salt and Stars.a page-turning story with two inspirational female protagonists.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

The Map of Salt and Stars is really two stories. One story is contemporary and the other is a mythological folk tale that takes place 800 years earlier. In the contemporary story, Nour’s mother, a Syrian-American, a cartographer and painter of beautiful maps, decides to move Nour and her sisters from New York City back to Syria after the death of Nour’s father. The mother feels a strong desire to live closer to her family. After they arrive in Syria, they experience effects of the civil war evidenced by protests and shelling in their quiet neighborhood. When a shell destroys Nour’s home and neighborhood, she and her family and a close family friend of her father’s are forced to flee as refugees across seven countries of the Middle East and North Africa in search of safety.

The story within the story is a favorite folk tale that Nour’s father told her over and over again as a young girl. Nour loves the main character in the folk tale, Rawiya, who becomes an apprentice to al-Idrisi, commissioned by King Roger II of Sicily to create a map of the region. Rawiya follows al-Idrisi on a journey across the Middle East and the north of Africa where they encounter a mythical beast and fight epic battles.

There are strong connections between the two stories as Nour and her family are forced from their home to travel the identical route that Rawiya traveled eight hundred years earlier. Throughout the journey, Nour remembers and is inspired by the heroine of her favorite folktale as she faces similar challenges and fears.

“I am a woman and a warrior,” Rawiya said, her blade cutting into his club.
If you think I can’t be both, you’ve been lied to.

Continue here for my full review of The Map of Salt and Stars ….



QOTD:

Have you read The Map of Salt and Stars or is it on your TBR?

The Girl With the Louding Voice [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

December 24, 2020

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré
#throwbackthursday

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare (cover)

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Women’s Fiction, Nigeria, Oppression, Women’s Rights, Education

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m eager to share my review of the compelling The  Girl With the Louding Voice…a message of hope and encouragement to girls worldwide who are dreaming and striving to use their own Louding Voices.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“Life for a woman is not easy in Nigeria. Adunni’s mom plants the thought of having a “voice” in her spirit. Fourteen-year-old Adunni is determined to fight for her voice to be heard and for her future despite being sold as a third wife. Even when she runs away, she finds herself in another powerless position of servitude. Adunni is introduced to a more modern woman who befriends her and encourages her to keep hope alive and to think of herself as important and having value.

“Tomorrow will be better than today. I have value and I’m important.”

Continue here for my full review of The Girl With the Louding Voice ….



QOTD:

Have you read Girl With the Louding Voice or is it on your TBR?

The Librarian of Auschwitz [Book Review] #throwbackthursday

October 22, 2020

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

#throwbackthursday

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe (cover) Image: a young girl stands on top of a giant stack of books

Genre/Categories: YA Historical Fiction, Fictionalized Biography, Jewish, WW11, Holocaust

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m sharing my review of The Librarian of Auschwitz, brave…inspirational…courageous…feisty…determined….daring…

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary of The Librarian of Auschwitz

“During the darkest hours of the Holocaust in an Auschwitz concentration camp, a young girl, Dita Kraus, risks her life to keep the magic of books alive. Imprisoned along with her mother and father, Dita finds meaning and purpose as the Librarian of a secret library within a secret school in the “family camp” section of Auschwitz, caring for eight precious volumes that have been smuggled in past the guards.

Be sure to read the author’s Afterward as he speaks of his interview with the real Dita Kraus about her incredible life, courage, and survival.”

 Continue here for my review of The Librarian of Auschwitz

QOTD: Have you read The Librarian of Auschwitz or is it on your TBR?

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry [Book Review] #flashbackfriday #fridayfavorite

August 14, 2020

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (cover) Image: right shot of a bookstore's painted red door and window display

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Love Story, Found Family, Family Life

Welcome to Friday Favorite! Today in lieu of reviewing a new release, I  am choosing to revisit an old favorite which I read years before starting this blog. (thanks for the inspiration Sandy’s Book a Day blog!)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Summary:

A.J. Fikry lives on a fictional island (Alice Island) off the coast of Massachusetts. The isolated island reflects Fikry’s own mental state as he lives with consuming grief over the loss of his wife to a tragic accident. He’s lonely, drinks to excess, is grumpy and opinionated, and struggles with low book sales in the bookstore that he and his wife bought when they moved to the island. Complicating this already dire situation, Fikry’s most prized and valuable book is stolen, he is rude to a book publisher’s representative, and a baby is abandoned in his bookshop. How will Fikry pull his life together?

My Thoughts:

(more…)

The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah and Educated by Tara Westover [Book Reviews] #throwbackthursday

August 6, 2020

Compelling Characters in The Great Alone (fiction) by Kristin Hannah and Educated (nonfiction) by Tara Westover
#throwbackthursday

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for
#throwbackthursday.

This year as part of Blog Audit Challenge 2020 I’m going back to update older review posts. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads, and today I’m sharing my reviews of The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah and Educated by Tara Westover, a focus on compelling characters…

a collage of Educated and The Great Alone covers

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Two compelling characters…

Introduction:

Today I’m highlighting two compelling characters: Leni from The Great Alone (fiction) and Tara from Educated: A Memoir (nonfiction). Leni and Tara share some similar struggles and challenges. The two stories reminded me at times of The Glass Castle (charismatic yet unpredictable fathers, unstable homes, neglect, poverty) and Hillbilly Elegy (chaotic family life, nurturing grandparents)….a fascinating book club discussion could be centered around discussing the connections between these books and characters.

Continue here for my review of the Great Alone and Educated

QOTD: Have you read The Great Alone or Educated or are they on your TBR?