[Reblog] Most Memorable Reads of 2020 #TopTenTuesday

December 29, 2020

2020 Memorable Reads:
The Top Ten List and The Categories

Most Memorable Reads of 2020 (Image: a colorful banner, confetti, and colorful baloons)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!”

I mostly love the angst of creating top ten lists! Although it can be a daunting task, it’s my most anticipated post of the year! First, let me remind you that this list is subjective. It’s compiled of books I’ve read this year (there are always so many more great ones that I didn’t get to), and each one has made it onto this list because reading it was a memorable, emotional experience and gave me a “book hangover.”

I’m presenting my list this year in two formats: in list form and in categories. The categories part is a bit more comprehensive because I provided some runners up. Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links. Although most titles in this post were published this year, a couple were not.

Thanks for sharing great reads with me this year!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Top Ten Memorable Fiction Reads of 2020

(see categories below for runners up and additional selections)

1

 The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare

2

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

3

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

4

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny

5

 The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton

6

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

7

 Sunflower Sisters by Martha Hall Kelly

8

 The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel

9

 The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

10

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Most Memorable Nonfiction

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9-11 by Garrett M. Graff

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah



* * * * * BONUS *****

(more…)

#6Degrees of Separation: From Hamnet to The Aviator’s Wife

January 2, 2021

#6Degrees of Separation: From Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell to The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin

#6Degrees of Separation: From Hamnet to The Aviator's Wife (image of book covers talked about in post)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Women Behind Famous Men!

#6Degrees of Separation: from Hamnet to The Aviator’s Wife.

#6Degrees is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. I’ve seen this meme around for a while and Davida’s posts at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog inspired me to give it a try this year! Making connections between books is challenging, creative, and fun!

Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. A book doesn’t need to be connected to all the other books on the list, only to the one next to it in the chain. The rules are:

  • Link the books together in any way you like.
  • Provide a link in your post to the meme at Books Are My Favourite and Best.
  • Share these rules in your post.
  • Paste the link to your post in the comments on Kate’s post and/or the Linky Tool on that post.
  • Invite your blog readers to join in and paste their links in the comments and/or the Linky Tool.
  • Share your post on Twitter using the #6Degrees hashtag.
  • Be nice! Visit and comment on other posts and/or retweet other #6Degrees posts.

Play Along?

Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell (cover) Image: head shot of a young boy wearing a felt hat and a large feather lies horizontally across his eyesThis month’s prompt starts with Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell, and I’m thrilled because it was a favorite, top read for me in 2020.

An important aspect of the story is the woman and the family behind a famous man, so my chain is held together with this idea. Also, all of these books are written by women authors!

My Summary: “Hamnet is set in 1580s Warwickshire, England, and it is the highly imagined story of William Shakespeare’s family, especially his son, Hamnet, and his wife, Agnes (Anne). It’s the story of a marriage and family. Shakespeare and Agnes had three children. It’s also a story of grief as we know from history that Hamnet dies. O’Farrell imagines that he might have died as a result of the 1550s plague. William Shakespeare is “off-stage” for the majority of the story and is never mentioned by name (referred to as husband, father, etc.). This centers Agnes (and the children) as the main character of the story and grief as the main theme. Agnes is a beautiful woman who has some supernatural gifts of healing with herbs, is entirely devoted to family, and frequently experiences glimpses into the future.My review of Hamnet here.

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)First Degree. From Hamnet, I continue the central idea of the woman and family behind a famous man with My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie, in which the story focuses on Eliza Hamilton.

My Summary: “A general’s daughter, Elizabeth Schuyler meets and marries Alexander Hamilton amid the union’s fight for independence and the uncertainties of war. Eliza and Alexander find themselves establishing their life together at the same time as they are at the center of our nation’s founding. Authors Dray and Kamoie used thousands of letters and original sources to imagine Eliza’s story as a patriot, loving wife, political partner, loyal friend, supportive sister, and devoted mother of eight.” My review of My Dear Hamilton here.

America's First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)Second Degree: Another story by the same authors is America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie. This story focuses on the daughter behind the famous man.

My Summary: “A fast-paced read, this well-researched novel draws from thousands of letters and original sources as it tells the story of Thomas Jefferson’s eldest daughter, Martha “Patsy” Jefferson Randolph. Patsy shares her father’s devotion to their country and becomes his partner, protector, and loyal companion after the death of her mother. As a young girl, she travels with him to Paris when he becomes the American minister to France, and it is here she eventually learns of his relationship with Sally Hemings, a slave girl about her own age. According to the authors, it’s during these Paris years that Patsy falls in love with William Short, her father’s assistant and protégé who is an abolitionist and aspiring diplomat. Patsy is torn between love, principles, and family loyalty, and she questions whether she can be married to William and remain devoted to her father. This is a story of sacrifice and grit as Patsy tirelessly protects her father’s reputation and supports him as he guides and leads the nation he helped found. My review of America’s First Daughter here.

Jefferson's Sons by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (cover)Third Degree: The next book to involve the family of a famous man is Jefferson’s Sons: A Founding Father’s Secret Sons (Middle Grade) by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley. This is a Middle-Grade read that is enjoyable for adults, too.

Goodreads Summary: Beverly, Harriet, Madison, and Eston are Thomas Jefferson’s children by one of his slaves, Sally Hemings, and while they do get special treatment – better work, better shoes, even violin lessons – they are still slaves, and are never to mention who their father is. The lighter-skinned children have been promised a chance to escape into white society, but what does this mean for the children who look more like their mother? As each child grows up, their questions about slavery and freedom become tougher, calling into question the real meaning of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

Told in three parts from the points of view of three of Jefferson’s slaves – Beverly, Madison, and a third boy close to the Hemings family – these engaging and poignant voices shed light on what life was like as one of Jefferson’s invisible offspring.

(more…)

Most Memorable Reads of 2020 #TopTenTuesday

December 29, 2020

2020 Memorable Reads:
The Top Ten List and The Categories

Most Memorable Reads of 2020 (Image: a colorful banner, confetti, and colorful baloons)

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year!”

I mostly love the angst of creating top ten lists! Although it can be a daunting task, it’s my most anticipated post of the year! First, let me remind you that this list is subjective. It’s compiled of books I’ve read this year (there are always so many more great ones that I didn’t get to), and each one has made it onto this list because reading it was a memorable, emotional experience and gave me a “book hangover.”

I’m presenting my list this year in two formats: in list form and in categories. The categories part is a bit more comprehensive because I provided some runners up. Titles are links to my reviews or Amazon affiliate links. Although most titles in this post were published this year, a couple were not.

Thanks for sharing great reads with me this year!

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Top Ten Memorable Fiction Reads of 2020

(see categories below for runners up and additional selections)

1

 The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Dare

2

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

3

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

4

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny

5

 The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton

6

The Printed Letter Bookshop by Katherine Reay

7

 Sunflower Sisters by Martha Hall Kelly

8

 The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel

9

 The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

10

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Most Memorable Nonfiction

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9-11 by Garrett M. Graff

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah



* * * * * BONUS *****

(more…)

December 2020 Reading Wrap Up

December 28, 2020

December 2020 Reading Wrap Up

December 2020 Reading Wrap Up (collage of book covers)

How was your December reading?

December was a twelve book reading month, but it weighed in heavily on the “meh” side with only one five-star read, four four-star reads, six three-star reads, and one two-star read. Find all my December reads listed below in order of Star Rating. Keep in mind that I normally recommend five- and four-star reads on the blog; three-star reads receive mixed reviews from me for various reasons; and two-star reads are books that were not for me. One-star reads are usually shelved as DNF.

My favorite read of the month is The Girl From the Channel Islands by Jenny Lecoat (histfic).

Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my available reviews are linked
.


The Girl From the Channel Islands by Jenny Lecoat (cover) Image: a young woman stands next to a bicycle in a field overlooking a small village as airplanes fly overhead

The Girl From the Channel Islands (ARC) by Jenny Lecoat

5 Stars. (ARC). Compelling and memorable WW11 histfic.
Pub Date: 2/2/2021 Review coming soon.


The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (cover) Image: blue-toned picture of a woman and young girl holding hands and walking down railroad tracks with backs to camerai

The Nature of Fragile Things (ARC) by Susan Meissner

4.5 Stars. (ARC.)  Histfic (San Francisco Earthquake)/Suspense/Mystery/Family Drama mashup. Pub Date: 2/2/2021. Review coming soon.


The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles (cover) Image: a woman sits on a wall with her back to the camera overlooking the Eiffel Tower in the distance

The Paris Library (ARC) by Janet Skeslien Charles

4 Stars (ARC). WW11 histfic featuring the American Library of Paris. A book about books. Pub Date: 2/9/2021. Review coming soon.


the Chanel Sisters by Judithe Little (cover) Image: a tight shot of a woman's downcast face wear red lipstick, a white beaded bracelet and white feather trimmed hat....the Eiffel Tower in the background

The Chanel Sisters (ARC) by Judithe Little

4 Stars (ARC). Interesting imagined story of Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel from her sister’s perspective. Pub Date: 12/29/2020. Review coming soon.


(more…)

Winter 2020 TBR #TopTenTuesday

December 15, 2020

Winter Reading Season TBR (2020-2021) #TopTenTuesday

Winter TBR 2020/2021 (image: a small flocked tree with a burlap wrapped pot sits on a white hardback book

Image Source: Esther Hanten on Unsplash

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

As usual, most of the titles on my TBR are a result of the wonderful recommendations I receive from fellow bloggers or new books by favorite authors!

I never plan more than ten titles for my quarterly TBR lists because I need to leave time for mood reading and review commitments. These ten books are a priority on a much longer general TBR.

What is your most anticipated read this winter?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Winter To Read List.

Top Ten Tuesday (winter) graphic


Winter 2020-2021 TBR


The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (Pub Date: February 2, 2021)

The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (cover) Image: blue-toned picture of a woman and young girl holding hands and walking down railroad tracks with backs to camerai

 A new book from favorite author, Susan Meissner. I’m still waiting to see if I might receive an ARC.

(more…)

Gift Ideas: Everyone Gets a Book! #TopTenTuesday

December 8, 2020

Give a Book as a Holiday Gift!

10 Categories

Book Ideas for Gift Giving (Christmas coffee cup and Christmas tree and lights image)

Background Image Source: Canva; Center Image Source:  Andreea Radu on Unsplash 

TTT That Arsy Reader Girl ChristmasI’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for a December Freebie. I decided to dedicate my Top Ten Tuesday Freebie to books you might give as GIFTS! And….ahem.. even though there are TEN categories, there are a few more than ten gift ideas! (You’ve been warned!)

pulling a shelf of library books

“When someone asks me for a book recommendation!”

My favorite gift to buy is a book! How about you?

As you plan your holiday gift giving, you might be looking for book recommendations. Check out my TEN categories and a few of my FAVORITE suggestions (and Bonus picks) below!

Some of these are fairly new releases while others are a few years older. All titles are Amazon affiliate links. Many of these books have been reviewed on the blog and my available reviews are linked.

Books Men Might Enjoy

(I’ve also read most of these!)

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9-11 by Garrett M. Graff (nonfiction, first person accounts of 9-11). My review of Only Plane here.

Bonus Picks:

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents (nonfiction) by Isabel Wilkerson (and her previous book, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration…narrative nonfiction).

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (NF, memoir). My review of Born a Crime here.

The River by Peter Heller (wilderness survival, thriller) My review of The River here.

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown.  (narrative nonfiction)

(all by Ron Chernow) Grant; Washington: A Life; or Alexander Hamilton; or Grant (narrative nonfiction biographies) My husband highly recommends these.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (social justice.) My review of Just Mercy here.

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (histfic, western, movie in theaters December, 2020) My brief review of News of the World in this post.

Beartown by Fredrik Backman (sports, hockey, intense issues, competition, community, family) My brief review of Beartown in this post.


 Women Might Enjoy (heavier fiction)

(my husband has enjoyed a few of these!)

The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré (Nigeria, education, racism). My review of Girl here.

Hamnet by Maggie O-Farrel (histfic, Shakespheare). My review of Hamnet here.

Bonus Picks:

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasai (complicated family drama, mental health, adiction). My review of Transcendent Kingdom here.

The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali (diversity, Iran, histfic) My review. of Stationery Shop

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (family dynamics, *on my lifetime favs list*) My review of Place For Us.

The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (marriage and family, *on my lifetime favs list*) My review of Dearly Beloved.

If You Want to Make God Laugh by Bianca Marais (histfic, diversity, South African post Apartheid, sibling relationships, found family). My review of Make God Laugh here.

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens (contemporary fiction, against the odds, *trigger: child abandonment) My review of Crawdads here.

The Dream Daughter by Diane Chamberlain (science fiction, time travel, *trigger: high risk birth, adoption) My review of Dream Daughter here.

The Secret Daughter by Shilpi Somaya Gowda (adoption) My review of Secret Daughter here.


Women’s Lighter Fiction

The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (character driven, older characters) My review of Eudora Honeysett here.

Bonus Picks:

The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg. (older characters, found family) My review of Arthur Truluv here.

The Switch by Beth O’Leary. (fun women’s fiction) My review of The Switch here.

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry ( beach read, romance, chick lit) My review of Find Love here.

(more…)

#6Degrees of Separation: From Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret to The War That Saved My Life

December 5, 2020

#6Degrees of Separation: From Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume to The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

#6Degrees of Separation (collage of book covers)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Moving in Middle Grade!

#6Degrees of Separation: from Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret to The War That Saved My Life.

#6Degrees is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. I’ve seen this meme around for a while and Davida’s posts at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog inspired me to give it a try this year! Making connections between books is challenging, creative, and fun!

Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. A book doesn’t need to be connected to all the other books on the list, only to the one next to it in the chain. The rules are:

  • Link the books together in any way you like.
  • Provide a link in your post to the meme at Books Are My Favourite and Best.
  • Share these rules in your post.
  • Paste the link to your post in the comments on Kate’s post and/or the Linky Tool on that post.
  • Invite your blog readers to join in and paste their links in the comments and/or the Linky Tool.
  • Share your post on Twitter using the #6Degrees hash tag.
  • Be nice! Visit and comment on other posts and/or retweet other #6Degrees posts.

Play Along?

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by July Blume (cover) Image: a close up of a girls open palms holding a red heartThis month’s prompt starts with Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, and it is a Middle-Grade book I read a long, long time ago. I decided to reread for this post. For me, the reread doesn’t hold up. It’s dated, and I don’t think I would recommend it for young readers today (but that’s probably a post for another time).

One theme in the story is moving to a new home, so my chain is held together with a theme of moving.

Goodreads Summary: “Margaret Simon, almost twelve, likes long hair, tuna fish, the smell of rain, and things that are pink. She’s just moved from New York City to Farbook, New Jersey, and she is anxious to fit in with her new friends. When Nancy, Gretchen, and Jamie form a secret club to talk about private subjects like boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret is happy to belong. But none of them can believe Margaret doesn’t have religion and that she isn’t going to the Y or the Jewish Community Center. What they don’t know is Margaret has her own very special relationship with God. She can talk to God about everything–family, friends, even Moose Freed, her secret crush. Margaret is funny and real, and her thoughts and feelings are oh-so-relatable–you’ll feel like she’s talking right to you, sharing her secrets with a friend.

Inside Out & Back Again y Thannha Lai (cover) ....a girl holding onto a tree trunk with one hand on a breezy dayFirst Degree. From the summary of Are You There God?, I notice a theme of moving. This reminds me of another Middle-Grade book, Inside Out and Back Again by Thannha Lai, in which the main character moves from Vietnam to America.

My Summary: “Told in free verse from the perspective of ten-year-old Ha and inspired by the author’s own experiences, this is a poignant and beautifully written story of a family’s escape from Vietnam before the fall of Saigon and move to America. This refugee and immigrant story can build feelings of compassion and lead to thoughtful reflection as Ha experiences grief, bullying, learning English, new foods and customs, kindness from a neighbor, finding her voice, family loyalty, and the comfort of old traditions. A perfect read for older elementary or middle-grade readers but, as with all good literature, enjoyable for adults too…a diverse read that builds understanding and empathy. ***I love this story!

Lemons by Melissa Savage (cover) Image: yellow title on a blue background; drawings of a boy (holding binoculars to his eyes) and a girl (holding two lemons up to her eyes)Second Degree: Another Middle-Grade story involving moving is Lemons by Melissa Savage. Moving in this story is due to the loss of a mother.

My Summary: “Ten-year-old Lemonade Liberty Witt believes her mom about making lemonade when life gets difficult. However, Lemon faces circumstances that test her lemonade-making abilities. After the death of her mother, she is sent to live in another town with a grandfather she’s never met. Her life gets better when she makes a new friend, Tobin Sky, who is CEO of Bigfoot Detectives, Inc. Yes, there have been suspected Bigfoot sightings in this wooded Northern California community! Lemon becomes Tobin’s assistant, but they discover something more important than Bigfoot. My review of Lemons here.

Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan (cover) Image: a young hispanic girl dances in the fieldsThird Degree: The next Middle-Grade book to involve moving is Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan. Esperanza and her family flee Mexico and move to the Central Valley of California.

Goodreads Summary: Esperanza thought she’d always live with her family on their ranch in Mexico–she’d always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home, and servants. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California during the Great Depression and settle in a camp for Mexican farmworkers. Esperanza isn’t ready for the hard labor, financial struggles, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When their new life is threatened, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances–Mama’s life, and her own, depend on it.’

(more…)

November 2020 Reading Wrap Up

November 30, 2020

November 2020 Reading Wrap Up

November 2020 Reading Wrap Up (Image: a collage of book titles)

How was your November reading?

November was a nine book reading month. I am happy to report two five-star reads, four four-star reads, two three-star reads, and one two-star read. Find all my November reads listed below in order of Star Rating. Keep in mind that I normally recommend five- and four-star reads on the blog; three-star reads receive mixed reviews from me for various reasons; and two-star reads are books that were not for me. One star reads are usually shelved as DNF.

My favorite read of the month is an unputdownable Memoir: The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger (Holocaust survivor).

My favorite fiction title is The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin.

Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my available reviews are linked
.


The Choice by Dr. Edith Eva Eger (cover) Image: black text on a white background and a black stemmed reddish flower is placed on the entire left margin

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

5 Stars. A compelling, inspirational, and heartfelt memoir.
My review of The Choice here.


The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands looking at a book with her back to a wall of bookshelves

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

5 Stars. (ARC) Memorable WW11 histfic (London). Pub Date: 4/6/2021. Review coming soon.


a woman and a cat sit on a pink wooden bench surrounded by flowers, birds, and the countryside

New Arrivals at Hedgehog Hollow by Jessica Redland

4 Stars (ARC). Light women’s fiction and #2 in the Hedgehog Hollow series. Pub Date: 1/7/2021. My review coming soon.


Tomorrow Will Be Better by Betty Smith (cover) Image: a row of New York style apartments

Tomorrow Will Be Better by Betty Smith

4 Stars (ARC). A republished classic by the author of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. My review of Tomorrow will Be Better coming soon.


(more…)

Thankful For Family Themes in Literature #toptentuesday

November 24, 2020

Thankful For Family Themes in Literature

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Thanksgiving Freebie.

TTT 10 Books With Family Themes (Image: a father and mother sit on the ground and hold their small daughter on their shoulders)

Image Source: Canva

Families

This year during the Pandemic, most of us have appreciated our families more than ever. We’ve missed visiting them; we’ve missed family celebrations and milestones; we’ve been isolated at home with them; we’ve probably participated in or observed “drive by” parties; and some have lost loved ones during this year.

For this week’s TTT Thanksgiving prompt, my thoughts turn to how thankful I am for family…birth families…found families…blended families…adopted families…extended family…challenging or complicated families…all the families. This post is a collection of stories that focus on family and all its complexities.

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.



10 Books With Family Themes



We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter

(Throughout this WW11 historical fiction novel, the family is an important underlying theme; I especially love the poignant ending in this story!)
My 5 star review of We Were the Lucky Ones here.

we were the lucky ones


A Place For Us by Fatima Faheen Mirza

(A complicated, multi-generational family drama…on my lifetime favs list)
My 5+ star review of A Place For Us here.

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)


All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penney

(Family themes run deep in this latest installment of the Inspector Gamache series)
My 5 star review of All the Devils Are Here here.

All the Devils Are Here by Louise Penny (cover) Image: text over a background of a darkened Eiffel Tower against a swirly painted sky


The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai

(Family loyalty in this heart-wrenching, histfic Vietnamese story is compelling)
My review of The Mountains Sing here.

The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai (cover) Image: white text over a mountaineous background


Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love by Dani Shapiro

(A DNA discovery complicates relationships in this close family)
My review of Inheritance here.

Inheritance by Dani Shapiro (cover) Image: white text over a baby's christening dress


Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo (YA)

(A complicated and poignant story of discovered family)
My review of Clap when You Land here.

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo (cover)


Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

(The compelling story of a family troubled by addiction and mental illness)
My 5 star review of Transcendent Kingdom here.

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi (cover) Image: gold text on light pink (top half) and black (bottom half) background


The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg

(A heartfelt story of found family)
My review of The Story of Arthur Truluv here.

The Story of Authur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg (cover) Image: a man holds a yellow umbrella over a young woman


More to the Story by Hena Khan (MG)

(A modern retelling of Little Women from a Pakistani-American perspective…perfect mother/daughter read aloud with your middle-grade reader)
My Goodreads review of More to the Story here.

More to the Story by Hena Khan (cover) four girls lying on their backs forming a circle on the floor with their heads nearly touching


The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street (MG)

(A lighthearted, fun, and heartfelt family story….perfect for a read aloud with middle grade readers)

Vanderbeekers



….and so many more!

QOTD!

Do you love a book with family themes?

Do you have a rec to add to this list?



ICYMI:

My Year in NonFiction #nonficnov 2020

Fiction and Nonfiction Book Pairings #nonficnov 2020

Play the Expert: Memoirs and Biographies #nonficnov 2020

Adding Nonfiction Titles To My TBR #nonficnov 2020



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***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

The book covers are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

Book Titles and Songs #toptentuesday

November 10, 2020

Book Titles and Songs

top ten tuesday

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Tuesday: Book and Song Titles.

TTT: Book Titles and Songs (Image: a tall stack of books on a blue painted wooden table)

Do you like music?

I’m spinning this week’s TTT prompt a bit to highlight six books that have music as a theme, one title that reminds me of a song, and three book titles that would make great song titles.

*Titles are Amazon affiliate links.



6 Books With Music Themes



The Music Shop by Rachel Joyce

Frank is dedicated to preserving vinyl and owns a music shop in a run-down London neighborhood. His special gift is recommending just the right record or song for each customer. There’s a playlist, too!  My full review of The Music Shop here.

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto by Mitch Albom

As we follow Frankie through his life, we also hear about many music legends. Yes, there’s a playlist! My full review of Frankie Presto here.

The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir by Jennifer Ryan

As the men are called to action in WW11, the ladies of Chilbury resurrect the choir. My full review of Chilbury Ladies’ Choir here.

Musical Chairs byAmy Poeppel

Women’s fiction, complicated family drama, and a string trio. My Goodreads review of Musical Chairs here.

The Ensemble by Aja Gabel

A string quartet and four friendships. My review of The Ensemble in this post.

She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh

How Dolly’s songs tie to Feminism and how they resonated with women of a certain generation and socioeconomic status. My review of She Come By It Natural here.

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