Women’s History Month 2020: 10 Inspirational Reads

March 2, 2020

Women’s History Month 2020: 10 Inspirational Reads

Six young women standing on a bluff with itheir hands on the shoulders of the girl in front of her ... all facing sideways looking at the ocean

Do You Need a Reading Idea for Women’s History Month?

Inspired by Women’s History Month, which was established to amplify women’s voices and value their contributions to history, I searched through my reading lists to find stories about inspirational women whom we can celebrate during Women’s History Month.

Historical Fiction is filled with inspirational women; some are actual historical figures and others are fictional characters who lived during a certain historical time period. For this list, I’ve chosen stories about real women in history. Titles are Amazon links and my available reviews are linked.

*This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

In no particular order….

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini

Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini (cover)

Brave women in the German resistance movement before and during WW11. (histfic) Full Review Here

Ribbons of Scarlet by Kate Quinn et al.

Ribbons of Scarlet by Kate Quinn et al. (cover)

Seven brave women of the French Revolution. (histfic) Full Review Here.

Learning to See by Elise Hooper

Learning to See by Elise Hooper (cover)

The fictionalized biographical history of photographer Dorothea Lange. Full Review Here.

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

My Dear Hamilton by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

This fictionalized biographical narrative of Eliza Hamilton reveals her vital contributions to U. S. History in her role as Mrs. Alexander Hamilton. Full Review Here

America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie

America's First Daughter by Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie (cover)

This fictionalized biographical narrative of Patsy Jefferson reveals her important role in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson and her contribution to her father’s overall health, well being, and success. Full Review Here

The Gilded Years by Karin Tanabe

The Gioded Years by Karin Tanabe (cover)

This fictionalized biography of Anita Hemmings, the first black student to attend Vassar in 1897, demonstrates the determination and courage required to attempt this groundbreaking feat. Full Review Here

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Immortal Life of Henietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (cover)

Historical Fiction account of the tragic story of Henrietta’s cells being used for science without her knowledge, permission, or compensation. (no review)

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly (cover)

Many readers have seen the inspirational movie adaptation featuring the women whose mathematical and computer skills contributed to the Space Race. (no review)

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

The Intention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (cover)

This is a fictionalized historical fiction story inspired by the Grimke sisters who were early pioneers in the abolitionist movement.  Full Review Here

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom (cover)

This is the well-known and best-selling memoir by Corrie Ten Boom that recounts her days and hopes for survival in a concentration camp. I think this was my first WW11 reading experience. (no review)



Young Adult, Middle Grade, and a Picture Book

(all are crossover reads that adult readers will enjoy)

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonia Iturbe (cover)

This is a fictionalized and compelling account of real-life Dita Kraus and her survival in a concentration camp during WW11. Full Review Here

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai 

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai (cover)

Malala represents brave women and girls who stand up for women’s rights in an oppressive culture. (no review)

Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science by Jeannine Atkins

Finding Wonders by Jeannine Atkins (cover)

It’s inspiring for mature middle-grade girls (and adults) to read fictionalized childhood biographies of three real women scientists and their contributions. Review (scroll down the page)

The Oldest Student by Rita Lorraine Hubbard

The Oldest Student by Rita Lorraine Hubbard (cover)

(picture book) Born into slavery, Mary Walker learned how to read at age 116! (not reviewed)



QOTD:

What titles can you add to this list? 



ICYMI

I finished my Winter 2019 TBR
(Spring coming very soon!)

February 2020 Reading Wrap Up

The Last Ten Books That Gave Me a Book Hangover



Happy Reading Book Buddies!

“Ah, how good it is to be among people who are reading.”
~Rainer Maria Rilke

“I love the world of words, where life and literature connect.”
~Denise J Hughes

“Reading good books ruins you for enjoying bad ones.”
~Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“I read because books are a form of transportation, of teaching, and of connection! Books take us to places we’ve never been, they teach us about our world, and they help us to understand human experience.”
~Madeleine Riley, Top Shelf Text



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***Blogs posts may contain affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I can earn a small percentage of your purchase price.

Unless explicitly stated that they are free, all books that I review have been purchased by me or borrowed from the library.

Book Cover and author photo are credited to Amazon or an author’s (or publisher’s) website.

17 thoughts on “Women’s History Month 2020: 10 Inspirational Reads

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  5. I have read about half of these books but now have some new ones to check out. I keep saying that I am going to read Henrietta Lacks, maybe I will try to fit it in this month. Great list Carol.

    Liked by 1 person

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