A Place to Hang the Moon [Book Review]

June 10, 2022

A Place to Hang the Moon by Kate Albus

A Place to Hang tthe Moon by Kate Albus (cover) Image: three children stand on the steps of a library

Genre/Categories/Setting: Middle Grade, Historical Fiction, WW11, Found Family, Siblings, Books About Books, Books About Libraries/Librarians England

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

During WW11, Anna, Edmund, and William are evacuated from London to the countryside where it is safer from bombing. The children are seeking more than safety from bombs as they have just lost their grandmother, their only guardian, and are in need of a “forever” home. The children encounter cruelty, cold, and hunger. They find one place of comfort and refuge in the library; The librarian, Mrs. Müller becomes a significant person in their lives. With her, they experience cozy fires, hot chocolate, hot buttered thickly-sliced toast, bedtime stories, and someone who thinks they “hang the moon.”

My Thoughts:

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National Library Week 2022 #BooksAboutLibraries #NationalLibraryWeek #TopTenTuesday

April 5, 2022

National Library Week: April 3-9

National Library Week (image: a hand chooses a book from library shelves)

Image Source: Canva

I’m linking up today with That Artsy Reader Girl for Top Ten Tuesday “Freebie.” In celebration of National Library Week, my “freebie” topic is Books About Libraries and Librarians.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Do you have a library card?

Do you have more than one library card?

Do you have fond childhood memories of bringing home a pile of books from the library?

As a child, did you participate in a summer reading program at the library?

Have you ever taken your child to storytime at the library?

Have you ever gone to the library to study or research or for some quiet time?

Do you belong to a book club at the library?

Do you consider yourself a heavy library user?

Is your library card one of the prized possessions in your wallet?

Did you use your library more or less during the Pandemic?

What percentage of the books you’ve read this year are from the library?

National Library Week Graphic

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Even though I’ve switched over to reading digitally, I consider myself a heavy library user. In fact, over 50% of the books I read in a year are from the library.

The BEST feature of using your libraries digital lending app (like Libby or Overdrive) is that there are NO library fines because the book automatically disappears (is returned) on the due date.

Another benefit is that you can link up multiple library cards. I have two library cards linked, one for my local library and one for my county library.

Do you borrow books physically or digitally from your library?

Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore, achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life.
~Sidney Sheldon

giphy



Books About Libraries and Librarians



The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

5+ Stars. My Review Here. (the main character is a packhorse librarian)

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)


The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

5 Stars. My Review Here. (a teenage girl assumes responsibility for the underground library of Auschwitz)

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)


What You Wish For by Katherine Center

4 Stars. My Goodreads Review. (the main character is a school librarian)

What You Wish For by Katherine Center (cover) Image: bright flowers and the edge of a gold ferris wheel bordering a bright blue background


The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams

4 Stars. My review here. (multigenerational library friendship and one special book list)

The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams (cover) white text overe a graphic image of scattered open books


Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr

 4.5 Stars. My review here. (libraries of the past, present, and future)

Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr


The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson

4  Stars. My review here. (saving a library)

The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson (cover) Image: white block text on a blue background....the letters represent three bookshelves holding books and scenes from the library


The Library Book by Susan Orlean

(narrative nonfiction account of the 1986 fire at the Los Angeles Public Library). Not reviewed.

The Library Book by Susan Orlean (cover) Image: Gold lettering on a red background


The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles

4 Stars. My review here. (a library and the French Resistance)

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles (cover) Image: a woman sits on a wall with her back to the camera overlooking the Eiffel Tower in the distance


The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne

4.5 Stars. My review here. (surviving a blizzard in a library)

The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne (cover) white text over a background of shelved books


The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis

3 Stars. My review here. (the iconic New York City Public Library is the setting for this histfic story)

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis (cover) Image: a woman in a yellow dress stands with an open book inside a large museum type room



QOTD!

Do you have a library card?

Do you use Libby or Overdrive?

What is your favorite book about libraries or librarians?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© Readingladies.com

The Night of Many Endings [Book Review] #BlogTour

October 20, 2021

The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne

The Night of Many Endings by Melissa Payne (cover) Image: white text over a background of shelved books

Genre/Categories/Setting: Contemporary Fiction, Colorado, Drug Addiction, Public Library

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Welcome to my stop on the Let’s Talk Books Tour. Thanks #NetGalley #LetsTalkBooksPromo @LetsTalkBooksPromo @Getredprbooks @AmazonPublishing (Lake Union) for a complimentary eARC of #TheNightOfManyEndings by @MelissaPayne_writes upon my request. All opinions are my own.

Let's Talk Books (text plus a stack of three books inside a quote bubble

Nora Martinez is a kind and compassionate librarian in the small Colorado community of Silver Ridge. Nora has a heart for the homeless population and after work she can be found delivering blankets, coats, and food to those sleeping on city benches. She welcomes the homeless into the library to use the restroom, treats them compassionately, believes in second chances, and tries to learn their names.  Nora finds great comfort herself working in the library, and it becomes her home away from home. One reason she works tirelessly on behalf of the homeless is the concern she has for her brother who is living on the streets and is addicted to drugs. If she can’t help him, maybe she can help others. One night, a blizzard hits the small town and Nora and four others are stranded in the library overnight. As the storm rages outside, Nora and the patrons struggle to keep warm and to share their personal stories.

My Thoughts:

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The Last Chance Library [Book Review]

August 30, 2021

The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson

The Last Chance Library by Freya Sampson (cover) Image: white block text on a blue background.....text forms 3 shelves which hold graphic images of books and library scenes

Genre/Categories/Settings: Contemporary Fiction, Women’s Fiction, Books About Books, Librarians, Library, English Village

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Thanks #NetGalley @BerkleyPub #BerkleyWritesStrongWomen #BerkleyBuddyReads for a complimentary eARC upon my request. All opinions are my own.

A shy, lonely, and quirky librarian, June Jones, and a colorful cast of characters band together to fight against the closure of their local public library. Can June find courage for the fight and forge true friendships?

My Thoughts:

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The Paris Library [Book Review]

February 8, 2021

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles (cover) Imaged: a woman sits with her back to the camera on a wall overlooking Paris and the Eiffel Tower in the background

Genre/Categories: WW11, Historical Fiction, Paris, Books About Books

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Resistance in a silent and unlikely place…the importance of books…

Thank you, #NetGalley @AtriaBooks for a complimentary e ARC of #TheParisLibrary upon my request in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

The Paris Library is a dual timeline story of family, friendship, resistance, romance, betrayal, heroism, bravery, and books. In 1939, idealistic, courageous, and ambitious Odile Souchet works at the American Library in Paris when the Nazis arrive. Odile and the other librarians negotiate to keep the library open so they can protect the books and also make secret deliveries to their Jewish patrons. In 1983, Lily, a lonely teenager living in Montana, befriends a mysterious and reclusive, elderly, French neighbor woman and discovers they have a great deal in common.

black and white picture of the American Library in Paris

American Library in Paris Image Source: Wikipedia

My Thoughts:

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National Library Week: Are You Reading Digitally During Social Isolation?

April 20, 2020

National Library Week: April 19-25

 

Do you have a library card?

Do you have more than one library card?

Do you have fond childhood memories of bringing home a pile of books from the library?

As a child, did you participate in a summer reading program at the library?

Have you ever taken your child to storytime at the library?

Have you ever gone to the library to study or research or for some quiet time?

Do you belong to a book club at the library?

Do you consider yourself a heavy library user?

Is your library card one of the prized possessions in your wallet?

Are you using the library during social isolation?

What percentage of the books you’ve read this year are from the library?

National library week

Read Digitally During Social Isolation and National Library Week!

(scroll to the end to see some library-related book recs!)

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

Even though I’ve switched over to reading digitally, I consider myself a heavy library user. In fact, 55% of the thirty-one books I’ve read so far this year are from the library.

If your library is closed now or if you’re isolated at home due to COVID-19 lockdown conditions, this is the perfect time to consider borrowing ebooks from the library! If you visit your library’s website, it will most likely have an option for reading digital books. Your library’s website will likely have an app such as Libby or Overdrive that you can download. Then all you need to do is link your library card to the app and you can borrow digital books!

The BEST feature is that there are NO library fines because the book automatically disappears (is returned) on the due date. You can borrow print ebooks and audio ebooks.

If you do not have a library card and your library is closed, you might be able to apply for your library card online.

Using the Libby or Overdrive app, you can link up multiple library cards. I have two library cards linked, one for my local library and one for my county library.

In addition to the games on my iPad, my six-year-old grandson loves to open my Libby app and check out a children’s book to read!

A FAQ is what is the difference between Libby and Overdrive? My limited understanding is that they are basically the same and that Libby is an updated or newer version of Overdrive. Both work equally well and are synced with each other. I have both apps and I use them interchangeably. One feature of Overdrive that I like is that I’m able to request books for the library to purchase and I haven’t found that feature available on Libby. I like requesting a book for purchase because you are automatically put on the waiting list for that book and if the library purchases it, you will be near the top of the waiting list!

If you prefer not to read digitally, you can also go to your library website and check out all the resources that they have available for you!

Have I enticed you to use your library this week?

Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore, achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life.
~Sidney Sheldon

If you have ideas about using the library or if you work at a library and can add to the conversation, please comment!

giphy

I have created a short list of books that feature library settings or librarians!
(the first two are my favorite librarian stories!)
Can you add suggestions?

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

5+ Stars. My Review Here. (the main character is a packhorse librarian)

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson (cover)


The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

5 Stars. My Review Here. (a teenage girl assumes responsibility for the underground library of Auschwitz)

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)


What You Wish For by Katherine Center

4 Stars. My Goodreads Review. (the main character is a school librarian)

What You Wish For by Katherine Center (cover) Image: bright flowers and the edge of a gold ferris wheel bordering a bright blue background


The Library at the Edge of the World by Felicity Hates-McCoy

3 Stars. My Goodreads Review. (a save-the-library theme)

Library at the Edge of the World by Felicity Hayes-McCoy (cover) Image: a girl holding a book standing at the edge of a cliff overlooking the ocean


Lucy’s Little Village Book Club by Emma Davies

3 Stars. My Brief Goodreads review. (about a library-sponsored book club)

Lucy's Little Village Book Club by Emma Davies (cover) Image: a quaint village house set again a backdrop of rolling hills and blue skies


Harry’s Trees by Jon Cohen

3 Stars (a wonderful librarian in this story)

Harry's Trees by Jon Cohen (cover) Image: a large brown leaf on a blue background


The Library Book by Susan Orlean

(fictionalized account of the 1986 fire at the Los Angeles Public Library)

The Library Book by Susan Orlean (cover) Image: Gold lettering on a red background



QOTD!

Do you have a library card?

Do you use Libby or Overdrive?



ICYMI

National Poetry Month

Lighter Reads During Stressful Times

Ten Signs That I’m a Book Lover



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© Readingladies.com