1st Line/1st Paragraph: What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon

 June 25, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon. If you love historical fiction, a love story, and time travel, this may be a good read for you.

From Amazon:  Anne Gallagher grew up enchanted by her grandfather’s stories of Ireland. Heartbroken at his death, she travels to his childhood home to spread his ashes. There, overcome with memories of the man she adored and consumed by a history she never knew, she is pulled into another time. Caught between history and her heart, she must decide whether she’s willing to let go of the life she knew for a love she never thought she’d find. But in the end, is the choice actually hers to make?

What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

What The Wind Knows

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, Love Story, Time Travel

1st Line/1st Few Paragraphs:

“Grandfather, tell me about your mother.” He was silent as he smoothed my hair, and for a long moment, I thought he hadn’t heard me.

“She was beautiful. Her hair was dark, her eyes green, just like yours are.”

“Do you miss her?” Tears leaked out the sides of my eyes and made his shoulder wet beneath my cheek. I missed my mother desperately.

“Not anymore,” my grandfather soothed.

“Why?” I was suddenly angry with him. How could he betray her that way? It was his duty to miss her.

“Because she is still with me.”

This made me cry harder.

“Hush now, Annie. Be still. Be still. If you are crying, you won’t be able to hear.”

“Hear what?” I gulped, slightly distracted from my anguish.

“The wind. It’s singing.”

I perked up, lifting my head slightly, listening for what my grandfather could hear. “I don’t hear a song,” I contended.

“Listen closer. Maybe it’s singing for you.” It howled and hurried, pressing against my bedroom window.

“I hear the wind,” I confessed, allowing the sound to lull me. “But it isn’t singing a very pretty song. It sounds more like it’s shouting.”

“Maybe the wind is trying to get your attention. Maybe it has something very important to say,” he murmured. 

After reading From Sand and Ash last year, I declared Amy Harmon a favorite author. I’m eager to dive into her new title after reading a few glowing reviews. I’m not that enamored with time travel but I do love a good love story, so we’ll see how this goes!



QOTD:

Have you read From Sand and Ash?

Do you love time travel stories?



 Looking Ahead:

Coming next week! A special collaboration post with twelve other bloggers as we each give our recommendation for ONE great summer book!

One Great Summer Read



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

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1st Line/1st Paragraph: Searching For Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok

 June 25, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Searching For Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of Searching For Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok. If you appreciate family dynamics, diverse reads, and mystery, this may be a good read for you.

From Amazon:  A poignant and suspenseful drama that untangles the complicated ties binding three women—two sisters and their mother—in one Chinese immigrant family and explores what happens when the eldest daughter disappears. A deeply moving story of family, secrets, identity, and longing, Searching for Sylvie Lee is both a gripping page-turner and a sensitive portrait of an immigrant family. It is a profound exploration of the many ways culture and language can divide us and the impossibility of ever truly knowing someone—especially those we love.

Searching For Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

Searching For Sylvie Lee

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Asian American, Family Life, Mystery

1st Line/1st (2) Paragraphs:

I am standing by the window of our small apartment in Queens, watching as Ma and Pa leave for their jobs. Half-hidden by the worn curtains Ma sewed herself, I see them walk side by side to the subway station down the street. At the entrance, they pause and look at each other for a moment. Here, I always hold my breath, waiting for Pa to touch Ma’s cheek, or for Ma to burst into tears, or for either of them to give some small sign of the truth of their relationship. Instead, Ma raises her hand in an awkward wave, the drape of her black shawl exposing her slender forearm, and Pa shuffles into the open mouth of the station as the morning traffic roars down our busy street. Then Ma ducks her head and continues her walk to the local dry cleaners where she works.

I sigh and step away from the window. I should be doing something more productive. Why am I still spying on my parents? Because I’m an adult living at home and have nothing better to do. If I don’t watch out, I’m going to turn into Ma. Timid, dutiful, toiling at a job that pays nothing. And yet, I’ve caught glimpses of another Ma and Pa over the years. The passion that flickers over her face as she reads Chinese romane novels in the night, the ones Pa scorns. The way Pa reaches for her elbow when he walks behind her, catches himself, and pulls back his hand. I pass by my closet of a bedroom, and the poster that hangs on the wall catches my eye–barely visible behind the teetering piles of papers and laundry. It’s a quote I’ve always loved from Willa Cather: “The heart of another is a dark forest, always, no matter how close it has been to one’s own.” I’m not sure I believe the sentiment but her words never fail to unsettle me.

Searching For Sylvie Lee finally reached the top of my library hold list. Not only is it on my 2019 Summer TBR, but Jenna (from The Today Show Book Club) selected it for the June read. Here’s a clip of Jenna and author Jean Kwok.

So far I’ve read five chapters and can report that it’s easy reading and quietly engaging as everyone begins to realize that Sylvie is missing. Have you read Searching For Sylvie Lee?



QOTD:

Do you enjoy reading hyped books or do you avoid them until the buzz dies down?

Most of the time I want to read them (so I can offer you reviews of recent releases), but there have been times when I ignore the buzz and later find out that the buzz was short lived and I decide to pass on it…..or as time passes, more honest reviews are published and I decide it’s not for me after all.



 Looking Ahead:

Friday, I’m publishing my list of favorite books so far this year.

Coming soon! A special collaboration post with twelve other bloggers as we each give our recommendation for ONE great summer book!

One Great Summer Read



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

 

 

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Miracle Creek by Angie Kim

June 25, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Miracle Creek by Angie Kim

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of Miracle Creek by Angie Kim. If you appreciate family dynamics and courtroom drama, this may be a good read for you.

From Amazon:  How far will we go to protect our families―and our deepest secrets? Angie Kim’s Miracle Creek is a thoroughly contemporary take on the courtroom drama, drawing on the author’s own life as a Korean immigrant, former trial lawyer, and mother of a real-life “submarine” patient. Both a compelling page-turner and an excavation of identity and the desire for connection, Miracle Creek is a brilliant, empathetic debut from an exciting new voice.

Miracle Creek by Angie Kim

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

Miracle Creek

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Mystery/Thriller, Courtroom Drama, Family Dynamics

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

My husband asked me to lie. Not a big lie. He probably didn’t even consider it a lie, and neither did I, at first. It was such a small thing, what he wanted. The police had just released the protesters, and while he stepped out to make sure they weren’t coming back, I was to sit in his chair. Cover for him, the way coworkers do as a matter of course, the way we ourselved used to at the gracery store, while I ate or he smoked. But as I took his seat, I bumped against the desk, and the certificate above it went slightly crooked as if to remind me that this wasn’t a regular business, that there was a reason he’d never left me in charge before.

My library hold on Miracle Creek just came in, and it’s timely because it’s on my 2019 Summer TBR.  Although this is not my usual genre, I’m looking forward to the read because I see it frequently promoted and reviewed and FOMO is real. So far, I’ve read the first chapter and the story is engaging from page one. Have you read it?



QOTD:

Do you enjoy reading hyped books or do you avoid them until the buzz dies down?

Most of the time I want to read them (so I can offer you reviews of recent releases), but there have been times when I ignore the buzz and later find out that the buzz was short lived and I decide to pass on it…..or as time passes, more honest reviews are published and I decide it’s not for me after all.



 Looking Ahead:

Friday, I’m publishing my review for Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini.

Resistance Women

Sunday, I’ll publish my June Wrap Up and I’m also working on a post which will highlight my favorite reads for the first half of 2019.

Coming soon! A special collaboration post with twelve other bloggers as we each give our recommendation for ONE great summer book!

One Great Summer Read



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

 

 

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

June 18, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini. If you appreciate an abundance of history in your historical fiction, this may be the read for you.

From Amazon: From the New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker, an enthralling historical saga that recreates the danger, romance, and sacrifice of an era and brings to life one courageous, passionate American—Mildred Fish Harnack—and her circle of women friends who waged a clandestine battle against Hitler in Nazi Berlin. Inspired by actual events, Resistance Women is an enthralling, unforgettable story of ordinary people determined to resist the rise of evil, sacrificing their own lives and liberty to fight injustice and defend the oppressed.

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

Resistance Women

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Southern Fiction, Women’s Fiction, Family Life, Mothers/Daughters

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

The heavy iron doors open and for a moment Mildred stands motionless and blinking in the sunlight, breathless from the sudden rush of cool, fresh air caressing her face and lifting her hair. The guard propels her forward into the prison yard, his grip painful and unyielding around her upper arm. Other women clad in identical drab, shapeless garments walk slowly in pairs around the perimeter of the gravel square. Their cells within the Hausgefangnis of the Gestapo’s Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse headquarters are so cramped that they can scarcely move, and now the prisoners spread their arms and lift their faces to the sky, like dancers, like dry autumn leaves scattered in a gust of wind.

How many of them would never again know more freedom than this?

I have read about 25% of Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini. So far, this is a leisurely paced histfic and not a page-turner. While some hisfic reads like women’s fiction in an historical setting, this is packed with vivid historical details and history takes center stage. In addition, there are interesting characters, and it prompted me to ask my husband this morning to refresh my memory between the exact differences of Communism, Socialism, and Fascism. Chiaverini’s prose is lovely and it’s easy and smooth reading, except when stopping to ponder political parties and the gravity of what’s happening. Often in WW11 histfic, we get thrown into the middle of the story. Chiaverini starts this story in 1929 so that we can experience the build-up to the war. Fans of Dietrich Bonhoeffer will appreciate references to him in the reading because one of the main characters, Mildred, marries Bonhoeffer’s cousin. I’m looking forward to continuing to learn about the brave actions of these three inspiring women, but at 600+ pages, it will take some time!



QOTD:

Is Resistance Women on your TBR?



Looking Ahead:

Friday, I hope to bring you a review of The Secret of Clouds by Alyson Richman. (My very last spring TBR title!)

The Secret of Clouds

Next week, it will be time for my June Wrap Up and I’m also working on a post which will highlight my favorite reads for the first half of 2019.



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

June 18, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini. If you appreciate an abundance of history in your historical fiction, this may be the read for you.

From Amazon: From the New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker, an enthralling historical saga that recreates the danger, romance, and sacrifice of an era and brings to life one courageous, passionate American—Mildred Fish Harnack—and her circle of women friends who waged a clandestine battle against Hitler in Nazi Berlin. Inspired by actual events, Resistance Women is an enthralling, unforgettable story of ordinary people determined to resist the rise of evil, sacrificing their own lives and liberty to fight injustice and defend the oppressed.

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

Resistance Women

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Southern Fiction, Women’s Fiction, Family Life, Mothers/Daughters

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

The heavy iron doors open and for a moment Mildred stands motionless and blinking in the sunlight, breathless from the sudden rush of cool, fresh air caressing her face and lifting her hair. The guard propels her forward into the prison yard, his grip painful and unyielding around her upper arm. Other women clad in identical drab, shapeless garments walk slowly in pairs around the perimeter of the gravel square. Their cells within the Hausgefangnis of the Gestapo’s Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse headquarters are so cramped that they can scarcely move, and now the prisoners spread their arms and lift their faces to the sky, like dancers, like dry autumn leaves scattered in a gust of wind.

How many of them would never again know more freedom than this?

I have read about 25% of Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini. So far, this is a leisurely paced histfic and not a page-turner. However, it is packed with historical details, interesting characters, and it prompted me to ask my husband this morning to refresh my memory between the exact diffrences of Communism, Socialism, and Facism. Chiaverini’s prose is lovely and it’s easy and smooth reading, except when stopping to ponder political parties and the gravity of what’s happening. Often in WW11 histfic, we get thrown into the middle of the story. Chiaverini starts this story in 1929 so that we can experience the build up to the war. Fans of Dietrich Bonhoeffer will appreciate references to him in the reading because one of the main characters, Mildred, marries Bonhoeffer’s cousin. I’m looking forward to continuing to learn about the brave actions of these three inspiring women, but at 600+ pages, it will take some time!



QOTD:

Is Resistance Women on your TBR?



Looking Ahead:

Friday, I hope to bring you a review of The Secret of Clouds by Alyson Richman. (My very last spring TBR title!)

The Secret of Clouds

Next week, it will be time for my June Wrap Up and I’m also working on a post which will highlight my favorite reads for the first half of 2019.



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

1st Line/1st Paragraph: The Cactus by Sarah Haywood

June 4, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: The Cactus by Sarah Haywood

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of The Cactus by Sarah Haywood. If you follow the Reese Witherspoon Instagram Book Club @reesesbookclubxhellosunshine this is her June pick. I don’t always read the selections, but she had me at “quirky” character.

From Amazon: In this charming and poignant debut, one woman’s unconventional journey to finding love means learning to embrace the unexpected. For Susan Green, messy emotions don’t fit into the equation of her perfectly ordered life. She has a flat that is ideal for one, a job that suits her passion for logic, and an “interpersonal arrangement” that provides cultural and other, more intimate, benefits. But suddenly confronted with the loss of her mother and the news that she is about to become a mother herself, Susan’s greatest fear is realized. She is losing control.

The Cactus by Sarah Haywood

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

The Cacrus

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction, England, Family Life, Mothers/Daughters

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

I’m not a woman who bears grudges, broods over disagreements or questions other people’s motives. Neither do I feel compelled to win an argument at any cost. As with all rules, of course, there are exceptions. I won’t stand idly by while one person’s being exploited by another, and the same goes when I’m the one being exploited; I’ll do everything within my means to ensure that Justice prevails. Not surprisingly, then, the events that have unfolded this month have left me with no choice but to take immediate and decisive action.

I have read about 61% of The Cactus by Sarah Haywood. My first impression is that Susan is more unlikeable and difficult than quirky. For me, quirky is a word that has an endearing component. Susan is prickly! She is set in her ways and her life is regimented and compartmentalized…..perhaps she is on the spectrum or has suffered some trauma. In addition, she doesn’t have a great relationship with her mother or her brother, and her alcoholic father (for whom she did feel more affection) has died. Susan experienced a great deal of distress in childhood because of her alcoholic father’s behaviors, she doesn’t have many real friends, and she is not close to her extended family. When we first meet her, she’s a loner and runs her lonely life efficiently. I’m gradually warming up to Susan and she may be endearing before story’s end. The blurb on the book indicates that if readers love Eleanor Oliphant, they will love this book. The jury is still out on that point. So far, Eleanor still holds the gold standard of quirky (and endearing)! If you love quirky, you might want to give The Cactus a try. The first paragraph is interesting because the story so far feels exactly like “exceptions” to her rules! I’m invested in finding out how this turns out for her. Stay tuned for my full review in a few weeks…



QOTD: Do you love stories about quirky characters?

If you follow my reviews you know I have a soft spot for quirky characters. I think I’ll do a full post on this subject in the near future.

Who’s your favorite quirky character?



Looking Ahead:

I have reviews coming soon for On the Come Up, The Lost For Words Bookshop, The Cactus, and The River.



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

1st Line/1st Paragraph: The River

May 29, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph: The River

I’m linking up this week with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of The River by Peter Heller. I’ve read a few great reviews, and I’m eager to bring you my full review soon. If you spend time fishing, camping, and canoeing, you might appreciate this wilderness survival/suspense thriller set in the Canadian wilderness.

From Amazon: From the best-selling author of The Dog Stars, The River is the story of two college students on a wilderness canoe trip–a gripping tale of friendship tested by fire, white water, and violence. From the charged beginning, master storyteller Peter Heller unspools a headlong, heart-pounding story of desperate wilderness survival.

The River by Peter Heller

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

The River

Genre/Categories: Fiction, Thriller, Suspense, Wilderness Survival, Adventure, Friendship

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

They had been smelling smoke for two days. At first they thought it was another campfire and that surprised them because they had not heard the engine of a plane and they had been traveling the string of long lakes for days and had not seen sign of another person or even the distant movement of another canoe. The only tracks in the mud of the portages were wolf and moose, otter, bear. The winds were west and north and they were moving north so if it was another party they were ahead of them. It perplexed them because they were smelling smoke not only in early morning and at night, but would catch themselves at odd hours lifting their noses like coyotes, nostrils flaring.

I have read about 50% of The River. I can report that it’s a great balance of character driven and plot driven content. The description settings are vivid and beautifully written. The River explores the character of two college friends who share a deep friendship, a love of the mountains, books, and fishing. Throughout the story, we also observe that they have a great deal of respect for each other. These are good guys. What starts out as an enjoyable wilderness trip goes horribly wrong as the young men need to outrace a forest fire, save a life, and protect themselves from a violent stranger. I’m eager to see how this ends!



QOTD: Are you intrigued? Do you like wilderness survival stories?



Looking Ahead:

Come back Friday for my May Reading Wrap Up!



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

1st Line/1st Paragraph

May 21, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph

I’m linking up today with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first paragraph of On the Come Up by Angie Thomas (Young Adult). I’ve read a few great reviews, and I’m eager to bring you my full review soon. If you read The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas, you might appreciate this new release!

From Amazon: Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn’t always free.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

On the Come Up

Genre/Categories: Young Adult Contemporary Fiction, Music, Poverty, Homelessness, Racism, Prejudice

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

I might have to kill somebody tonight.

It could be somebody I know. It could be a stranger. It could be somebody who’s never battled before. It could be somebody who’s a pro at it. It doesn’t matter how many punch lines they spit or how nice their flow is. I’ll have to kill them.

This first paragraph sounds dire and extreme, and I might jump to conclusions that the character is literally speaking of murder. However, Brianna’s actually thinking about her chance to prove herself at a neighborhood rap contest tonight. This might be her big chance.

I’ve read Chapter One, and I’m eager to continue the story and trust Angie Thomas that On The Come Up will be gritty, relevant, and thought-provoking.



QOTD: Are you intrigued? Have you read The Hate You Give?

Here is my full review of The Hate You Give.



Looking Ahead:

Come back Friday for my review of The Scent Keeper by Erica Bauermeister, one of my favorite reads of the year so far!

The Scent Keeper



Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

1st Line/1st Chapter

May 7, 2019

1st Line/1st Chapter

I’m linking up today with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first full chapter of Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott (mature Middle Grade/Young Adult/Adult). I’ve read a few great reviews, and I’m eager to bring you my full review soon. If you appreciate free verse, you might love this!

From Goodreads: Paper Hearts is the story of survival, defiance, and friendship. Based on historical events about a group of girls who were slave laborers at the munitions factory in Auschwitz.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links

Paper Hearts 2

Genre/Categories: Historical Fiction, WW11, Holocaust, Survival, Poetry

1st Line/1st Chapter:

Through the village
once loved.
Eyes lowered
not shamed
footsteps steady
not faster
or slower
than before.

Ignored jeers.
Ignored curses,
Brudny Żyd!
Dirty Jew!
The clump of mud
thrown by Oleg Broz
who’d gone to the same school as
me
whose father worked at the
same bank as me.

(more…)

1st Line/1st Paragraph

May 7, 2019

1st Line/1st Paragraph

I’m linking up today with Vicki @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach who hosts a meme every Tuesday to share the First Chapter/First Paragraph of the book you are currently reading.

First Paragraph

I’m pleased to share the first line and first full paragraph of The Lost For Words Bookshop. I just finished this book late last night, and I’m eager to bring you my full review soon. *Spoiler: If you loved Eleanor Oliphant, you will love this!

 

 

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

The Lost for Words Bookshop

Genre/Categories: Contemporary Fiction

1st Line/1st Paragraph:

“A book is a match in the smoking second between strike and flame.”

“Archie says books are our best lovers and our most provoking friends. He’s right, but I’m right, too. Books can really hurt you.”

Are you intrigued? Have you read this?

Our main character, Lovejoy Cardew, is tattooed with the first lines of a few of her most memorable reads …. so you know that the first line of this book will be a good one!


Sharing is Caring

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
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***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.