10 Books Set Near Water #TopTenTuesday

April 6, 2021

10 Books Set Near Water #TopTenTuesday

Books Set Near Water (white text over a background of a father walking with his young daughter in the surf)

Image Source: Canva

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

What is the last book you read set near water?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’d Gladly Throw Into the Ocean. I had decided to skip this week’s topic, but then when I was reading other blogs today, I was inspired by What Cathy Read Next to SPIN it!

My reason for spinning the topic is 1) I don’t enjoy revisiting/promoting books that I haven’t enjoyed 2) I wouldn’t throw a book in the ocean or any water no matter how much I disliked it 3) What I dislike you might love and 4) I fear hurting an author’s feelings by calling her/him out on a dislike list.

So, ALL of these books set near water I enthusiastically recommend!

 *This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


Castle of Water by Duane Hucklebridge

Castaways meets Romance.

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)


Sea Wife by Amity Gaige

Living off the grid.

Sea Wife by Amity Gaige (cover) Image: a quiet lagoon


Gift From the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Reflections on sea shells and life.

Gift From the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh (cover) black text over a blue and pink background (a seashell above the title)


The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter by Hazel Gaynor

Historical Fiction.

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March 2021 Reading Wrap Up

March 31, 2021

March 2021 Reading Wrap Up

March 2021 Reading Wrap Up (collage of book covers)

How was your March reading?

March was a great fourteen-book reading month. Because I read several Middle-Grade books for Middle-Grade March, I’m dividing my list between adult and middle grade.

My favorite fiction read of the month is Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman closely followed by The Women of Chateau Lafayette by Stephanie Dray, and my favorite nonfiction was Open by Andre Agassi. My favorite middle-grade read was Ghost by Jason Reynolds.


Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my available reviews are linked
.
ARC=Advanced Readers Copy


Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman (cover) Image: two girls sit on a wing of a plane

Radar Girls (ARC) by Sara Ackerman

5  Stars (ARC). Page-turning and unputdownable WW11 historical fiction.
Pub Date: 7/27/21 Review coming July 27, 2021.


The Women of Chateau Lafayette by Stephanie Dray (cover) Image: a woman kneels down in an archway to speak with a young girl

The Women of Chateau Lafayette by Stephanie Dray

4.5 Stars (rounded to 5). (ARC) Compelling Historical Fiction (French Revolution, WW1, and WW11). My review of Women of Chateau Lafayette here.


Open by Andre Agassi (cover) Image: a head shot of Andre Agassi

Open by Andre Agassi

4.5 Stars (rounded to 5). Nonfiction, Memoir, Sports. My review of Open here.


The Windsor Knot by S.J. Bennett (cover) gold text on a royal blue background

The Windsor Knot by S.J. Bennett

4 Stars  Light-reading Cozy Mystery featuring Queen Elizabeth. My review of Windsor Knot here.


Hana Kyan Carries On by Uzma Jalaluddin (cover) Image: black text over an outline of a girl with a microphone on a bright blue background

Hana Kahn Carries On by Uzma Jalaluddin

4 Stars. (ARC) Light-reading Contemporary Fiction, Rom-Com. Muslim. Inspired by You’ve Got Mail.
Pub Date: 3/13/2021. Review coming April 13, 2021.


Love at First by Kate Clayborn (cover) Image: white text on purple background....a drawing of buildings at the bottom margin and white stars sprinkled over the purple background

Love at First by Kate Clayborn

3.5-4 Stars. Light-reading Contemporary Fiction. Women’s Fiction. Romance. Not reviewed.
Pub Date: 5/4/21 Review: 5/3/21


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Women’s History Month [Book Tag]

March 29, 2021

Women’s History Month Book Tag

Six young women standing on a bluff with itheir hands on the shoulders of the girl in front of her ... all facing sideways looking at the ocean

Image Source: Canva

Thanks Lisa @ Hopewell’s Public Library of Life Blog for the inspiration for today’s book tag!

Rules:

  • Thank the person who tagged you and link back to their post. Thanks for the inspiration Hopewell’s Public Library of Life!
  • Link to the creator’s blog in your post Thank you, Margaret at Weird Zeal!
  • Answer the questions below using only books written by women
  • Feel free to use the same graphics
  • Tag 8 others to take part in the tag

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Women’s history month is one of my favorite topical posts to create. I debated about using the same format I’ve used in the past, but then I came across Lisa’s tag post last week and “bingo!” I knew this was the direction for this year’s post celebrating women characters, women authors, and women’s achievement!

Book with an intelligent female character:

These are my favorite types of characters and I’ve met so many of them through the books I’ve read!

Invisible Woman by Erika Robuck

The Invisible Woman

Virginia is a complex and complicated character. She’s tough-minded, a demanding leader, cunning, and smart with her disguises, planning, and problem solving. (based on a real-life person)

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Spring 2021 TBR #TopTenTuesday

March 16, 2021

Spring Reading Season TBR (2021)

Spring Reading TBR

Image Source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

For spring, these are the ten books prioritized on my TBR Mountain. Three are carry overs from my Winter TBR.…for various reasons including distraction, too many ARCs, and availability from the library. Four are ARC (advanced reader copy) commitments. three are from my general TBR list.  They are a mix of genres, and I’m hoping for some winners here. Have you read any of these or is one on your TBR?

I never plan more than ten titles for my quarterly TBR lists because I need to leave time for mood reading and review commitments. These ten books (in no particular order) are a priority on a much longer general TBR.

What is your most anticipated read this spring?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Spring 2021 To Be Read List.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)


Spring 2021 TBR


First three books are carry overs from my Winter TBR:

Narrow Boat Summer by Anne Youngson

The Narrowboat Summer by Anne Youngson (cover) Image: a small boat floats down a lazy river in the countryside

Genre: Women’s Fiction
(author of Meet Me at the Museum)

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10 Awesome and Diverse Reads For #MiddleGradeMarch

March 2, 2021

10 Awesome and Diverse Reads For #MiddleGradeMarch

(top view) picture of a middle grade child reading on a recliner covered with a reddiish knitted afghan

Image Source: Canva

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

To participate in #middlegrademarch, I’ve compiled a list of ten diverse Middle-Grade reads! There are many wonderful middle-grade books from which to choose and even though I haven’t read extensively in middle grade, these titles are stories that I’ve recently read and thought were exceptional because of their themes and diversity. Reading builds understanding and compassion.

Often, children fall in love with reading in Middle Grade. Was this your experience? Children in Middle Grade have “learned to read” and they can fully immerse themselves in the world of words as they “read to learn” and “read for enjoyment.” They have more autonomy to choose their own reading material and can pursue individual interests. Many stories promote great family read-aloud experiences (or buddy reads). As a bonus, most Middle-Grade stories have heartfelt themes without the angst and/or profanity of YA.

What theme do you think Middle Grade books have in common?

For adults, Middle-Grade books make the perfect palate cleanser or fit the description of books that can be read in a day. If I’m feeling myself sliding into a reading “slump,” I often seek out a recommended Middle-Grade read to stimulate my reading life once again. I love that Middle-Grade books almost always end on a hopeful note. This theme of hopefulness is one of the main reasons I love reading in the Middle-Grade genre. I strongly believe that great Middle-Grade literature can be enjoyed by adults! Here’s an entire post devoted to why I love MG.

In addition to the above reasons to read Middle-Grade literature, I appreciate the authors who write diversely for Middle-Grade readers and write on difficult themes or topics in an easy-to-read and understandable manner. If we buy and read more Middle-Grade diverse literature, it will encourage publishers and writers to produce more. I think it’s important for children to see themselves in literature.

Middle-Grade Literature

(in no particular order)

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February 2021 Reading Wrap Up

February 27, 2021

February 2021 Reading Wrap Up

February 2021 Reading Wrap Up (Image: a collage of book covers)

How was your February reading?

It feels like February was a short book-reading month: I had zero five-star reads, six four-star reads, one three-star read, and one two-star read. Find all my February reads listed below in order of Star Rating. Keep in mind that I normally recommend five- and four-star reads on the blog; three-star reads receive mixed reviews from me for various reasons; and two-star reads are books that were not for me. One-star reads are usually shelved as DNF.

My favorite read of the month is Surviving Savannah by Patti Callahan followed closely by The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee.

Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my available reviews are linked
.
ARC=Advanced Readers Copy


Surviving Savannah by Patti Callahan (cover) Image: a woman stands against a rail with her back to the camera overlooking a harbor

Surviving Savannah (ARC) by Patti Callahan

4.5  Stars (rounded to 5) (ARC). Compelling and unputdownable historical fiction.
Pub Date: 3/9/21 My review of Surviving Savannah here.


The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee (cover) Image: a teenage Asian girl wearing a fancy hat in an 1890s style

The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee

4 Stars. (YA) Engaging Historical Fiction (non WW11). My review of Downstairs Girl here.


Love is a Revolution by Renee Watson (cover) Image: a picture of a plus size Black girl surrounded by four smaller images of the same girl and her boyfriend

Love Is a Revolution by Renée Watson

4 Stars. (YA)  Contemporary Fiction. Review of Love Is a Revolution here.


Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (cover) Image: white text with a maroon top and bottom border and branches with white blooms

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

4 Stars  Historical Fiction (classic).


Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West (cover) Image: a young woman stands in profile against a pink, orange, and yellow background

Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West

4 Stars. Contemporary Fiction.


The Woman With the Blue Star by Pam Jenoff (cover) Image: a tight focus on a pair of red shoes and a drawing of the Star of David on a cobblestone path

The Woman With the Blue Star (ARC) by Pam Jenoff

4 Stars. (ARC) WW11 Historical Fiction.
Pub Date: 5/4/21 Review: 5/3/21


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#BlackHistoryMonth: 10 Reading Ideas

February 26, 2021

10 Reading Ideas for Black History Month

black history month

Image Source: Canva

I support reading Black authors all year, especially in February.

I hope you are inspired by reading ideas for Black History Month! Have you read any of these titles? Please add your recommendations in the comments.

Books are listed in no particular order: 5 of my most recent reads and 5 older must reads.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.



5 Recommended Recent Reads



Isaiah Dunn Is My Hero by Kelly Baptist (cover) Image: the back view of a middle grade boy wearing a blue superhero cape and holding a pencil

Isaiah Dunn Is My Hero by Kelly J. Baptist (Middle Grade) My review of Isaiah Dunn here.


Love is a Revolution by Renee Watson (cover) Image: a picture of a plus size Black girl surrounded by four smaller images of the same girl and her boyfriend

Love Is a Revolution by Renée Watson (YA) My review of Love Is a Revolution here.


Piecing Me Together

Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson (MG) Not yet reviewed, but this is a lovely Middle Grade read!


Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West (cover) Image: a young woman stands in profile against a pink, orange, and yellow background

Saving Ruby King by Catherine Adel West  Emotionally difficult and well written.


Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (cover) Image: white text with a maroon top and bottom border and branches with white blooms

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston An emotional and intense classic.



5 Highly Recommended Must Reads



These are books that I’ve read in the past years that are on my must read and highly recommended list.

just mercy

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson (Memoir, Non Fiction, Racial Tension and Injustice). 4 Stars. My review of Just Mercy here.


Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi (cover) Image: gold text on light pink (top half) and black (bottom half) background

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi (family drama, addiction, faith and science, mental health)
5 Stars. My review of Transcendent Kingdom here.


Homegoing

Homegoing by Yaa Guasi (historical fiction, family multi generational saga)
This book is ambitious in its structure and memorable in its story telling….it hasn’t received enough attention! 5 Stars.


The Warmth of Other Suns

The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson  (historical narrative nonfiction). Ambitious history of black migration across the U.S. from post Civil War to the 1970s. 4 Stars (heavy on history….the three personal stories are memorable and heartfelt). A must read.


The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (contemporary fiction, racial tensions, YA)
Inspired by the Black Lives Matter Movement. 5 Stars. My review of THUG Here.



QOTD:

Did you find a book to add to your TBR?

Share your own recommendations in comments!



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
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***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book covers are credited to Amazon.

© ReadingLadies.com



10 Books That Made Me Smile #TopTenTuesday

February 23, 2021

10 Books That Made Me Smile #TopTenTuesday

10 Books That Made Me Smile (image: a woman seated with her hand at her chin looking up and laughing)

Image Source: Canva

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

What is the last book that made you smile?

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Make Me Laugh Out Loud. (Except that I haven’t read any that actually made me laugh out loud, so I’m tweaking this for books that made me smile!)

It’s posts like these that cause me to realize that the majority of my reading is really intense! I do love Quirky Characters, so mostly quirky characters provide the levity in my reading life.

These are the first ten books that I came across in my Goodreads list that brought a smile to my face. While none are hilarious or laugh out loud funny, each one has some funny or heartwarming moments that make my reading heart light and happy. Obviously, my list is heavily quirky character-driven! (Looking at you Backman!)

See my similar post (with a few different titles) published on July 14, 2020.

 *This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


How to Raise An Elephant, by Alexander McCall Smith

Kind, gracious, and wise Mma Precious Ramotswe and a cast of quirky supporting characters and the culture of Botswana bring many smiles to my face. This recent release of the No 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency had one laugh out loud moment as the guys attempt to transport a baby elephant in Mma Ramotswe’s van. If you are looking for easy-reading, gentle, comfort reads with likable characters and uplifting themes, this series might be a good option.

How to Raise an Elephant by Alexander McCall Smith (cover) Image: a baby elephant and parent elephant walking with trunks linked


The Bookish Life of Nina Hill by Abbi Waxman

Smart, snappy, and humorous writing with a likable and quirky character will bring a smile to your face. (skip Ch 5 if you are would rather not read crude humor)

The Bookish Life of Nina Hill


Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman

If you have children in your life, Backman’s essays on parenthood will bring a smile to your face. My review of Things My Son Needs to Know here.

Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman (cover)


This Won’t End Well by Camille Pagán

Some snappy writing, a quirky character, and an enemies to lovers trope will bring a smile to your face. My review of This Won’t End Well here.

This Won't End Well (cover) ....a young woman peeking through some bushes

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#6Degrees of Separation: From Redhead By the Side of the Road to Anxious People

February 6, 2021

#6Degrees of Separation: From Redhead By the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler to Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

#6Degrees of Separation From Redhead By the Side of the Road to Anxious People (a collage of covers listed in post)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Quirky Characters!

#6Degrees of Separation: from Redhead By the Side of the Road to Anxious People.

#6Degrees is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. I’ve seen this meme around for a while and Davida’s posts at The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog inspired me to give it a try this year! Making connections between books is challenging, creative, and fun!

Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. A book doesn’t need to be connected to all the other books on the list, only to the one next to it in the chain. The rules are:

  • Link the books together in any way you like.
  • Provide a link in your post to the meme at Books Are My Favourite and Best.
  • Share these rules in your post.
  • Paste the link to your post in the comments on Kate’s post and/or the Linky Tool on that post.
  • Invite your blog readers to join in and paste their links in the comments and/or the Linky Tool.
  • Share your post on Twitter using the #6Degrees hashtag.
  • Be nice! Visit and comment on other posts and/or retweet other #6Degrees posts.

Play Along?

Redhead By the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler (cover) Image: a man runs on the street with a cityscape in the backgroundThis month’s prompt starts with Redhead By the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler, and I’m thrilled because the story features a quirky character.

If you’ve followed my blog for long, you know how I absolutely adore an endearing quirky character! I cannot help myself in creating this chain with a theme of quirky characters! Because our chain begins with a male quirky character, I have attempted to use male characters in the chain with the exception of the last book in the chain which includes a cast of quirky characters.

Amazon Summary: “Micah Mortimer is a creature of habit. A self-employed tech experts and superintendent of his Baltimore apartment building, Micah seems content leading a steady, circumscribed life. But one day his routines are blown apart when his woman friend tells him she’s facing eviction, and a teenager shows up at Micah’s door claiming to be his son. These surprises, and the way they throw Micah’s meticulously organized life off-kilter, risk changing him forever.”

The Unlikely Pilgrimmage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (cover)First Degree. From Redhead, I think of my next quirky male character, Harold Fry in The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce.

My Summary: “Harold Fry is recently retired and lives in a small English village with his wife. After a long marriage, they have their differences but have settled into an amicable, predictable, and manageable daily routine. One day, a letter arrives for Harold from a woman (former co worker) that he hasn’t heard from in twenty years. Queenie is writing from a hospice to say goodbye. In the process of mailing his reply, Harold decides that he must deliver his message in person and decides to walk. As Harold impulsively sets out on his quest, he figures out the logistics of the six hundred mile journey as he goes. On the way he meets interesting people, finds plenty of time to reflect back on his life, and confronts some unsettling thoughts and feelings that he has buried.” My review of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry here.

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a man with a cat brushing against his legs stands in an open field with his back to the cameraSecond Degree: Another story with an older quirky character is A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman.

Goodreads Summary: “A grumpy yet lovable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moved in next door. Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time? Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

The Music Shop by Rachel Joyce (cover) Image: a woman with short brown hair and wearing a green coat stands with her back to the camera against an orange backgroundThird Degree: The next book with a quirky character is Frank in The Music Shop by Rachel Joyce.

My Summary: “Set in the 1980s on a run-down street in a forgotten suburb of London, there is a small indie music shop that is jam-packed with vinyl records of every kind. Frank, the shop’s owner, has a way of connecting his customers with the exact piece of music they never knew they needed, he welcomes the lonely, and he goes out of his way to help others. One ordinary day, a beautiful young woman in a green coat, Ilse Brauchmann, comes into his music shop and changes his life. Frank feels an attraction to her and yet he fears developing any closeness; in spite of his reservations, he begins to teach her about music and they develop a close friendship based on their common musical interests. Frank is terrified of his feelings for Ilse, yet he’s drawn to this strangely still, mysterious woman with eyes as black as vinyl. It’s complicated because Ilse has secrets and Frank has a past that haunts him. Readers find out about Frank’s life with his eccentric mother through flashbacks; however, Ilse remains mysterious. While Frank and Ilse contemplate the risks of a relationship, there are events in the community that threaten the livelihood of all the small, independent shops including Frank’s music shop. A further complication for Frank is the growing popularity of cassette tapes and CDs while Frank cherishes the world of vinyl.My review of The Music Shop here.

The Story of Authur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg (cover) Image: a man holds a yellow umbrella over a young womanFourth Degree: Connecting to the strong theme of a quirky character is Arthur in The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg.

My Summary: “At first glance, Arthur shares certain things in common with Ove (A Man Called Ove): each is an older, mature character, each is a widower grieving the loss of a beloved wife, and each finds “family” in unexpected ways.

On one of Arthur’s routine trips to the cemetery to have lunch and conversation with his wife, he meets Maddy, a troubled teenage girl who hides in the cemetery to avoid school. She discovers that Arthur is a friendly, understanding, trustworthy, and positive person and gives dear Arthur the nickname “Truluv.” Arthur and Maddy develop a friendship and when Arthur’s nosy neighbor, Lucille, becomes involved, they discover the joys of ‘found family’.” My review of Arthur Truluv here.

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick (cover) Image: an older man sits on the edge of a blue sofa, framed pictures hang on a blue wallFifth Degree: Continuing the theme of a quirky character with another Arthur in The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick.

 Goodreads Summary: “In this poignant and sparkling debut, a lovable widower embarks on a life-changing adventure. Sixty-nine-year-old Arthur Pepper lives a simple life. He gets out of bed at precisely 7/30 a.m., just as he did when his wife, Miriam, was alive. He dresses in the same gray slacks and mustard sweater vest, waters his fern, Frederica, and heads out to his garden. But on the one-year anniversary of Miriam’s death, something changes. Sorting through Miriam’s possessions, Arthur finds an exquisite gold charm bracelet he’s never seen before. What follows is a surprising and unforgettable odyssey that takes Arthur from London to Paris and as far as India in an epic quest to find out the truth about his wife’s secret life before they met–a journey that leads him to find hope, healing, and self-discovery in the most unexpected places. Featuring an unforgettable cast of characters with big hearts and irresistible flaws, The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper is a curiously charming debut and a joyous celebration of life’s infinite possibilities.”

Anxious People by Fredrik Backman (cover) Image: a man and woman stand against a railing with backs to the cameraSixth Degree: The final link in the chain is one more story of several quirky characters in Anxious People by Fredrik Backman.

My Summary: Anxious People is the story of a bank robber and a group of hostages at an open house…a bunch of idiots, really (in the most endearing sense of the word). But the real story behind the circumstances is about a bridge and so much more.” My review of Anxious People here.

 

 


I hope you enjoyed this #6Degrees of Separation chain from Redhead By the Side of the Road  to Anxious People!

The most striking thread that connects the stories in this chain is quirky characters (mostly male). I have read all these books can highly recommend them all!

I need to note that these are the first six books I thought to connect. Many stories are out there that could also fit this chain. Can you think of another title that features quirky characters?



ICYMI:

January #6Degrees of Separation post here.

If you have a February #6Degrees of Separation post, please leave a link in the comments!



QOTD!

Do you have ideas for creating your own chain?
What book would you add to this chain?
Have you read one of these stories?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

The book cover and the author’s photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

January 2021 Reading Wrap Up

January 31, 2021

January 2021 Reading Wrap Up

January 2021 Reading Wrap Up (collage of book covers)

How was your January reading?

January was an eleven book reading month: I had zero five-star reads, seven four-star reads, three three-star reads, and one two-star read. I also had one DNF. Find all my January reads listed below in order of Star Rating. Keep in mind that I normally recommend five- and four-star reads on the blog; three-star reads receive mixed reviews from me for various reasons; and two-star reads are books that were not for me. One-star reads are usually shelved as DNF.

My favorite read of the month is the Great Escape From Woodslands Nursing Home by Joanna Nell (contemporary fiction) closely followed by The Invisible Woman by Erika Robuck (WW11 histfic).

Did we read any of the same books?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.
Titles are Amazon affiliate links and my available reviews are linked
.


The Great Escape From Woodlands Nursing Home by Joanna Nell (cover) Image: a tree, a bench, and a dog....black text on white background

The Great Escape From Woodlands Nursing Home by Joanna Nell

4.5  Stars. (ARC). Heartfelt contemporary fiction. Quirky, mature characters.
Review of The Great Escape From Woodlands Nursing Home here.


The Invisible Woman (ARC) by Erika Robuck

4.5 Stars. (ARC)  Histfic WW11. Pub Date: 2/9/2021. Review of Invisible Woman here.


Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson

4.5 Stars  Contemporary YA fiction. A gentler The Hate U Give with similar themes. Review coming soon.


Inside Out & Back Again y Thannha Lai (cover) ....a girl holding onto a tree trunk with one hand on a breezy day

Inside Out & Back Again by Thannha Lai

4.5-5 Stars. Middle-Grade histfic (Vietnamese refugees). This is a reread and I enjoyed it as much as the first time. My brief review of Inside Out & Back Again can be found in this post.


The Answer Is…Reflections On My Life by Alex Trebek

4 Stars. (NF) Memoir. Candid reflections on his life by beloved game show host of Jeopardy!, Alex Trebek. Review of The Answer Is… here.


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