When You Get the Chance [Book Review]

February 25, 2022

When You Get the Chance by Emma Lord

When You Get the Chance by Emma Lord (cover) Image: white text over the background graphic of a girl with long brown hair dressed in a hot pink crop top and jeans....against a hot pink background with a sprinkling of yellow stars

Genre/Categories/Setting: Young Adult Contemporary Fiction, Musical Theater, Coming of Age, New York City

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Millie Price is a high school senior and is obsessed with musical theater. In her determination to follow her dream, she applies to a competitive program that will jumpstart her career as a Broadway star. Her usually supportive father is against the idea and won’t sign the paperwork. Millie has been raised by her single dad and her bio mom has never been a part of her life. So, Millie plans to find her bio mom who works in theater so she can persuade her to sign the papers. (even though she has no legal guardianship of Millie and Millie doesn’t even know her name….so suspension of disbelief is required here). At the same time, Millie is also persuing a summer internship in the theater world. Competing for the same internship is Oliver her rival from drama club. Will Millie secure the internship? Will she get the signature she needs to finalize her acceptance into the elite program? Will she find her bio mom? And what about Oliver?

My Thoughts:

(more…)

The Last Train to London [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 24, 2022

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton
#throwbackthursday

The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton (cover)

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, WW11, Jewish, Nazi-Occupied Europe

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing one of my favorite inspirational historical fiction reads, The Last Train to London by Meg Waite Clayton.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Rescuing children, her life’s work…

The Last Train to London shares the story of real-life hero Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance who risked her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. (She was honored as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem. )

The mission known as Kindertransport carried thousands of children out of Nazi-occupied Europe. In addition to hearing about Tante Truus as she was known, the author imagines the lives of children such as Stephan (budding playwright), his younger brother. and Zofie-Helene (mathematics protegee).

Auntie Truus (headshot)Tante Truus: Image Source: Wikipedia

Courage isn’t the absence of fear, rather the going forward in the face of it…

Continue here for my full review of The Last Train to London…



QOTD:

Have you read The Last Train to London or is it on your TBR?

 

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature #TopTenTuesday

February 22, 2022

10 Favorite Dynamic Duos in Literature

Top Ten Tuesday 10 Favorite Dynamic Duos

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Dynamic Duos in Literature.

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

Who are your favorite Dynamic Duos?

Too many! Amirite?!

This is a FUN prompt! The following dynamic duos were the first to pop into my mind because if I overthink it, I’ll end up with a list of a hundred. See any favorites?

Who is your favorite dynamic duo?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

The Captain & Johanna
News of the World by Paulette Jiles
(the movie)

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (cover) Image: a prairie landscape under a big blue cloud filled sky

…fighting with dimes! IYKYK

2

Ryland & Rocky
Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…saving planets! IYKYK!

3

Jack & Wynn
The River by Peter Heller

 

The River by Peter Heller (cover) Image: white text over a background of red and dark blue swirly lines

survival!

4

Eudora & Rose
The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett

the Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons (cover) Image: two people by a pool...one sitting on the deck, the other holding her nose and jumping in

…multigenerational friendship

5

Eleanor & Raymond
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…friendship at its finest

6

Eliza and Alexander Hamilton
My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

…true partners!

7

Nostagic:
Charlotte & Wilbur
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
(the movie)

 

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White (cover) Image: a graphic image of a young girl, a pig, and a spider

…childhood favorite!

8

Sophie & Barry
Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

…castaways!

9

Hazel & Duncan
Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

…overcoming obstacles, building trust, and facing challenges

10

A Dynamic Trio: Osla, Mab, and Beth
The Rose Code by Kate Quinn

 

a woman dressed in a rose dress stands with her back to the camera overlooking a balcony and a gold wall

…a dynamic TRIO of brave and smart women!



QOTD:

Have you read and loved any of these?
What’s one of your favorite dynamic duos?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

The Woman They Could Not Silence [Book Review] #NarrativeNonfiction #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge

February 18, 2022

Do you have Narrative Nonfiction on your bookshelf?

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore (cover) Image: white text on a black muted background....the small graphic image of a quill and ink below the title

Today for the #WhatsOnYourBookshelfChallenge I’m focusing on “Narrative Nonfiction” (creative nonfiction or literary nonfiction) as I bring you a review of The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore.

Every year, I commit to reading more nonfiction. In nonfiction, I love Memoir, Biography, and Narrative Nonfiction. However, I think narrative nonfiction might be my favorite. After today’s review, I’ve included a few of my favorite “narrative nonfiction” titles.

Do you have a favorite Narrative Nonfiction title or recomendation?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


The Woman They Could Not Silence: One Woman, Her Incredible Fight for Freedom, and the Men Who Tried to Make Her Disappear by Kate Moore

Genre/Categories/Setting: Nonfiction, Narrative Nonfiction, Biographical, Mental Health, Women’s/Patient’s Rights, Insane Asylum (1860)

My Summary:

In 1860, wives and daughters could be committed to insane asylums by their husbands or fathers without their consent or proper mental health evaluations. Women were property owned by the husband or father. Women could be committed for being too emotional, opinionated, independent, zealous, or intellectual….basically, any woman who can’t be kept “in line.” When Elizabeth Packard is committed to an insane asylum by her husband, she discovers that she is not the only sane woman there. Because she is labeled “crazy,” no one will listen to her appeals or intervene on her behalf and she has no voice to fight for herself because it makes her appear even crazier. Her friends who may know the truth won’t speak up for fear of the same punishment from their husbands. However, after losing her home and her children, Elizabeth has nothing more to lose and is determined to fight for her life and for the lives of innocent women.

Elizabeth Packard

Elizabeth Packard

My Thoughts:

How far we’ve come! What a nightmare scenario for women! I became intrigued with this subject after I read Woman 99 by Greer Macallister. In that story, a daughter is commited to an insane asylum for being too emotional and her sister attempts a rescue. I knew I wanted to read more about women being unfairly committed.

First, What is Narrative Nonfiction?

“Narrative nonfiction, also known as creative nonfiction or literary nonfiction, is a true story written in the style of a fiction novel. The narrative nonfiction genre contains factual prose that is written in a compelling way—facts told as a story. While the emphasis is on the storytelling itself, narrative nonfiction must remain as accurate to the truth as possible” ~Source

Elizabeth:

Drawing heavily on court reports, newspaper articles, corresponsence, and journals, the author weaves a compelling story around the facts and Elizabeth’s own words. Through Elizabeth’s determination and fearless fighting spirit, she affects change for women. The resulting law reforms brought widespread, long-lasting change in the operation of insane asylums and granted married women the right of jury trial before commitment. Her fight and contributions should be remembered and honored.

Elizabeth is an incessent talker with strong opinions and a strong will. These were textbook examples of female insanity at the time. During her confinement, Elizabeth feels like an asylum is a “storage unit for unsatisfactory wives.” Women are deemed “cured” when they become “quiet, decorous in manners and language.” Using her brilliant mind and her ability to write, Elizabeth is determined “to write her way out of her hellhole if it is the last thing she does.” She demonstrates that “a spirit cannot be killed. With spirit comes hope. With spirit comes strength. With spirit comes the energy to start the fight for justice.”

“Wronged women were not supposed to stand up for themselves. Wronged women were not supposed to come out fighting, or be angry, or battle for injustice to be overturned. Elizabeth’s course was unnatural in [McFarland’s] eyes…and therefore insane.”

Elizabeth’s life is not without controversy. In her attempts to gain her freedom, she has a complicated relationship with McFarland, the director of the asylum, and uses many methods to manipulate, outsmart, and befriend him to achieve her freedom. He becomes her lifelong adversary.

Recommended: I definitely recommend The Woman They Could Not Silence for readers who appreciate stories about the fight for women’s rights and mental health reform and for fans of stories about strong and determined women making a difference. She fought for us all. Thanks to Shellyrae @ Book’d Out for the rec!

Content Considerations: domestic abuse, difficult passages about the mistreatment of patients and the lack of care for the mentally ill

My Rating: 4 Stars

twinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-star

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore

The Woman They Could Not Silence Information Here

Meet the Author, Kate Moore

Author Kate MooreAmong other books, Kate is the author of The Radium Girls, which won the 2017 Goodreads Choice Award for Best History, was voted U.S. librarians’ favourite nonfiction book of 2017 and became a New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller.

A British writer based in England, Kate writes across multiple genres including history, biography, true  crime and grift, and has had many titles on the Sunday Times bestseller list. Her work has been featured across international media and translated into more than fifteen languages. A born public speaker, Kate regularly tours her books and is equally at home spinning stories onstage as she is writing them on her laptop in London.



A Few of My Favorite Narrative Nonfiction Titles:

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann
The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede
The Only Plane in the Sky by Garrett M. Graff
Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson (part narrative nonfiction, part historical essay)



 I’m linking up with Deb @ Deb’s World and SueDonna, and Jo for the February installment of #WhatsOnYourBookShelfChallenge.

Whats On Your Bookshelf Challenge



QOTD:

Do you enjoy narrative nonfiction?
What is your favorite form of nonfiction?
Is The Woman They Could Not Silence on your TBR or have you read it?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photos are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

One-In-A-Million Boy [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 17, 2022

One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood
#throwbackthursday

One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood (cover)

Genre/Categories: Fiction, Family Life, Unique Characters

Welcome to Throwback Thursday where I highlight an older review or post a current review of an old read. Today, I’m re-sharing one of my favorite quirky reads, One-In-A-Million Boy by Monica Wood. I included a brief review of this story in another post and now on the occassion of Throwback Thursday, I’m giving this review its own post.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Are you looking for a unique story?

An atypical 11-year-old boy is sent to help 104-year-old Ona every Saturday morning as part of a community service project. As he refills the bird feeders and helps with other odd jobs, he and Ona share cookies and milk and Ona tells him about her long life. He records her responses as part of a school interview project.

One Saturday, the boy doesn’t show up. Ona starts to think he’s not so special after all, but then his father arrives on her doorstep, determined to finish his son’s good deed.

My Thoughts:

Character Driven and Plot-Driven Balance: I love a character-driven story with enough plot to keep my interest. In the story, there are quirky characters to meet, relationships to figure out, a project to be completed, and a mission to achieve. It’s unique, heartfelt, memorable, and quirky; hopeful and bittersweet.

Structure: Told in a past and present timeline, the story has an interesting main character in that the boy is unnamed. This deliberate choice by the author left me pondering why. The boy is only half the story. The other half is about the boy’s father and his own relationship with Ona.

Themes: Important themes include the unlikely friendship between generations, loneliness, loss, grief, hope, healing, chosen family, and second chances.

Recommended: I’m recommending this unique story for fans of quirky characters, warm-hearted and endearing fiction, and chosen family.  One-In-A-Million Boy earned a spot as one of my favorites of 2016, and I’m urging you not to miss this memorable and uplifting story!

Trigger Warning: Loss of a child

My rating: 4.5 Stars

twinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-startwinkle-twinkle-little-star

The One-In-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood (cover)

One-In-A-Million Boy Information Here

Meet the Author, Monica Wood

Author, Monica WoodI was born in Mexico, Maine, to a family of devout Irish Catholics, a family of paper mill workers. My father and my mother’s parents came from Prince Edward Island in Canada, and brought with them the island tradition of storytelling. Although my sisters and I were the first generation in the family to go to college, I think of my background as a literary one. My father had a lilting island brogue and beautiful grammar; the notion that stories had to be told in a certain way was something I learned early. My grandfather used to sing long, melodramatic, novelistic ballads, another island tradition. I am not one of those writers who claim to have been weaned on  Proust, but I did read a lot, a happy habit for a child, I think, no matter what the material.  http://www.monicawood.com/



QOTD:

Have you read One-In-A-Million Boy or is it on your TBR?



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© ReadingLadies.com

 

 

 

 

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book? 10 Books Too Good To Review Properly #TopTenTuesday #LetsDiscuss2022

February 15, 2022

Have You Lost Your Heart in a Book?
What Makes a Book too Good to Review Properly?

10 Books Too Good to Review Properly" (white text over a background of a tall stack of hardback books)

 

I’m linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: Top Ten Books Too Good To Review Properly. This post is also an entry for the 2022 Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight.

 

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)2022 Discussion Challenge (meme)

Have you lost your heart in a book?
Have you been at a loss for words?

lose your heart in a book (white text above and below an open book with the center pages forming a heart...all on a lilac pink background)

Quite often when I attempt to write a review for a book I’ve really REALLY loved, I have a difficult time finding the right words to convey my thoughts. I’m lost for words! Whether you are writing a review or telling your best friend about a book, can you relate to my feelings? Which reviews are the most difficult for you? Which reviews are the easiest?

Why do I find it difficult to write reviews for books I’ve loved? It seems that writing a review for a book I loved should be the easiest to write. This is my reasoning for why it isn’t: I form an emotional connection with books I really really love. I leave a piece of my heart between the pages. A connection we make with a book is personal and when your heart is involved, it makes expressing thoughts coherently in a review more difficult. I fear you won’t feel the same connection or understand it.

The following list is a sample of the types of books I find it difficult to review because I’m lost for words. They are all 4.5-5 Star reads and are on my lifetime favs list and highly recommended. (reviews are linked)

What is one book you feel is too good to review?
Join the discussion in comments.

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

(in no particular order)

1

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza

A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the poignant themes that gripped my heart….and that last father/son section…all the tissues

2

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom (cover) text on a dark background...vignette of a rowboat on the water

…difficult to review because…
uniquely personal and affects every reader differently

3

The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede

The Day the World Came to Town

…difficult to review because…
the amount of kindness, sacrifice, and generosity is too much to list…also because it could have been any one of us on one of those planes that day…how many of you have received kind help from a stranger?

4

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson (cover) Image:

…difficult to review because…
poignant end of life reflections

5

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (cover)

…difficult to review because…
all the love for brave Eleanor and you have to experience the ending for yourself (IYKYK)

6

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell (cover) Image: head shot of a young boy wearing a felt hat and a large feather lies horizontally across his eyes

…difficult to review because…
so very emotional!

7

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (cover) Image: an astronaut floats in space tethered to a gold and black object

…difficult to review because…
can’t give away the sacrificial friendship aspect…and BOOM (!) I’ve already said too much! (IYKYK)…
(trust me, you want the audio format for this one!)

8

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer

…difficult to review because…
Backman and the heartfelt and emotional content

9

The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Dr. Edith Eva Eger
Finding Chika: A Little Girl, an Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom

…difficult to review because…
memoirs (how do you review someone’s life experience?)

10

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott

Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott (cover)

…difficult to review because…
(representative of all the incredibly difficult and emotional WW11 fiction I’ve read)
memorable characters, poignant themes



QOTD:

Have you read or reviewed any of these?
What’s one book you have found difficult to review?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
Goodreads
Pinterest



***Blog posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price. This money will be used to offset the costs of running a blog and to sponsor giveaways, etc.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

© WWW.ReadingLadies.com

 

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking [Book Review]

February 11, 2022

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Quiet by Susan Cain (cover) Image: red and white lettering on a muted gray background

Genre/Categories: Nonfiction, Psychology of Personalities

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

One third of the individuals we know are introverts. In Quiet, Susan Cain explores what this means in consideration of the recent rise of the Extrovert Ideal and worries that introverts can be undervalued and underappreciated. Identifying an introvert can be difficult since some individuals pretend to be extroverts to fit in. What can “quiet” do that we don’t give it credit for? If you are an introvert, Quiet has the power to change how you see yourself and how others see you. It will empower you.

***Note: The author uses the common spelling of “extrovert” rather than the more academic spelling of “extravert.” So I will as well.

back view of a woman walking on a log in a quiet forest of tall trees

Photo Source Brady Knoll on Pexels.com

My Thoughts:

OK….I feel SEEN….that is all!

I’m encouraging introverts AND extroverts to read Quiet. It will help you become a better leader of people and creator of environments in any organization, as well as a better parent and a better teacher. Anyone working with people will benefit! As a teacher and parent, I especially appreciated the targeted essays. My husband appreciated the leadership aspect and applications to the business world. (more…)

This Won’t End Well [Book Review] #ThrowBackThursday

February 10, 2022

This Won’t End Well by Camille Pagán
#throwbackthursday

This Won't End Well (cover) .... a young woman peeking through some bushes

Genre/Categories/Setting: Contemporary Fiction, Women’s Fiction

In 2020, I decided to systematically revisit my older review posts and update them. On Thursdays, I’ll be re-sharing a few of these great reads. Today, I’m re-sharing a fun romcom, This Won’t End Well by Camille Pagán.

I’m linking up today with Davida @ The Chocolate Lady’s Book Review Blog for #throwbackthursday.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

“In the long tradition of other beloved, quirky characters, Annie Mercer feels best when she limits her interactions with new people. As a scientist, she analyzes her life experiences through the lens of science. Suddenly her organized life is turned upside down: she loses her job, curiosity about a new neighbor consumes her, her fiance takes a leave of absence, and a personable and charismatic private investigator surprises her. Ultimately Annie is faced with some big, life-changing decisions.”

…Quirky + Snappy + Epistolary = a fun read! 

Continue here for my full review of This Won’t End Well…



QOTD:

Have you read This Won’t End Well or is it on your TBR?

10 Favorite Light Romance #TopTenTuesday

February 8, 2022

Ten Favorite Light Romance

20 Favorite Light Romance (white text over a background picture of pink roses lying in a white wicker basket)

I’m hopping aboard the “Love Freebie” train today and linking up with That Artsy Reader Girl: February Love Freebie

Top Ten Tuesday (meme)

“I LOVE a sweet romance!”

You’ll notice looking at this list that I love stories where romance is served as a SIDE. I adore romance when it’s served along with substantial content. That’s why I’m categorizing this list as “light” romance because the romance is not the main focus of the stories. It’s unlikely that these titles are actually shelved as “romance.”

Do you see any favorites?

***This post contains Amazon affiliate links. Titles are Amazon affiliate links or links to my reviews.

(in no particular order)

1

Love and Lavender by Josi S. Kilpack

Love and Lavender by Jose S. Kilpack (cover) Image: a woman in a long dress and bonnet stands alone in a field of lavender

2

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin (cover) Image: a young woman stands near shelf lined books next to a window holding an open book

3

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry

How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry (cover)

4

Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

last christmas in paris

5

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society y Mary Ann Shaffer (cover) Image: black text on a postcard....a woman dressed in a red coat stands at a railing overlooking the ocean

6

Castle of Water by Dane Hucklebridge

Castle of Water by Dane Huckelbridge (cover)

7

The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery

The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery (cover) Image a young girl leans against a tree with an open book

8

The Invisible Husband of Frick Island by Colleen Oakley

Invisible Husband of Frick Island by Colleen Oakley (cover) Image: coral and blue text....individual waves wrap randomly around the text

9

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman

Radar Girls by Sara Ackerman (cover) Image: two girls sit on a wing of a plane

10

Finding Love at Hedgehog Hollow by Jessica Redland

Finding Love at Hedgehog Hollow nyb Jessica Redland (cover) Image: a white farm house stands alone on a large grassy field...flowere and leaves edge the borders



QOTD:

Have you read any of these or can you recommend another title for my collection?



Happy Reading Book Worms

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



Let’s Get Social!

Thank you for visiting and reading today! I’d be honored and thrilled if you choose to enjoy and follow along (see subscribe or follow option), promote, and/or share my blog. Every share helps us grow.

Find me at:
Twitter
Instagram
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The Last Grand Duchess [Book Review]

February 7, 2022

The Last Grand Duchess by Bryn Turnbull

The Last Grand Duchess by Bryn Turnbull (cover) Image: side profile of a woman wearing a white lace shawl and long strands of pearls

Genre/Categories/Setting: Historical Fiction, Family Drama, Russia, the Romanovs

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

My Summary:

Welcome to my stop on the @HTPBooks Harlequin Trade Press Publishing’s 2022 Winter Blog Tour for Historical Fiction. Thanks #NetGalley @HarlequinBooks for my complimentary eARC of #TheLastGrandDuchess upon my request. All opinions are my own.

The Last Grand Duchess is the story of Olga Romanov and the Romanov family in their last years. We hear about Olga’s sheltered life living with her parents and siblings. Often present is Grigori Rasputin, a controversial priest and friend of the tsarina. As Olga divides her time between suitors, home, elegant ballrooms, and hospitals, she and the family face increasing danger from political unrest and home confinement.

Olga Romanov sits at a table reading a book

Olga Romanov

My Thoughts:

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